May 12, 2021
  • 5:53 am The effect of vertical migration strategy on retention and dispersion in the Irish Sea during spring–summer
  • 5:50 am The basal roughness of Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica
  • 5:48 am Tracking fitness in marine vertebrates: current knowledge and opportunities for future research
  • 5:47 am Coastal barium cycling at the West Antarctic Peninsula
  • 5:59 am Tour bus headed to Masters overturns, driver charged with DUI: Officials

first_img Written by Brad James June 12, 2019 /Sports News – Local Oliver Dunn Named To the 2019 ABCA/Rawlings West All-Region Team Tags: 2019 MLB Draft/New York Yankees/Oliver Dunn/Utah Baseball FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailSALT LAKE CITY-Wednesday, University of Utah baseball infielder Oliver Dunn earned another postseason award as he was named to the 2019 ABCA/Rawlings West All-Region second team.Dunn, who completed his junior season, was also drafted 345th overall (11th round) in the MLB Draft by the New York Yankees, last week.Dunn led the Utes in 11 offensive categories and hit .366 on the season with 71 hits, 45 runs scored, 22 doubles and four triples.The durable Dunn started all 49 games for the Utes last season and started 117 consecutive games as well as 153 of 155 games in his collegiate career.last_img read more

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first_imgFacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare The University Of Southern Indiana Softball Team Will Be Remembered Forever.The Screaming Eagles are back in Evansville after winning their first-ever NCAA title in Salem, Virginia on Monday.The team was greeted by hundreds of fans at the Physical Activities Center on campus, as they arrived in style escorted by fire trucks and local police.Mayor Lloyd Winnecke was one of several government officials in attendance. He declared May 30 USI National Championship Day.This year’s softball team is the first college softball program in Indiana history to win a national title. TwitterFacebooklast_img

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first_imgAlong with the day’s historical significance, Americans tend to consider Labor Day as marking the “unofficial end of summer.” Many people wrap their vacations around Labor Day in anticipation of fall activities, like the start of school and cool-weather sports. The first Labor Day holiday was celebrated on Tuesday, September 5, 1882, in New York City, in accordance with the plans of the Central Labor Union. The Central Labor Union held its second Labor Day holiday just a year later, on September 5, 1883.As proposed by the Central Labor Union, the first Labor Day celebration was highlighted by a parade to show the public “the strength and esprit de corps of the trade and labor organizations.” Either way, history is clear that the first Labor Day observance was held in accordance with a plan developed by Matthew Maguire’s Central Labor Union.The First Labor Day Who Invented Labor Day? The Carpenters or the Machinists?More than 130 years after the first Labor Day was observed in 1882, there is still disagreement as to who first suggested the “national day off.” In 1884, the Labor Day observance was changed to the first Monday in September as originally proposed by the Central Labor Union. The union then urged other unions and trade organizations to begin holding a similar “workingmen’s holiday” on the same date. The idea caught on, and by 1885, Labor Day observances were being held in industrial centers nationwide.Not to Be Confused With International Workers’ Day In every sense, the underlying meaning of Labor Day is different from that of any other yearly holiday. “All other holidays are in a more or less degree connected with conflicts and battles of man’s prowess over man, of strife and discord for greed and power, of glories achieved by one nation over another,” said Samuel Gompers, founder of the American Federation of Labor. “Labor Day…is devoted to no man, living or dead, to no sect, race, or nation.” Always looking for already popular ideas to get behind, the senators and representatives of the U.S. Congress took note of the growing Labor Day movement and June 28, 1894, passed an act making the first Monday in September of each year a legal holiday in the District of Columbia and the U.S. territories.How Labor Day Has Changed Today, the first day of May is still observed in many countries as “International Workers’ Day,” or more often as “Labour Day.”Labor Day Gains Government Recognition As with most things involving a potential day off, Labor Day became very popular very fast, and by 1885, several city governments have adopted ordinances calling for local observances.While New York was the first state legislature to propose official, statewide observance of Labor Day, Oregon was the first state to actually adopt a Labor Day law on February 2l, l887. The same year, Colorado, Massachusetts, New Jersey, and New York also enacted Labor Day observance laws, and by 1894, 23 other states followed suit.center_img by Robert Longley Labor Day is a public holiday in the United States. Always observed on the first Monday in September, Labor Day celebrates and honors the contribution of the American system of organized labor and workers to the prosperity and economic strength of the nation. The Monday of Labor Day along with the Saturday and Sunday preceding it is known as the Labor Day Weekend and is traditionally considered the end of summer. As a federal holiday, all but essential national, state, and local government offices are typically closed on Labor Day. In 1866, International Workers’ Day or “May First” was established an alternative holiday for the celebration of organized labor. Observed annually on May 1, the day was created by a resolution during the 1884 convention of the American Federation of Labor in Chicago. The date was chosen due to its proximity to the date of the bloody Chicago Haymarket Affair labor demonstration and bombing of May 4, 1886.Some labor unions of the day felt that International Workers’ Day was a more appropriate tribute to the struggles of their cause than Labor Day, which they considered a frivolous picnic-and-parade day. However, conservative Democratic President Grover Cleveland feared that a holiday to honor labor on May 1 would become a negative commemoration of the Haymarket Affair, rather than a positive celebration of how the nation benefited from labor. Not a Day Off for Everybodyit should be noted that millions of hard-working Americans, like those in the retail and service industries, along with those in law enforcement, public safety, and health care observe Labor Day by working as usual. Perhaps they deserve the special appreciation of those of us who do get to spend the day eating the hot dogs and drinking the beers. Labor Day is the day to “throw down your tools,” and eat too many hot dogs while thanking American workers for their collective contribution to the strength, prosperity, quality of life, cold beer, and great sales enjoyed across the nation. America’s carpenters and construction workers, along with some historians will tell you that it was Peter J. McGuire, general secretary of the Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners and a co-founder of the American Federation of Labor, who first suggested a day to honor those “who from rude nature have delved and carved all the grandeur we behold.”However, others believe that Matthew Maguire – no relation to Peter J. McGuire – a machinist who would later be elected secretary of Local 344 of the International Association of Machinists in Paterson, New Jersey proposed Labor Day in 1882 while serving as secretary of New York’s Central Labor Union. As massive displays and gatherings have become larger problems for public safety agencies, especially in large industrial centers, the character of Labor Day celebrations have changed. However, those changes, as noted by the U.S. Department of Labor, have been more of “a shift in emphasis and medium of expression.” Thanks mainly to television, the internet, and social media, Labor Day addresses by leading union officials, industrialists, educators, clerics, and government officials are delivered directly into the homes, swimming pools, and BBQ pits of Americans nationwide.“The vital force of labor added materially to the highest standard of living and the greatest production the world has ever known and has brought us closer to the realization of our traditional ideals of economic and political democracy,” notes the Labor Department. “It is appropriate, therefore, that the nation pays tribute on Labor Day to the creator of so much of the nation’s strength, freedom, and leadership— the American worker.” FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

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first_imgAny comments posted in this column do not represent the views or opinions of the City-County Observer or our advertisers.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailShare We hope that today’s “IS IT TRUE” will provoke honest and open dialogue concerning issues that we, as responsible citizens of this community, need to address in a rational and responsible way?IS IT TRUE that if long-time Republican leader and elected official Cheryl Musgrave could become a spoiler of Rick Davis proportion in the primary if the citizens of registered Republicans of Evansville have an opportunity to choose substance and infrastructure over fun, games, and chicken fat dances? …Mayor Winnecke is a shoo-in if he survives the Republican primary and that is only as sure as a decision by Commissioner Musgrave not to run?IS IT TRUE that 2019 is a brand new year and it is a year for the citizens of Evansville to have an opportunity to decide how much they like the status quo or if they would like to get that new broom out and sweep the civic center clean? …Mayor Winnecke and the entire cast of council members are up for election and each will get to make the case to keep their jobs? …some will have strong opponents and others will either run unopposed or face the politician’s dream of an unelectable strawman with no money?…the City-County Observer hopes that all nine council seats and the Mayor face strong opponents that offer a different set of ideas so the townsfolk can have an opportunity to think things through?IS IT TRUE the last thing we want to see is a repeat of the city mayoral election of 2007 when a strawman of epic proportion won the Republican primary and proceeded to hand Jonathan Weinzapfel an 85–15 victory that blew his head up so big that we wondered how he could fit it in a car?…that election cycle even had the late great Democrat strongman Larry Aitken on the evening news expressing his belief that Weinzapfel would be the President of the United States someday?…the next four years were marred with arrogance and refusal to ask for the voters opinions at the ballot box on whether or not to borrow $127 million to construct the downtown arena now called the Ford Center?…four years later the chickens of hubris and arrogance came home to roost when Rick Davis single-handedly ended the political career of Jonathan Weinzapfel and handily defeated Troy Tornatta in a Democrat primary that was just plain ugly?…the Vanderburgh Democrat Party has never been the same since and we truly hope they can muster some decent candidates in 2019?IS IT TRUE since we posted that Ben Trockman is considering running for the 1st Ward City Council seat we have received several phone calls and e-mails encouraging him to run for this position? …we are also hearing that several Republicans are strongly encouraging him not to run for this position?IS IT TRUE that the buzz around the Civic Center is if Ben Trockman decides to run for the 1st Ward City Council seat he would win by a comfortable margin?IS IT TRUE we are told that many people are still upset that a couple of the current members of City Council wasted $200,000 of our tax dollars on the defunct Earthcare Energy project several years ago? …we are told that several candidates running against current City Council members will make the Earthcare vote a campaign issue?IS IT TRUE we wonder if you are aware that over the years that our City and County elected officials have discreetly increased our property tax assessments which in turn have increased our property taxes?  IS IT TRUE the buzz around the Civic Center is that the political strategy to run four (4) people for City Council that is currently working for the same business will backfire?IS IT TRUE don’t be surprised that the current and projected water and sewer rates will become a major campaign issue?  …we are told that several candidates running for the Evansville City Council are going to take to task member of the Water and Sewer Board for their exorbitant spending habits?IS IT TRUE if our water and sewer rates keeping going up the cost of a gallon of water will cost more than a gallon of Jack Daniels?IS IT TRUE when the people fear the Government we have Tyranny!  When the Government fears the people we have Liberty!Todays“Readers Poll” question is: How many new members do you think will be on the 2019 City Council?Please go to our link of our media partner Channel 44 News located in the upper right-hand corner of the City-County Observer so you can get the up-to-date news, weather, and sports.If you would like to advertise on the CCO please contact us at City-County [email protected]: City-County Observer Comment Policy. Be kind to people. No personal attacks or harassment will not be tolerated and shall be removed from our site.We understand that sometimes people don’t always agree and discussions may become a little heated.  The use of offensive language, insults against commenters will not be tolerated and will be removed from our site.last_img read more

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first_imgLoad remaining images Set on the third floor of Albuquerque’s Convention Center exists an unassuming site of great delights. From the outside, devoid of marquee or even a sign, the Kiva Auditorium would be missed by most, sans for the security checkpoints and ancillary bar, but after passing through the pat-down, fans are greeted with wall-to-wall carpeting, padded, comfortable chairs, and aisles wide enough to accommodate four shoulder-to-shoulder. At a capacity of 2300, this intimate space has been the site of revelry for many artists for more than three decades. Saturday night, this venue once again played host to greatness, welcoming Bob Weir and Wolf Bros on their inaugural two-month tour.Wasting no time, Bob Weir and The Brothers Lobo got the evening started with a slow-paced version of “Jack Straw”, which contained the first location reference of the set. It was clear from the resounding applause at its start, and the uninhibited audience sing-along, that the faithful were in attendance and they were ready for Weir’s latest incarnation. The band continued with the classic Weir cover of “Walkin’ Blues”. This selection kept the audience engaged in familiarity, as Weir showcased his slide work, receiving noticeable acceptance. Pulling from his latest catalog, Weir brought out “Gonesville” in the third slot, which surprisingly saw very little change in audience contribution from the classic openers, as many in attendance seemed to be well versed in the lyrics and supported Bobby through the stanzas.The second spatial reference of the night came in the form of “El Paso”, as Bobby strapped on the acoustic, before taking the room on a romp through the Southwest. “Corrina” was warmly welcomed to the setlist, as the crowd lit up with its opening percussive roles from skin master Jay Lane. This version came in at over 8-minutes and got the place moving with the first improvisational exploration of the night. Over the summer when Dead & Company made a stop in Albuquerque, a huge dust storm settled in over the Isleta Amphitheater, delaying the show. As many stood in line for that event, a handful of songs were in speculation to reflect the weather, and one in particular which was not played, finally found its way into the setlist last night. “Black-Throated Wind” blew its way through the room and was warmly welcomed with noticeable excitement, as the front row lit up with smiles and bouncing bodies.Before proceeding, Bobby started with a story, narrating a day when he went for a run, ended up on top of a mountain, and turned, finally noticing the colossal storm that had been trailing him to the apex. As the weather began to distress the athletic bard, instead of panic, he found inspiration, and the songs that were born out of the day, became the closer of the set. The standard pairing of “Lost Sailor” into “Saint of Circumstance” once again proved that Bobby still has the vocal chops to bring the house down, with a resounding climax that finished these tunes. Laying out the final crescendo, smiles all around, Bobby informed the audience, “We’ll be back in just a little bit.”As the lights came up, conversations between friends and strangers were being had across the room, and every face was lit with a grin. Patrons were given close to a half-hour to recharge for the second set. Most were in their seats not wanting to miss a note when the lights finally dropped, and the trio returned to the stage. Bobby opened the second set with another of one of his cowboy campfire songs, kicking off the second set with “Only A River”, as he strummed the acoustic strings along with his 1000 backupk-up singers. Enjoying the fire light of the intimate surroundings, Weir continued on in that old familiar way and delivered on Merle Haggard’s “Mama Tried”. At the double acoustic take, Weir stepped to the mic and stated that it really wouldn’t be a great show unless the band tried something live for the first time, and proceeded to deliver on a ten-minute “Eyes of The World”. The lilting sonic space that the band produced resulted in many closed eyes, as the tiny room danced. The softness of the piece was well executed without flaw, sans Weir’s singular lyrical debacle, producing laughter from both sides of the stage. The tail end built upward into a calypso-styled theme, which presented with strong work by Lane, as well as heavy lifting by Don Was on the upright bass. The theme was built off of a progressive rift, as the rhythm section delivered the thunderous climatic end, and sat there smiling at each other and the audience. Weir started the “Eyes” riff up again, unaccompanied for a few measures, before Lane and Was joined back in, looking sort of puzzled as to where the band was going.Keeping the faith in the unknown, the riff finally morphed into “Throwing Stones”, with fevered excitement from the crowd. With the political climate and the voting season upon us, Weir took to opportunity to express his explicative feelings about our modern government, the love of money, and how political office can be bought. New Mexico is a fairly liberal state, and with the strong lyrics and Weir’s charge, it was no wonder that this tune brought the greatest reaction of the night. As the tune slowly wound down, without even a hint or a tease, the triad dropped into “The Music Never Stopped”. This trio continued to deliver on the brilliance of their second set, eventually seguing into “Goin’ Down The Road Feeling Bad”, the appropriate parting song.With a short walk off stage, the band came returned and delivered a great closer for what had been an all-night-long sing-along. Weir strapped on the acoustic one last time for a great rendition of “Ripple”. Of course, everyone thought that was the end, but these merry pranksters had one more trick up their sleeves, as they delivered the Grateful Dead anthem “Touch of Grey”, to send the heads off into the night with a moment of mental and emotional brilliance, as we’re all reminded that we are more alike and together than not. Bob Weir and Wolf Bros tour continues tomorrow night, Monday, October 29th, with a performance at Denver’s Paramount Theatre. For a full list of upcoming dates, see below. For more information on the Bob Weir and Wolf Bros tour, head to Weir’s website.Check out a gallery of photos from last night’s show courtesy of photographer Jake Sudek below.Bob Weir and Wolf Bros Upcoming Tour Dates:10/29 – Denver, CO – Paramount Theatre10/31 – Chicago, IL – The Chicago Theatre11/1 – Chicago, IL – The Chicago Theatre11/5 – Nashville, TN – Ryman Auditorium11/6 – Louisville, KY – Palace Theatre11/8 – Syracuse, NY – Landmark Theatre11/9 – Port Chester, NY – Capitol Theatre11/10 – Port Chester, NY – Capitol Theatre11/12 – Washington, DC – Warner Theatre11/13 – Philadelphia, PA – The Fillmore11/15 – Boston, MA – Boch Center Wang Theatre11/16 – Boston, MA – Boch Center Wang Theatre11/18 – New York, NY – Beacon Theatre11/19 – New York, NY – Beacon TheatreView All Tour DatesSetlist: Bob Weir and Wolf Bros | Kiva Auditorium | Albuquerque, NM | 10/27/2018Set One: Jack Straw, Walkin’ Blues, Gonesville, El Paso, Black-Throated Wind, Corrina, Lost Sailor > Saint of CircumstanceSet Two: Only A River, Mama Tried, Eyes Of The World, Throwing Stones, The Music Never Stopped, Going Down The Road Feelin’ BadEncore: Ripple, Touch of GreyBob Weir and Wolf Bros | Kiva Auditorium | Albuquerque, NM | 10/27/2018 | Photos: Jake Sudek Photo: Jake Sudeklast_img read more

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first_imgOne of the greatest challenges in treating tuberculosis — the top infectious killer worldwide, according to the World Health Organization (WHO) — is the bacterium’s ability to shapeshift rapidly and become resistant to multiple drugs. Identifying resistant strains quickly and choosing the right antibiotics to treat them remains difficult for several reasons, including the bacterium’s propensity to grow slowly in the lab, which can delay drug-sensitivity test results by as much as six weeks after initial diagnosis.New tests that can quickly and reliably detect resistance to the most commonly used drugs before a patient begins treatment are urgently needed to improve outcomes and help curb the spread of the infection.Now, Harvard College applied math student Michael Chen ’20, working with biomedical researchers at Harvard Medical School’s Blavatnik Institute, has designed a computer program that sets the stage for the development of such tests.The program, described April 29 in EBioMedicine, can accurately predict a TB strain’s resistance to 10 first- and second-line drugs in a tenth of a second and with greater precision than similar models.If incorporated into clinical tests, the model could make resistance detection both faster and more accurate, overcoming deficiencies in current resistance-testing methods that either take too long to yield definitive results or are unreliable.“Drug-resistant forms of TB are hard to detect, hard to treat, and portend poor outcomes for patients,” said senior study author Maha Farhat, assistant professor of biomedical informatics at Harvard Medical School and a pulmonary medicine specialist at Massachusetts General Hospital. “The ability to rapidly detect the full profile of resistance upon diagnosis is critical both to improving individual patient outcomes and in reducing the spread of the infection to others.”The new model will be available online soon as an added feature to Harvard Medical School’s genTB tool, which analyzes TB data and predicts TB drug resistance.More than 10 million new cases of TB are diagnosed each year worldwide, according to WHO. Of these new infections, 4 percent are resistant to at least two drugs — a form of the disease known as multidrug-resistant TB, or MDR-TB. Of the drug-resistant infections, one in 10 are extensively drug-resistant, or XDR-TB, and show great resistance to multiple medications. First-line drugs are given as soon as infection is established, while second-line treatments are added if the patient shows symptoms of resistance or a test shows that the bacterial strain is impervious to first-line treatments.Imperfect testingIn the developing world, where drug-sensitivity testing can be difficult to obtain, many people diagnosed with TB are treated empirically, based on little more than educated clinical guesswork and assumption.Fewer than half of the countries with a high prevalence of MDR-TB infections have modern diagnostic capabilities. Even in the best-equipped laboratories, conventional, culture-based drug sensitivity testing takes weeks or months before results can be reported because the TB bacterium tends to grow slowly in dishes, a downside magnified by the small but real infection risk faced by lab workers who handle TB samples.New molecular tests that scan the DNA of TB samples for resistance genes are increasingly being used, but they have their own limitations — the most important being that they detect resistance for only up to four drugs, and not reliably. They also cannot detect the presence of rare genetic variants that give rise to resistance.The best way to detect all resistance-conferring mutations is to perform an analysis of a bacterium’s full genome. There are several drug-sensitivity tests based on whole-genome sequencing data, and while they detect resistance to all first-line drugs, they tend to perform poorly on resistance detection to second-line drugs, the researchers said.These tests also tend to classify a mutation in a simple, binary fashion — either as conferring drug resistance or not — which makes them unreliable detectors of drug resistance in strains that contain rare mutations or mutations of unknown significance. Another critical blind spot of current models using whole-genome data is their inability to assess the interactions between various genes and genetic mutations; in other words, how the presence of one gene or a gene variant influences the function of another, a phenomenon known as epistasis. The new model overcomes this flaw.Beyond simple detectionTo solve the challenge, the scientists set out to create a program that could capture the synergistic effects of multiple mutations. They designed and tested five computational models, two of which stood out for their accuracy. One was a statistical model based on a form of logistic regression analysis, a way to assess the effect of one variable on another. The other was a neural network approach that combined two modes of analysis — wide learning and deep learning. The wide-learning part of the model is similar to a statistical model where each mutation is coded as a variable that either confers resistance or doesn’t. The deep-learning part incorporates hidden layers that assess the interactive effects of multiple genes and multiple mutations. The result is a model that behaves more or less as a diagnostic tool than can assess all available information against prior knowledge to make a determination about resistance.“Our goal was to develop a neural network model, which is a type of machine learning that loosely resembles how connections between neurons are formed in the brain,” said Chen, who started writing the program as a first-year and is now a junior pursuing a degree in applied math with a secondary degree in computer science. The study’s first author, he plans to go to medical school.“The wide and deep neural network interlaces two forms of machine learning to identify the combined effects of genetic variants on antibiotic resistance,” Chen said.The logistic regression model and the wide-and-deep learning model performed comparably, but the wide-and-deep model had a slight advantage in predicting resistance to several second-line therapies due to its ability to analyze the combined effects of multiple mutations on a strain’s resistance, as well as the effects of extremely rare genetic mutations with little or unknown significance. This latter feature renders the wide-and-deep learning model more accurate in its predictions than previous models, the research team said, giving it the ability to capture resistance even in samples that contain rare gene mutations whose influence on drug sensitivity is not well understood. In contrast, previously developed machine-learning platforms rely on spotting common gene mutations that are already known to cause resistance.“The wide-and-deep model is a decision-making tool that combines all of the data with prior biological knowledge that resistance is caused both by large individual mutations and the interactions between many different mutations,” said study co-senior author Andy Beam, faculty member in biomedical informatics at HMS and a visiting lecturer at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.Quality educationWhat made the models successful? Researchers credit the richness of the data on which the programs were “trained.” Rather than learning a predefined set of common genetic mutations that are known to promote resistance, the models were exposed to a data set that included a wide range of genetic mutations with a variety of gene insertions and deletions and extremely rare variants appearing only in a few of the isolates or even one isolate.The models were trained on 3,601 TB strains resistant to first- and second-line drugs, including 1,228 multidrug-resistant strains. The data set included results from drug-sensitivity testing, allowing the model to assess the link between the presence of certain mutations and drug sensitivity. The training sets were generated with data from various countries curated by researchers at the Critical Path Institute, with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.To test their performance in a realistic setting, the models were challenged to predict resistance in a set of 792 fully sequenced TB genomes they had never “seen” before. This created a high-fidelity testing scenario that eliminated the chance that the models would encounter familiar strains they had “studied” during training.The wide-and-deep neural network model predicted resistance to first-line drugs with 94 percent accuracy, on average, and 90 percent accuracy to second-line drugs, on average. The statistical model predicted resistance with 94 percent and 88 percent accuracy, respectively. The wide-and-deep neural network model showed slightly greater accuracy in predicting resistance to three specific drugs.Both models are capable of predicting resistance to first- and second-line therapies in a tenth of a second, underscoring the increasingly important role that artificial intelligence and big data will play in the rapid detection and choice of therapy for the disease.“Our model highlights the role of artificial intelligence in the case of TB, but its importance goes well beyond TB,” Beam said. “AI will help guide clinical decision-making by rapidly synthesizing large amounts of data to help clinicians make the most informed decision in many scenarios and for many other diseases.”Co-investigators included Luca Freschi and Isaac Kohane of Harvard Medical School; Akshith Doddi of the University of Virginia School of Medicine; Jimmy Royer of Analysis Group; and Marco Schito and Matthew Ezewudo of the Critical Path Institute. The research was supported by National Institutes of Health BD2K. Study authors Ezewudo and Schito received grants from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation during the course of the research.last_img read more

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first_imgReleasing more than 225 news items, Georgia FACES remained the news to use about Georgia family, agricultural, consumer and environmental sciences in 2007. Sorted by date and linked to the story in the archive, here are 2007’s top 10 stories in 9categories:agriculture,business,education,environment,food& health, home& garden, lifestyles,scienceand weather. AgricultureBusinessEducationEnvironmentFood& HealthHome& GardenLifestylesScienceWeatherlast_img

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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Reinforcements are on their way. New York State is sending 500 pieces of snow-fighting equipment and 100 National Guard members to Suffolk County to assist clean up efforts after a blizzard dumped upwards of two feet of snow on the county, mostly on the East End, Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced Tuesday afternoon. A blizzard warning remains in effect for Suffolk until midnight.Snow is expected to continue through the afternoon, with up to 3 inches falling during that time. Strong wind gusts—potentially up to 40 mph—could lead to periods of blowing snow, forecasters said. Temperatures will remain below freezing. “Falling and blowing snow with strong winds and poor visibilities will lead to whiteout conditions…making travel extremely dangerous,” the National Weather Service said in its most recent update. In the days leading up to the storm, forecasters predicted up to 36 inches of snow would fall, leading to travel bans, suspension of Long Island Rail Road service and mass airline cancellations. New York City and other areas were spared, but not Suffolk County. The East End was especially hit hard, with the Hampton Bays, Orient, and Mattituck forced to dig out of more than two feet of snow. Snowfall accumulation ranged from a foot to nearly 30 inches in Suffolk, according to the National Weather Service. “Communities east of the William Floyd Parkway, especially Riverhead and Southampton, have received the most snow, and some areas are still projected to get 20 to 30 inches of snow accumulation,” Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone said on his Facebook page. Although the state lifted a travel ban earlier in the day, Bellone urged drivers to remain off the roads. last_img read more

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first_img“See, Senator Perdue feels entitled to this U.S. Senate seat. This is the guy who hasn’t held a single public town hall meeting in six years as our senator. Just imagine being a sitting United States Senator, and he happily will sell meetings for corporate PAC checks. “He sells access to his home for corporate money. He sells lavish retreats on private islands to lobbyists for corporate PAC money, but he hasn’t seen fit to come out in public and defend his record or answer questions from the people at a public town hall meeting in six years. And then when it comes time for Senator Perdue to answer some questions in public, when it comes time for Senator Perdue to debate his opponent, he doesn’t take kindly to being asked tough questions. “And he refuses to debate in an open forum, because Senator Perdue cannot defend the indefensible, he cannot defend attacking our health care in the midst of a pandemic. He cannot defend misleading us so profoundly about a threat to our health and our prosperity, that’s taken such a human tragedy. He cannot defend being such a weak enabler of this president, who doesn’t deserve his loyalty or our support. “See, what we’re demanding, what we deserve from our leaders, what we deserve from our government, it’s not that complicated. It’s not mysterious. We believe that every single Georgia family should have access to affordable housing, affordable health care, education without debt, dignified work that pays a living wage, equal justice under the law regardless of race, and regardless of class. “It’s not that complicated. We expect our leaders to unite us to confront threats like this pandemic, to appeal to us to see what brings us together, rather than drives us apart, to remind us, y’all, that we’re all Americans, we’re all in this together. We rise or we fall together. This isn’t about red versus blue. This isn’t about party labels. This is about human lives, human decency, human rights, the human consequences of elections. “So now this race is headed to a runoff. And the people of Georgia will decide on January 5th, 2021, who represents us in the United States Senate. We have all the momentum. We have all the energy. We’re on the right side of history. Y’all ready to work?“We’re just getting started. Thank you so much for being here, I appreciate it.” It’s gonna be an uphill fight every single step of the way, like everything else over the last four years. “Thank you all so, so much for being here. It means the world to me to see y’all here. – Advertisement – “Most of all, I want to thank the amazing people of this state. The millions of Georgia voters who have stood up in record-shattering numbers to demand change for our state and change in this country.“When Congressman Lewis marched across that bridge 55 years ago to demand the sacred right to vote for all Americans, it was so that we the people could decide who represents us, could demand that our interests, our health, our prosperity, our rights, be upheld, respected, and expanded, so that we could have moments like this one, where Georgians in their millions have said, ‘enough.’ Enough incompetence, deceit, corruption, division. “Change has come to Georgia. Change is coming to America. – Advertisement – “And retirement is coming for Senator David Perdue, because the majority of Georgians have stood up to reject his request for a second term — a senator who saw fit to continue to attack our health care in the midst of a pandemic. A senator who told us that this disease that’s taken a quarter of a million American lives was no deadlier than the ordinary flu — while he looked out for himself. “A senator who has shown no spine and no independence, who has sold out our values and our interests to his donors and to this president. “Retirement is coming for Senator David Perdue. – Advertisement – – Advertisement –last_img read more

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first_imgNov 3, 2009Vaccine production reaches 31.8 million dosesTotal H1N1 vaccine availability today reached 31.8 million doses, said US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Director Dr. Thomas Frieden at a briefing, up 1.8 million doses from yesterday. “We are therefore on track to hit the 10 million increase that we had been hoping for” this week, though the total is far from satisfactory, he said. He declined to predict when the US will give vaccine doses to developing countries, saying it will depend on clarification of production.http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/?date=110309CDC H1N1 informationUptake of seasonal flu vaccine may set recordThis year’s uptake of seasonal flu vaccine is “unprecedented” and may set a record, said CDC Director Dr. Thomas Frieden at today’s H1N1 news briefing. The CDC expects that 114 million doses will be distributed by the end of the year, but the demand may be greater still, he said. He also said there are signs of a higher vaccination rate than usual among healthcare workers, who usually have only about a 40% immunization rate.http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/?date=110209CDC H1N1 informationVirginia takes steps to keep voters healthyElection officials in Virginia, whose citizens vote for governor today, among other offices, are taking steps to avoid transmitting H1N1 influenza. According to the Associated Press (AP), voters will have hand sanitizer available at the polls and possibly cotton swabs or disposable coffee stirrers so they can avoid contact with touch-screen machines. Some sites also have backup election workers on standby.http://www.wtop.com/?nid=25&sid=1800896Nov 3 AP storyIndiana pigs get pandemic fluThe US Department of Agriculture (USDA) yesterday reported that four samples from Indiana pigs tested positive for pandemic H1N1 influenza. The samples were collected on Oct 22. Indiana’s state veterinarian said in a statement yesterday that the animals have recovered and are being monitored. He said workers who had contact with the animals had been sick with flulike symptoms before some of the pigs became ill.http://www.usda.gov/documents/FINAL_RESULTS_2009_PANDEMIC_H1N1_INFLUENZA_CHT.pdfNov 2 USDA reportGSK vaccine gets Saudi approvalThe Saudi Food and Drug Authority approved GlaxoSmithKline’s H1N1 vaccine yesterday, according to Reuters, as the kingdom readied for more than 2 million pilgrims at this month’s Islamic hajj. The vaccine is distributed under the Pandemrix brand.http://www.reuters.com/article/swineFlu/idUSL3692176Nov 3 Reuters storySouth African panel favors novel H1N1 in seasonal vaccineSouth Africa’s National Institute of Communicable Diseases has recommended that South Africa include the pandemic H1N1 virus in its seasonal flu vaccine for next year, according to News24, a South African online news service. Barry Schoub, director of the institute, said it would be up to the nation’s health department whether to follow the advice. Reports did not clarify whether the pandemic virus would replace the seasonal H1N1 strain in the vaccine or be added to it.http://www.news24.com/Content/World/SwineFlu/1255/d2c7bbf714634568a571e216f4bb6932/02-11-2009-08-14/H1N1_vaccine_in_flu_vaccineNov 2 News24 reportFDA issues guidance on diagnostic testsThe US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published guidance yesterday to help manufacturers develop diagnostic tests for the novel H1N1 influenza virus. Manufacturers of tests can submit a request to the FDA for an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA). If granted, the EUA will allow the test to be used during the H1N1 pandemic. No H1N1 test is currently approved or cleared by the FDA.http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm188717.htmNov 2 FDA news releaselast_img read more

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