July 29, 2021
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first_imgAdriana Perez | The Observer At the end of the steps of Main Building, by the entrance to the second floor, fabric covers a mural of Queen Isabella I of Spain. The tapestry depicts local flora and fauna, as well as imagery important for both Indigenous and Christian traditions.When the initial decision to cover the murals was made in Jan. 2019, many denounced it publicly. Yet other individuals and groups supported it, like the student senate, Student Government, College Democrats, BridgeND’s vice president and the Observer Editorial Board.But some — who appreciated the decision — also expressed that acknowledging Native heritage while aiming toward a more diverse and inclusive Notre Dame required an approach more nuanced than just covering the murals.“A curtain can be easy and cheap, both intellectually and financially. What a university with real vision, with real character, must do is face the challenge head on, to its core,” Christian Moevs, associate professor of Italian studies, wrote in a Letter to the Editor published Feb. 19, 2019.Where do we go from here?A similar sentiment to that expressed by Moevs remains even today, as students, faculty and staff reflect on the recent covering of the Columbus Murals and where the University can go from here.“We did a lot of heavy lifting, and to finally see something come of that — it was good,” senior Marcus Winchester-Jones, treasurer of the Native American Student Association at Notre Dame (NASAND), said of the murals being covered. Winchester-Jones is a member of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi.Notre Dame is “heading in the right direction with that move,” he said. “But there’s still a lot of work to be done, for sure.”In their report, the Columbus Murals Committee had offered two additional recommendations “concerning further actions the University might take to foster continuing conversation, teaching and research about the murals and their various contexts,” per the cover letter.The first additional recommendation was to announce a University-wide observance of Founder’s Day “on the feast day of St. Edward the Confessor (October 13), thus occurring close to but not coinciding with Columbus Day,” according to the committee’s report.A celebration of Founder’s Day would display the murals and invite dialogue about them in connection with a scholarly symposium or teach-in exploring Notre Dame’s early history.The committee also recommended that Native American communities integral to the University’s founding — such as the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi — be concretely and tangibly recognized, with a monumental sculpture, a prominent land acknowledgment or the establishment of more scholarships for Native American students.NASAND has asked the University to officially recognize the second Monday of October as Indigenous Peoples’ Day — a day in which the United States has traditionally observed the anniversary of Columbus’ arrival to the Americas, with Columbus Day.“We’re not asking much,” Winchester-Jones said. He added that the change would be an indication to NASAND that “even though we’re small, we’re mighty. And we can get things done, even though the Native population and those interested in the culture aren’t always large in numbers.”The University has not officially acknowledged Indigenous Peoples’ Day, but it also does not recognize Columbus Day, “given that it is a day of classes and work for our campus community,” Firth said. Students, faculty and staff are expected to continue with their normal daily activities as if it were a normal day, not a federal holiday.As of 2019, “at least ten states now celebrate some version of Indigenous Peoples’ Day… Many college campuses have dumped Columbus Day for Indigenous Peoples’ Day as have more than 100 cities, towns and counties across the country,” according to NPR. Some of the colleges that have done so include Syracuse, Johns Hopkins and Columbia University.“In the future, if I had to imagine Indigenous Peoples’ Day [at Notre Dame], I think it’d be cool to have a powwow on that day,” Winchester-Jones said. A powwow is a traditional celebration of Native American culture with a social gathering for dancing and singing.Winchester-Jones also mentioned other ways in which Notre Dame could honor Indigenous Peoples’ Day, such as an email blast acknowledging the celebration or a special dinner at the dining halls.Marisel Moreno, associate professor of Romance languages and literatures and member of the Columbus Murals Committee, told The Observer in an email that “celebrating Indigenous Peoples’ Day… is about lifting the veil of invisibility that erases them from the present national narrative, relegating them to a distant past.”“In the midst of the social reckoning in which we find ourselves, the fight against racism — in all its forms — must confront our sanitized views of the past,” she added.Referring to the committees’ additional recommendations, Moreno said celebrating Native American heritage on a particular day would include “close collaboration with Pokagon and Potawatomi communities to plan public celebrations as well as talks and panels centering them.”While the pandemic has put some of these plans on hold, she said, “Notre Dame is committed to recognize and celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day.”Recognition of Native heritage and the University’s presence on Native land need not be confined to a single day, either. There are other tangible and symbolic ways of celebrating the contributions of Native Americans to the University, similar to those recommended by the Columbus Murals Committee.“Some universities provide free tuition to tribal peoples [whose] lands they inhabit,” Collier, NAI’s director, told The Observer. These universities including Miami University of Ohio and Florida State University.Collier also talked about the possibility of carrying out land acknowledgements at University-sponsored events such as football games.“Welcome to Notre Dame Stadium. You are in the traditional homeland of the Pokagon Potawatomi people and the home of the Fighting Irish,” he said, changing his voice to briefly adopt the role of broadcaster.About the stadium, Winchester-Jones said he thinks “it’d be cool if they had a Pokagon flag up there.”These acknowledgements would bring more business to the Pokagon Band’s Four Winds casino, Collier added, “because all of that money that they get from the casino pays for healthcare, food and housing for Pokagon people.”“We may be on the nicest piece of land in the entire Midwest,” Collier said. “So, there should be somebody that we’re thanking for that.”Tags: Christopher Columbus Day, Christopher Columbus murals, Main Building Inside the Main Building, native flora and fauna — vines, rabbits, mice, flowers, turtles and trees — decorate fabric that resembles thick, colorful tapestries. While these coverings are new, the paintings that lie underneath are almost as old as the University itself.The controversy over the Columbus Murals, painted by Luigi Gregori in the early 1880s and located by the undergraduate admissions office in Notre Dame’s Main Building, is not recent either. For years before their covering, calls to either conceal them or leave them uncovered have resonated throughout the University community.Looking backDuring her time at the University, alumna and journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones (‘98) protested the murals alongside other students of color. She then wrote a response to a Letter to the Editor that had denounced the protests.The author of the Letter to the Editor had written that “it is Columbus, and the followers of Columbus who, for all their misdeeds along the way, set up the institutions which both bring the Indians back to the natural law and introduce them to the way of salvation… God bless Columbus and his murals!”“Yes, it was Columbus that set the platforms for these racist American institutions. A devil calling someone a savage is like the pot calling the kettle black,” Hannah-Jones responded, back in 1995.In 2003, an Observer columnist wrote that the murals “celebrated genocide under the Dome.” And in the few years leading up to the historic decision to cover them, the community once again engaged in similar conversation. In 2014, The Observer’s editorial board wrote about the need to acknowledge the history between Notre Dame and Native Americans.After the Native American Student Association of Notre Dame (NASAND) protested the Columbus murals in Oct. 2017, the topic resurfaced in the campus community, spurring a series of Letters to the Editor and events that culminated in a petition signed by over 300 professors and students, calling for the removal of the murals. Activist group Rising Tide Michiana then unfurled a protest banner in Hesburgh Library.Where are we now?Then, on Jan. 2019, University President Fr. John Jenkins announced the murals would be covered — a decision that drew both support and criticism from within and outside the University. Delays in the murals’ covering also caused confusion: It was more than a year after this first announcement that the paintings were finally covered in Sept. 2020.The initial decision had been followed by the selection of a committee on Feb. 14, 2019 that would advise Fr. Jenkins on how to go about fulfilling his proposal.“The committee recommended that the installation of the mural coverings coincide with the installation of a new permanent exhibition regarding the University’s early history,” Ann Firth, vice chair of the Columbus Murals Committee and chief of staff to Fr. Jenkins, said in an email to The Observer.The initial recommendation and plan was that the permanent exhibition would be installed next to the original murals — which would already be covered — on the second floor of the Main Building, once the office of undergraduate admissions moved to McKenna Hall by 2022, according to the report. However, the COVID-19 pandemic has slowed down this process for at least a year, and perhaps for longer, Firth said.“That reality, coupled with the urgency of the national and campus dialogues on issues of racial justice as Fr. Jenkins referenced in his August 24 letter to the campus community contributed to the decision to install the coverings now, rather than at a date at least 2 years in the future,” Firth said.Because of this delay, the installation of a temporary exhibit with context regarding the murals and the coverings was also planned for Dec. 2020, Firth said.The coverings are removable so that faculty may request access to the murals for their classes and so that they can be displayed occasionally, according to the Aug. 24 letter. Besides displaying local biodiversity, the design on the coverings’ fabric is meant to “fuse the European aesthetic with that of indigenous peoples,” Firth said. Brian Collier, interim director of Native American Initiatives (NAI) and director of the American Indian Catholic Schools Network (AICSN), pointed out that the turtle is a central part of creation stories for Native Americans, as is the tree of life in Christianity. Both symbols can be seen on many of the coverings.last_img read more

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first_img 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr There are two kinds of lottery winners: Those who grow their wealth, invest in the future, and help people and organizations dear to them, leaving enough to pass on to their heirs—and the kind of people who blow it and lose it all within a few years. Hopefully, last night’s three Powerball winners will use their money wisely.Whether you play weekly, join the office pool, or swear off gambling entirely, everyone can learn a little something from those hapless souls whose lives took a turn for the worse when their lottery dreams came true.1. Carefully vet your financial advisors: Abraham Shakespeare pocketed $17 million of a $30 million jackpot in 2006. He befriended a woman, DeeDee Moore, who said she’d help “protect” his money from friends and family who were asking for handouts. She’d convinced him to transfer his money to her account, and then killed him. She was sentenced to life in prison without parole. continue reading »last_img read more

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first_imgNov 3, 2009Vaccine production reaches 31.8 million dosesTotal H1N1 vaccine availability today reached 31.8 million doses, said US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Director Dr. Thomas Frieden at a briefing, up 1.8 million doses from yesterday. “We are therefore on track to hit the 10 million increase that we had been hoping for” this week, though the total is far from satisfactory, he said. He declined to predict when the US will give vaccine doses to developing countries, saying it will depend on clarification of production.http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/?date=110309CDC H1N1 informationUptake of seasonal flu vaccine may set recordThis year’s uptake of seasonal flu vaccine is “unprecedented” and may set a record, said CDC Director Dr. Thomas Frieden at today’s H1N1 news briefing. The CDC expects that 114 million doses will be distributed by the end of the year, but the demand may be greater still, he said. He also said there are signs of a higher vaccination rate than usual among healthcare workers, who usually have only about a 40% immunization rate.http://www.cdc.gov/h1n1flu/?date=110209CDC H1N1 informationVirginia takes steps to keep voters healthyElection officials in Virginia, whose citizens vote for governor today, among other offices, are taking steps to avoid transmitting H1N1 influenza. According to the Associated Press (AP), voters will have hand sanitizer available at the polls and possibly cotton swabs or disposable coffee stirrers so they can avoid contact with touch-screen machines. Some sites also have backup election workers on standby.http://www.wtop.com/?nid=25&sid=1800896Nov 3 AP storyIndiana pigs get pandemic fluThe US Department of Agriculture (USDA) yesterday reported that four samples from Indiana pigs tested positive for pandemic H1N1 influenza. The samples were collected on Oct 22. Indiana’s state veterinarian said in a statement yesterday that the animals have recovered and are being monitored. He said workers who had contact with the animals had been sick with flulike symptoms before some of the pigs became ill.http://www.usda.gov/documents/FINAL_RESULTS_2009_PANDEMIC_H1N1_INFLUENZA_CHT.pdfNov 2 USDA reportGSK vaccine gets Saudi approvalThe Saudi Food and Drug Authority approved GlaxoSmithKline’s H1N1 vaccine yesterday, according to Reuters, as the kingdom readied for more than 2 million pilgrims at this month’s Islamic hajj. The vaccine is distributed under the Pandemrix brand.http://www.reuters.com/article/swineFlu/idUSL3692176Nov 3 Reuters storySouth African panel favors novel H1N1 in seasonal vaccineSouth Africa’s National Institute of Communicable Diseases has recommended that South Africa include the pandemic H1N1 virus in its seasonal flu vaccine for next year, according to News24, a South African online news service. Barry Schoub, director of the institute, said it would be up to the nation’s health department whether to follow the advice. Reports did not clarify whether the pandemic virus would replace the seasonal H1N1 strain in the vaccine or be added to it.http://www.news24.com/Content/World/SwineFlu/1255/d2c7bbf714634568a571e216f4bb6932/02-11-2009-08-14/H1N1_vaccine_in_flu_vaccineNov 2 News24 reportFDA issues guidance on diagnostic testsThe US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) published guidance yesterday to help manufacturers develop diagnostic tests for the novel H1N1 influenza virus. Manufacturers of tests can submit a request to the FDA for an Emergency Use Authorization (EUA). If granted, the EUA will allow the test to be used during the H1N1 pandemic. No H1N1 test is currently approved or cleared by the FDA.http://www.fda.gov/NewsEvents/Newsroom/PressAnnouncements/ucm188717.htmNov 2 FDA news releaselast_img read more

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first_img There’s no stopping Tomasz Anderson! He’s just won his seventh title on the US college circuit – only a week after his sixth win. The 22-year-old international is a student at Jacksonville State University and his latest victory came in their home event, the Grub Mart Intercollegiate at Silver Lakes in Alabama. Anderson, from Brocket Hall in Hertfordshire, shot 71 69 70 and tied for medallist honours with Western Kentucky’s Brandon Beckham on six-under par. Anderson shared fifth place after two rounds but his 70 was the best score in the field over the final 18 holes. He also won this event last year and his seventh win extends his own college record of career victories. Anderson (image © Leaderboard Photography) is a member of the England Golf men’s squad and is in the initial GB&I Walker Cup squad. He scored five wins from six on his England debut in last year’s Home Internationals in Wales. 26 Mar 2015 Super seventh college win for Anderson last_img read more

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first_imgThe county received eight bids for the project, with the highest at about $1.6 million. The county had estimated the project to cost $900,000 to $1 million.The Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) will reimburse the county 80 percent of the cost, or about $705,342, with the county and Atlantic Highlands splitting the remaining 20 percent, or about $88,168 each.The trail has remained open, but in what the Park System has described as a “primitive condition” of compacted soil. During the re-construction, that portion of the trail is to be closed.The Henry Hudson Trail runs for about 28 miles, using a combination of roads and unused railroad right-of-ways between Sandy Hook and Freehold. From Sandy Hook to Aberdeen, the trail also is known as the Bayshore Trail. By Joseph SapiaAN OCEAN COUNTY company has won a contract to restore an Atlantic Highlands section of the Henry Hudson Trail destroyed in 2012’s Super Storm Sandy.The Monmouth County Board of Recreation Commissioners recently awarded the contract to the low-bidder, Compass Construction of Plumsted. Compass bid $881,677.In October 2012, Sandy’s 14-foot surge destroyed the wooden walkway and trail surfacing, along with the bluff, on a 1-1/4-mile section of the trail from the Atlantic Highlands Municipal Harbor to Popamora Point on the Atlantic Highlands-Highlands boundary. The restoration work will include diverting runoff to Sandy Hook Bay under the trail to protect against erosion, resurfacing the trail with both pavement and stone dust, and rebuilding the walkway with prefabricated concrete.The work is to be completed in 100 days, but the actual start date, expected to be in September or October, has yet to be determined, said Joseph Sardonia, supervising landscape architect for the Monmouth County Park System.last_img read more

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first_imgThe Unknowns overcame an early-tournament loss to rout Louie’s 13-2 to capture the 2014 Nelson Mixed Slopitch Championship Sunday afternoon at the Lakeside Diamonds.The Unknowns scored early and often en route to the team’s 14th crown in the last 20 Nelson Mixed Slopitch seasons.Mallard’s Source for sports are proud to honour the Unknowns with Team of the Week accolades.The team includes,Rachel Stewart, Roman Wylie, Rob Chernenko, Lorne Wuori, Kent Smith, Shane Cutler, Jarrett Slomba, Mike Roch, Keaton Roch, Justin Willans, Tanis Bouchier-Willans, manager Joe Capriglione, Christine Wayling, Michelle Lellevre, Lauren Suomi, Luree Gould, Jayden Roch, Jaxson Slomba and Abby Bouchier-Willans.Molson Finley won the B event title while Hour Glass took home the C event crown. The Unknowns didn’t get mad, the team just got even.last_img read more

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first_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Top articles1/5READ MOREGame Center: Chargers at Kansas City Chiefs, Sunday, 10 a.m.To the northeast, fires in the San Bernardino Mountains forced the evacuation of entire communities surrounding the resort area of Lake Arrowhead. Thousands of people, including hospital patients, were forced to flee advancing flames that leaped through the mountains, burning one home after another, destroying at least 425 and threatening as many as 10,000 more, said U.S. Forest Service spokeswoman Gina Sampson. In neighboring Orange County, a fire chief lashed out at state officials, saying air support, such as tankers, might have helped control fires early on, before they burned homes, if it had been available. It wasn’t because so many fires struck California almost simultaneously beginning last weekend. “There is not enough resources to go around … because of the number of fires that are going on in our state right now,” said Orange County Fire Authority Chief Chip Prather. He said a dozen firefighters battling blazes in the Irvine and Lake Forest areas had to deploy emergency shelters, a last resort when they are surrounded by flames, or take cover in buildings. “They should not have had to do that,” he said. “If we’d had the resources earlier to take care of those lines with hand crews, we wouldn’t have been in that situation.” Prather’s comments came minutes before Gov. Arnold Schwarzenegger, touring fire damage in Lake Arrowhead, promised more help, including more people and equipment. When asked about the fire chief’s critical remarks, the governor said: “I’m not aware of that.” Berlant defended his agency’s actions, saying it had gone on high alert late last week and shifted resources to the San Diego area in advance of the forecasted Santa Ana winds. On Tuesday, the fire agency took the additional step of suspending the closing of the fire season in Northern California, a maneuver allowing it to send virtually every state fire engine, some from as far as 800 miles away, to battle the Southern California fires. Caravans of fire engines could be seen rolling down Interstate 5 – more than 500 miles and a day’s drive from the closest blaze. Meanwhile, in San Diego County, site of the only death so far, an additional 530 homes were reported damaged. Besides the one person killed by the flames, the San Diego County Medical Examiner’s Officer listed four deaths as connected to the wildfires. Three were people in their 90s who died from natural causes; the fourth was a woman who died after falling at a restaurant. All are considered fire-connected deaths because they occurred during or after evacuations. The fire victim was identified as Thomas Varshock of Tecate, a town on the U.S. side of the border across from the Mexican city of the same name southeast of San Diego, the San Diego County Medical Examiner’s Office said. Authorities had told him to evacuate, but he didn’t leave and authorities left to take care of other evacuations, the Medical Examiner’s Office said. There were 45 injuries reported throughout Southern California, including at least 21 firefighters. The University of California, San Diego Medical Center Regional Burn Center was treating 16 patients from the San Diego County fires, including three firefighters and four others in critical condition. With some 375,000 acres, or 585 square miles, ablaze, President George W. Bush declared a federal emergency for seven Southern California counties, a move that will speed disaster-relief efforts. He also scheduled a visit to the region Thursday. Meanwhile, the Department of Defense agreed to send six Air Force and Air National Guard water- or retardant-dropping planes. Fire crews and fleeing residents described desperate conditions that were sure to get worse. Temperatures across Southern California were about 10 degrees above average and approached 100 degrees Tuesday in Orange and San Diego counties, where sustained Santa Ana winds gusted in some areas to 65mph. The fires were exploding and shooting embers before them in all directions, preventing crews from forming traditional fire lines and greatly limiting aerial bombardment. In Orange County, flames tore through Modjeska Canyon, forcing firefighters to take cover and destroying homes. “Our house is still there right now but there are only six houses on our street that are still standing,” said Vallary Townsell, 25, who lives in the canyon and works as a reporter with local cable TV Channel 3. Thousands of residents throughout Southern California sought shelter at fairgrounds, schools and community centers. The largest gathering was at Qualcomm Stadium in San Diego, where evacuees anxiously watched the stadium’s television sets, hoping for a glimpse of their neighborhood on the local news. The clubhouse at the famous Del Mar racetrack was converted into a shelter. Hundreds of people stared at television sets blaring reports from the fire lines and damaged neighborhoods. Many dozed on cots, their countless pets penned in with temporary fencing. “We’re going crazy trying to get back into our apartment just to see what kind of damage we’ve got,” said Tim Harrington, who arrived at the racetrack with his wife, son and their two pet rats. “Then we’ll pick up the pieces from there.” Just outside the clubhouse, barns that usually house thoroughbred race horses sheltered a variety of large animals. “I’d say spirits are pretty good. The biggest question is, `When can we go back to our homes?’ We have to tell them we have no idea. All we can tell them to do is to watch those TVs,” volunteer coordinator Beverly Ferree said. By Tuesday evening, residents were being allowed back into two evacuated neighborhoods in San Diego – Del Mar Heights, near the ocean, and Scripps Ranch – as well as an evacuated portion of the city of Poway. No homes were lost in these particular neighborhoods. Public schools were closed, as were campuses at the University of California, San Diego, and San Diego State University. National Guard troops were manning highway checkpoints in San Diego County. At Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, about 40 aircraft that included F-18 fighter jets, C-130 cargo planes and Marine helicopters were evacuated to other bases in California and Arizona. At nearby Camp Pendleton, two fires were burning – one near the air station and the other in a training area, a base spokesman said. Families in four military housing areas on the base were told to be ready to evacuate. The scope of the infernos was immense and was reminiscent of the blazes that tore through Southern California four years ago this month, killing 22 people and destroying 3,640 homes. As the fires spread, most out-of-control, smaller blazes were merging into larger, more fearsome blazes. The winds – which sweep through Southern California’s canyons in fall and winter – are stronger than normal, turning already parched scrubland into tinder. Schwarzenegger, Homeland Security Secretary Michael Chertoff, Federal Emergency Management Agency Administrator R. David Paulison and other officials toured burn areas in San Diego and the evacuation center at Qualcomm Stadium before holding a brief news conference. “If the weather cooperates, maybe we can turn the tide (today),” Chertoff said, adding “hopefully the wind will die down,” so firefighting aircraft grounded by strong gusts could return to the skies.160Want local news?Sign up for the Localist and stay informed Something went wrong. Please try again.subscribeCongratulations! You’re all set! SAN DIEGO – Deadly, wind-whipped wildfires have triggered the largest evacuation in state history, prompting more than 500,000 people to flee ahead of flames that destroyed more than 1,800 homes and continued Tuesday to threaten tens of thousands more. The number of people joining the mandatory exodus – and the number of homes destroyed – was expected to grow, though, as new fires started and others continued to burn a path toward the sea – through populated communities. “This is the largest mass evacuation of a natural disaster in California history,” said Daniel Berlant, spokesman for the state’s Department of Forestry and Fire Protection. In San Diego County, authorities placed evacuation calls to 346,000 homes, said Luis Monteagudo, a spokesman for the county’s emergency effort. The county estimates, based on census tracts, that approximately 560,000 people were ordered to leave. last_img
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first_imgFERNDALE >> Arguably the strongest and most competitive jockey colony in recent years figures to make the race for the 2016 Humboldt County Fair riding title a battle to the wire when the 120th meet starts Friday, Aug. 19.Three prior overall Humboldt jockey champions, an East Coast import who made a sensational debut here in 2013, a pair of “bullring” specialists from Oregon and a longtime fan favorite who boasts a pair of runner-up finishes in the local jockey title races should give patrons …last_img

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first_imgCoach Carlos Alberto Parreira has askedBafana Bafana supporters to keep up theenergy, the vibe, and the noise.(Image: MediaClubsouthafrica.com. Formore free photos, visit the image library) MEDIA CONTACTS • Morio SanyaneSafa communications director+27 82 990 0835Janine ErasmusThe 23 players that will carry the hopes of the nation in the 2010 Fifa World Cup have been announced.Coach Carlos Alberto Parreira described the whittling of five players from the current 28-man complement as one of the most difficult of his career – and he surprised the nation by leaving controversial striker Benni McCarthy out of the team.The announcement took place at media house Primedia’s premises in Johannesburg under the auspices of the National Press Club. It follows national squad Bafana Bafana’s 5-0 thrashing of Guatemala in Polokwane, Limpopo province, the evening before.Fifa has set 1 June as the deadline for all countries to submit their final 23-member teams.Besides Parreira, the South African Football Association (Safa) CEO Leslie Sedibe, Safa president Kirsten Nematandani, assistant coach Pitso “Jingles” Mosimane, and representatives from sponsors Absa Bank and South African Breweries, were also in attendance.Parreira quit as the national coach in April 2008 because of family reasons, only to be reappointed in November 2009 when his successor Joel Santana left. Before Santana’s departure, Bafana lost eight of their last nine games and dropped to their lowest Fifa ranking since 1994.However, Safa is confident that bringing Parreira back was the best possible move. “This hasn’t been an easy road for any coach,” said Nematandani to Parreira, “but the Safa executive made no mistake when we recalled you.”He encouraged the players who did not make it to the final squad by saying that they have all developed and improved immensely, and there will be another opportunity for them. The investment into developing their skills will pay off in the future.“There are 48-million people behind you,” he told the newly announced squad, “so now you must stand up and be counted.”Nematandani also urged the media to report positively about the team during the last remaining days until kick-off, to help build an atmosphere of energy and confidence that will inspire Bafana Bafana.Commitment and support“This announcement is the culmination of Bafana’s strict training regimen,” said Sedibe, “that saw them attending camps on three continents, in Brazil, Germany and Durban.”He reminded the audience that during the World Cup, South Africa plays host to the world both on and off the field and as such, it’s not just the players’ performance that needs to be top-notch.“Bafana has committed to putting on a game that is always worth watching – yesterday will attest to that statement,” said Sedibe, referring to the Bafana-Guatemala game.He thanked the South African public for their overwhelming support of the national team, mentioning the Football Fridays initiative that encourages all to wear yellow Bafana shirts at the end of the working week.“This is what nation-building is about. We saw it [at the Super 14 rugby final] in Orlando over the weekend, and yesterday in Polokwane. This is how we rally behind our team as a nation.”Sedibe spoke of Safa’s confidence that South Africa was entering the football spectacular with the best possible team, one that was backed by world-class coaching and technical expertise.Ready to make the country proudBesides McCarthy, the four that didn’t make it are defenders Bryce Moon and Innocent Mdledle, goalkeeper Rowen Fernandez and midfielder Franklin Cale. They were informed of the coach’s decision on 31 May.Parreira said that every player deserved to be in the final team, and it was not a matter of one being better than another. Rather, factors such as team dynamics, discipline and physical condition were applied in making the selection.“Our goal is to go as far as we can in the World Cup,” he said, “and we are ready to make you proud.” He said that he was happy with the players’ improvement, and felt that, with an average of three goals per game in their last four games, the team was ready.Parreira added that Bafana Bafana were looking to their fans to create their usual spirited vibe in the stadiums. “We need the vuvuzela – it is our 12th man, and it will help us a lot.”Bafana Bafana final squad:Goalkeepers: Itumeleng Khune (Kaizer Chiefs), Moeneeb Josephs (Orlando Pirates), Shu-Aib Walters (Maritzburg United)Defenders:Siboniso Gaxa (Mamelodi Sundowns), Matthew Booth (Mamelodi Sundowns), Lance Davids (Ajax Cape Town), Lucas Thwala (Orlando Pirates), Aaron Mokoena (captain) (Portsmouth), Bongani Khumalo (SuperSport United), Siyabonga Sangweni (Golden Arrows), Tsepo Masilela (Maccabi Haifa), Anele Ngcongca (Racing Genk)Midfielders: Steven Pienaar (Everton), Teko Modise (Orlando Pirates), Siphiwe Tshabalala (Kaizer Chiefs), Reneilwe Letsholonyane (Kaizer Chiefs), Thanduyise Khuboni (Golden Arrows), Kagisho Dikgaco (Fulham), Macbeth Sibaya (Rubin Kazan), Surprise Moriri (Mamelodi Sundowns)Strikers:Katlego Mphela (Mamelodi Sundowns), Bernard Parker (FC Twente), Siyabonga Nomvethe (Moroka Swallows) (Image: MediaClubsouthafrica.com.For more free photos, visit the image library)last_img read more

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first_imgPINEHURST, North Carolina — Michalle Wie and Lexi Thompson are the only two players under par at the U.S. Women’s Open after Friday’s second round at the demanding Pinehurst course.Wie finished with back-to-back birdies for a 2-under 68 to give her a three-stroke lead at 4-under 136, while Lexi Thompson ran off three straight birdies to match her for the lowest score une 20 and remain in touch.Their second-round performances perhaps set up a rematch from the first major of the year when Thompson soundly beat Wie in the final round at the Kraft Nabisco Championship.“Definitely too early,” Thompson said. “Thirty-six holes in a major, that’s a lot of golf to be played, especially at a U.S. Women’s Open.”Wie relied on her table-top putting stance to twice make long par saves. She finished with a 6-iron that set up a 12-foot birdie putt, and a 15-foot birdie on the par-5 ninth to reach 4-under 136.“It’s a grind out there. It’s not easy,” Wie said. “Really grateful for the par putts that I made and some of the birdie putts that I made. I can’t complain. I’ll take it.”Just when it looked as if Wie might run away with it, Thompson pulled off a remarkable shot to remain in contention.From the sand and bushes left of the fairway on the par-5 fifth hole, Thompson blasted a 5-iron from 195 yards just off the green, setting up two putts for birdie from about 60 feet.That was her third straight birdie, and she closed with four pars.Stacy Lewis, the No. 1 player in women’s golf who opened with a bogey-free 67, picked up a bogey on her first hole in a wild round of six bogeys, three birdies and a tough 73.“I hung around, and that’s what you’ve got to do at this tournament,” said Lewis, at even-par with Amy Yang (69) and Minjee Lee, the 18-year-old amateur from Australia who played bogey-free on the back nine to salvage a 71.Lucy Li, the precocious 11-year-old and youngest qualifier in the history of the U.S. Women’s Open, started with a double bogey for the second straight day and shot another 78 to miss the cut.The cut was 9-over 149.Na Yeon Choi had a 70 and was at 1-over 141, followed by a Paula Creamer (72) at 2-over 142. The group at 143 included Karrie Webb (73) and So Yeon Ryu, who saved her hopes with three straight birdies on the front nine. All of them are former Women’s Open champions.“When you think seven shots, you think that’s a lot,” Webb said after battling for a 73, leaving her seven shots behind. “But really at the U.S. Open, I don’t think that’s too far out.”Wie is in contention on the weekend in her second straight major. The last time that happened was when she was 16 and had a chance in three of them. Wie already has won this year in Hawaii, and she has eight top 10s and is No. 2 on the LPGA money list.Attribute that to a putting stroke that she owns, no matter how peculiar it looks with her back bent severely, almost parallel to the ground.“You look at the way Michelle has played the last six months and you look at her differently,” Lewis said. “She’s become one of the best ball-strikers on tour. She hits it really consistent. She knows where the ball’s going. And she’s figuring out how to win. That’s the big thing.”(DOUG FERGUSON, AP Golf Writer)TweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

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