May 12, 2021
  • 5:53 am The effect of vertical migration strategy on retention and dispersion in the Irish Sea during spring–summer
  • 5:50 am The basal roughness of Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica
  • 5:48 am Tracking fitness in marine vertebrates: current knowledge and opportunities for future research
  • 5:47 am Coastal barium cycling at the West Antarctic Peninsula
  • 5:59 am Tour bus headed to Masters overturns, driver charged with DUI: Officials

first_imgSince graduating from Harvard in 2003, installation artist Liz Glynn has earned an M.F.A. (California Institute of the Arts) and has had exhibits in New York, Austin, San Francisco, and Los Angeles (now her hometown). She has had art residencies at O’Artoteca in Milan and the Atlantic Center for the Arts in Florida. Glynn has also picked up representation at galleries on the East and West coasts. Her work is featured in “Sculpture,” an exhibition through March 5 at the Paula Cooper Gallery in Manhattan.But Glynn has taken time off to work again in the Carpenter Center, the iconic modernist Le Corbusier building on Quincy Street where she spent four years doing studio work as a student in Visual and Environmental Studies (VES). Through Saturday (Feb. 5), Glynn is this year’s Josep Lluis Sert Practitioner in the Arts, a visiting artist position in place at VES since 1986. The idea: welcome a working artist for a week of intense interchange with students.For such a busy person, Glynn chose to do something that is at least suggestive of rest. Her “Corbusier Furniture Project” involves building two replica tubular steel chairs modeled after the great Swiss designer’s leather-covered LC-2 fauteuil grand confort, petit modèle — or, “great comfort sofa, small model.” One is in place already, in the Carpenter Center’s main gallery, where Glynn’s work joins that of two other VES graduates in a show called “Object Lessons” (through Feb. 20). The other, with the help of her students, will be ready Thursday (Feb. 3).But don’t expect comfort from what Glynn calls “On the Museum’s Ruin (Morris Hunt – Corbusier – Piano),” 2011. This LC-2 is made of a replica frame and five cast blocks of rubble from the Fogg Museum renovation going on next door on Quincy Street. It’s spiky and lumpy. And don’t sit down on it anyway. Despite tipping the scales at 400 pounds, the chair is not designed to bear weight.But the chair is designed to remind Harvard that its traditional architecture met the “aggression of modernism” not long ago, said Glynn. And the Carpenter Center is the highest expression of that modernism on campus, she added — a welcoming, affecting space despite its stark layout and concrete structure. “I fell in love with it.”But a cast chair is never just a cast chair. It’s a learning opportunity. To make the first chair, Glynn experimented with 16 different formulas to cast the blocks of rubble into usable blocks. She’ll pass on what she learned to her 15 students, and add in lessons on the history of the casting and concrete from ancient to modern times.last_img read more

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first_imgHarvard has gathered resources and help guides for students, faculty, and the University community after its Tuesday announcement that students should not plan to return to campus after spring break ends March 23, and that classes will move online for the rest of the semester amid the mushrooming outbreak of the COVID-19 virus.The material, much of which is available on the University’s coronavirus page, includes information for students about moving, storage, shipping, and booking travel, as well as help for faculty and staff on remote learning and workforce planning, and meetings, events, and travel guidance for the entire community.“Please know the College is working hard to support you and respond to the needs of our community in the midst of this rapidly evolving situation,” said Rakesh Khurana, Danoff Dean of Harvard College. “We are committed to sharing as much information as possible with you as we learn more.”The University made its decision as the number of cases in both the U.S. and across the globe continued to surge. In the U.S., there are about 1,000 cases, according the Centers for Disease Control. That number is expected to rise as more testing is implemented. There are currently 95 known cases in Massachusetts. Globally the World Health Organization puts the number of cases at more than 118,000.Harvard’s decision is consistent with the recommendations of leading health officials on social-distancing and slowing the spread of the disease. More than 100 other colleges around the nation have opted to adopt remote instruction, according to published reports. The Ivy League Council of Presidents has canceled all athletic events through the remainder of the spring semester, and the NCAA has banned spectators from its famed March Madness men’s and women’s basketball tournaments.“These past few weeks have been a powerful reminder of just how connected we are to one another — and how our choices today determine our options tomorrow,” wrote Harvard President Larry Bacow in a letter to the community Tuesday morning.Harvard College students have been asked not to return to campus after spring break and to move out of their Houses and first-year dorms by Sunday. Remote instruction is set to begin March 23.Currently, Harvard has no documented coronavirus, but today the University announced two community members are being tested.“The decision to move to virtual instruction was not made lightly,” Bacow wrote. “The goal of these changes is to minimize the need to gather in large groups and spend prolonged time in close proximity with each other in spaces such as classrooms, dining halls, and residential buildings.”Khurana said the Faculty of Arts and Sciences has decided that all major academic deadlines, including Senior Thesis due dates, will be extended by one week in order to allow students to focus on moving and making other necessary adjustments. He also noted that room and board will be prorated for all students who move out and that the University is reviewing a small number of applications by students seeking to remain on campus longer because of difficulties related with returning home.Harvard College is providing students on financial aid with up to $200 to ship items home. Students should email the Registrar’s Office, [email protected], to receive prepaid shipping labels. Students should include their name, local or campus address, the address to which the boxes will be sent, contact information for both sender and receiver, dimensions of the boxes, and date they will be leaving campus.Students can also forgo shipping and store items through Olympia Moving and Storage. The University’s storage instructions page has pricing and detailed instructions. Students on financial aid will receive a $200 credit for storage if they choose this option instead of shipping. If the bill exceeds $200, or the student does not receive financial aid, costs will be applied to term bills.Students can print labels for boxes at any Crimson Print location.For students who need help booking travel, the University has staff at all of the dining halls, the Smith Campus Center, and Dudley Community in DeWolfe. Times vary, so students should check the schedule regularly.The University has also posted several coronavirus update and FAQ pages, which are refreshed regularly, including pages for the University as a whole, the College, and other parts of the University from the Faculty of Arts and Sciences to the Extension School. These pages have answers to community-specific questions — like how to keep research and labs going remotely.College and graduate students with questions about financial aid should visit the financial aid FAQ page. It has information on room and board, student fees, stipends, and what to do if a student can’t afford travel.With the move to online learning, Zoom training is available to faculty members. Faculty have been asked to sign up for a Zoom account and complete training no later than March 20. A number of training sessions are available online and in person, including a video tutorial, a workshop, office hours, and one-on-one help. Harvard University IT has been working with Zoom to ensure the system can handle the high demand.“We are committed to residential education and appreciate that the classroom experience cannot be fully replicated online,” said Claudine Gay, the Edgerley Family Dean of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, in an email to faculty. “However, remote teaching is an important and powerful tool in our contingency planning as we look to maintain the continuity of our teaching and the academic progress of our students.”Over the past few weeks, Harvard has asked staff who are able to work remotely to begin preparing to do so. Those preparations include bringing laptops home every day and taking steps to ensure personal devices are secure, and reviewing the general information about getting ready to work remotely.The University has also issued travel and meeting and event guidance to the community. It has banned all work-related travel until at least April 30 and is strongly discouraging nonessential personal travel. University events or meetings of 25 people or more are discouraged.For the latest information, please visit www.harvard.edu/coronavirus.Since the initial outbreak of the coronavirus, the Gazette has been providing regular updates from Harvard specialists in epidemiology, infectious disease, economics, politics, and other disciplines. You can find these updates here: https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/series/coronavirus/. The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news.last_img read more

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first_imgThe parliamentary committee is made up of 11 MPs from across the three main parties.In other news, the Merchant Navy Officers Pension Fund (MNOPF) has rolled out a new payroll service that incorporates members’ other pension sources into one, ensuring members only receive one simplified payment.The system was introduced after the scheme formally wound up its Old Section of the defined benefit scheme with a £25m insurance buy-in. The £1.3bn Old Section is now fully insured with Rothesay Life and Legal & General.MNOPF said, as a result of the insurance buy-ins and buyout, some members will have had three separate insurance policies, leading to the new payroll system’s rollout.Lastly, the pension scheme for the British Medical Association (BMA) has appointed Buck Consultants to provide investment consultancy servies.The trustees of the BMA Staff Pension Scheme has around £300m in assets, servicing roughly 1,300 members.Buck is expected to provide the fund with investment advice, fund manager research and manager selection. The UK’s parliamentary backbench policy-scrutinising committee is to hold an inquiry into the progress of auto-enrolment. The Work & Pensions Select Committee, chaired by Labour MP Dame Anne Begg, will gather information and industry views on the progress of the policy.The committee’s last inquiry was in 2012, as the policy was rolled out among the UK’s largest employers.This latest inquiry will look into the lessons learned, issues for smaller employers, progress with automatic transfers, improving governance and administration and the implications of tax changes and introducing defined ambition.last_img read more

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first_imgGlenn Ray “Fred” Miller 54, of Aurora, Indiana, passed away Sunday December 2, 2018 in Lawrenceburg, Indiana.He was born September 13, 1964 in Lawrenceburg, IN, son of Robert “Bob” Buffington and the late Sandra (Miller) Buffington.Glenn is survived by his father, Robert “Bob” Buffington; sister, Mary (Matt) Schwarz of Greendale, IN; and 2 children; and a nieceBrittany Schwarz.He was preceded in death by his mother, Sandra Buffington, sister, Laura Buffington, grandmother, Milred Woodward and grandmother, Mary Elza Lloyd..A memorial visitation will be held on Thursday, December 20, 2018 from 5-7 pm at Rullman Hunger Funeral Home.A memorial service will follow at 7 pm with Pastor Tommy Beatley officiating.Contributions may be made to defray funeral expenses. Please call the funeral home office at (812) 926-1450 and we will notify the family of your donation with a card.Visit: www.rullmans.comlast_img read more

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first_imgAn 18-year-old woman has been arrested after she threw a knife at her mother when her parents confronted her about having marijuana.The incident occurred at a home in Sunny Isles on Sunday.According to the report, Emily Frishman went to the kitchen and grabbed two knives after her mother and father confronted her about have marijuana. She then went to her room and closed the door. That’s when he mother reportedly went to the door and asked “why are you acting so crazy.” That’s when Frishman reportedly opened the room door and threw the knife at her mother. The mother dodged the knife and then called the police.When authorities arrived, Frishman told officials that she threw the knife outside of the door but did not aim at her mother.She has since been charged with aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and is currently being held on a $5,000 bond.last_img read more

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first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0Submitted by The City of OlympiaOlympia Mayor Stephen Buxbaum has been invited to serve as a delegate to the Climate Summit for Local Leaders Dec. 4 in Paris, France. The Summit is being held in connection with the United Nations Climate Change Conference, also known as the 21st Conference of the Parties (COP21).As noted in the invitation letter from Paris Mayor Anne Hidalgo: “The Climate Summit for Local Leaders will ensure that the efforts and solutions delivered by global cities and local governments are making a difference for the outcome of COP21.On Nov. 4, Buxbaum declared Olympia’s commitment to goals of the Compact of Mayors, a global coalition of mayors and city officials pledging to reduce local greenhouse gas emissions and enhance resilience to climate change—and track their progress transparently.“The Compact of Mayors reinforces our city’s commitment to its people, its businesses and the environment,” Buxbaum said. “Through the Compact, we strengthen our pledge to reduce local greenhouse gas emissions, create ambitious climate targets, track progress and enhance Olympia’s climate resilience. With consistent, public reporting of our city’s climate data, we will show how our actions can effect real change.”last_img read more

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