May 12, 2021
  • 5:53 am The effect of vertical migration strategy on retention and dispersion in the Irish Sea during spring–summer
  • 5:50 am The basal roughness of Pine Island Glacier, West Antarctica
  • 5:48 am Tracking fitness in marine vertebrates: current knowledge and opportunities for future research
  • 5:47 am Coastal barium cycling at the West Antarctic Peninsula
  • 5:59 am Tour bus headed to Masters overturns, driver charged with DUI: Officials

first_img Fauci, Farmer, and Kim discuss coronavirus lessons so far In 2018, public and moral philosopher Martha C. Nussbaum received the award for her framework for thinking about human capabilities and exploring vulnerability, fear and anger in moral and political life. Last year, former Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States Ruth Bader Ginsburg was recognized for her life’s work in pioneering gender equality and strengthening the rule of law. This year’s Berggruen Prize Jury, headed by Appiah, is an international group of authors and thinkers including Antonio Damasio, Yuk Hui, Elif Shafak, David Chalmers, Amy Gutmann, and Wang Hui. The institute announced that the work and ideas of Paul Farmer will be celebrated in a virtual talk moderated by their event partners BBC News World Service in late spring 2021.  Event details are expected to be announced in February 2021. Related Paul Farmer, the Kolokotrones University Professor and chair of the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine in the Blavatnik Institute at Harvard Medical School, was selected as the winner of the 2020 Berggruen Prize for Philosophy and Culture. The $1 million award, announced Dec. 16 by the Berggruen Prize Jury, is given annually to thinkers whose ideas have profoundly shaped human self-understanding and advancement in a rapidly changing world. Farmer was chosen for his impactful work at the intersection of public health and human rights. “We are proud to award Dr. Paul Farmer the Berggruen Prize for transforming how we think about infectious diseases, social inequality and caring for others while standing in solidarity with them. He has reshaped our understanding not just of what it means to be sick or healthy but also of what it means to treat health as a human right and the ethical and political obligations that follow,” said Kwame Anthony Appiah, chairman of the Berggruen Prize jury and professor of philosophy and law at New York University.Farmer is the author of 12 books written throughout a nearly 30-year career in building lifesaving medical care systems in resource-poor communities, most notably in Haiti and West Africa. This lifetime of global health expertise has been instrumental in understanding and addressing the complexities of the coronavirus pandemic. Bringing vast experience from the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, he and his colleagues at Partners In Health designed and implemented the COVID-19 response in Massachusetts, centered around an intensive contact tracing program inclusive of resource coordinators to help people isolate safely. This approach was widely adopted by dozens of other states. “As both thinker and actor, Dr. Paul Farmer has connected the philosophical articulation of human rights to the practical pursuit of health,” said Nicolas Berggruen, chairman of the Berggruen Institute. “He has done this on the basis of new ideas and new analyses and also by connecting the human experience and practical politics of health to enduring challenges of human rights and justice. Not least, he has led by impressive moral example as an educator, a leader and a physician.”As the fifth winner of the prize, Farmer was selected from hundreds of nominees including some of the world’s most renowned thinkers spanning the fields of philosophy, social science, global justice, bioethics and beyond, the institute announced.In both theory and practice, Farmer has worked to change how the world thinks about health and disease. In AIDS and Accusation, Farmer addressed how disease was entangled with place and social relations by examining the profoundly interactive effects of social structure and biology. Farmer remained active in the struggle against AIDS, breaking new ground in linking analysis of gender, drugs and poverty. His lifelong commitment to Haiti is manifest both in his medical practice and in Haiti after the Earthquake, which remains among the most important analyses of when international assistance works and when it doesn’t. In Pathologies of Power, Farmer connected the struggle for better health to the pursuit of human rights bringing a crucial new dimension to our understanding of global public health which is also evident in his newest book, “Fevers, Feuds, and Diamonds: Ebola and the Ravages of History.”In 1983, he began his lifelong commitment to Haiti while still a student working with dispossessed farmers in Haiti’s Central Plateau. He served there for 10 years as medical director of a charity hospital, Good Savior Hospital. As a co-founder of Partners In Health, Farmer has led colleagues working in 12 sites throughout Haiti and 12 additional countries for the past 26 years. Founded in 1987, Partners in Health has become a model for health care for poor communities worldwide and provides the basis for developing a science of global health delivery implementation.“Most recently, Dr. Farmer demonstrates how best to address this pandemic and prevent future ones. Dr. Farmer’s call to improve public health systems is a matter not only of science but also of politics, economics, and ethics,” said Amy Gutmann, Berggruen prize juror and president of the University of Pennsylvania. “In this crisis, like the ones that preceded it, our knowledge far outpaces our will to put effective solutions into action. Farmer has shown that health and health care disparities worsen the pandemic, and he calls for the social as well as medical support needed by all communities ravaged by coronavirus. He also emphasizes — while doing all in his own power to address — the special burden of caregivers. And he helps explain why, for all its importance, the arrival of vaccines will not replace the need for basic public health measures.”Farmer is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and recently served as the United Nations special adviser to the secretary-general on community-based medicine and lessons from Haiti. Farmer is also HMS professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Global Health Equityat Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Established by philanthropist Nicolas Berggruen in 2016, the Berggruen Prize for Philosophy and Culture was first awarded to Canadian philosopher Charles Taylor for his impact on the humanities, social sciences and public affairs in deepening understanding among different intellectual traditions and civilization. Baroness O’Neill of Bengarve was the 2017 Berggruen Prize laureate for her work as a citizen philosopher who has elevated the quality of public life and improved the very vocabulary of public discourse. Researchers and public health experts unite to bring clarity to key metrics guiding coronavirus response Paul Farmer on Partners In Health, ‘Harvard-Haiti,’ and making the lives of the poor the fight of his life The path to zero ‘To be horrified by inequality and early death and not have any kind of plan for responding — that would not work for me’ Vaccine close, but it likely won’t be a silver bulletlast_img read more

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first_imgThe INTERNATIONAL SAILING SCHOOL & CLUB has commissioned it’s 25th season of excellence in sail education. Located at 511 West Lakeshore Drive in Colchester, Vermont; thousands have discovered the sport of sailing with our 2 & 5 day instructional programs. Lake Champlain is a sailor’s paradise nestled between the Adirondacks & Green Mountains; Vermont’s best kept secret!!Curriculum has grown to 20 different courses for the beginning to advanced sailor. Applicable for all ages; 8 to 80; sailing is truly a life long sport — an ideal environment for family quality time. Our fleet of sailboats has expanded to accommodate our popular INTERNATIONAL SAILING CLUB. Members can sail every day without owning a boat aboard a fleet of 30 sailing craft ranging in size from 13 to 27 feet. From dinghies to pocket cruisers; we have an assortment of new membership options — racing only, beach boat only as well as weekly & monthly memberships. Rates vary as per membership; but are extremely attractive when compared to boat ownership expense. Check us out on the web at www.vermontsailingschool.com(link is external) or call Robin Doyle @ (802) 864-9065 or e-mail: [email protected](link sends e-mail)Discover the sailing lifestyle this summer!!! It’s a lifetime sport the whole family can enjoy.last_img read more

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first_imgFACT SHEET”State Leadership in Healthcare Act”Section 1332 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act ‘ the ‘Waiver for State Innovation’ ‘ allows states to waiver out of some of the requirement of federal health reform if they meet certain standards.  The provision in the new law was authored by Sens. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and strongly supported by Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) and Rep. Peter Welch (D-Vt.).The Sanders-Leahy-Welch ‘State Leadership in Healthcare Act’ moves the availability of state waivers from 2017 to 2014.  This would allow a state to avoid the expense of setting up an exchange ‘ which is otherwise required in every state in 2014 ‘ only to dismantle it later.The federal waiver would allow a state to:a) Collect all the federal funding and use for financing coverage for individuals through a plan designed by and for that state.b) Coordinates this waiver process with Medicare, Medicaid and CHIP waiver processes that may be required depending on the design of the system.  The state The federal waiver would not allow a state to:a) Offer lower quality or less affordable care to their residents than would be available in the exchange.b) Obtain waivers from the health insurance market reforms implemented under the law such as those benefiting ending the use of pre-existing conditions to exclude individuals from coverage or those allowing young adults to stay on their parents’ plans longer.How does the waiver provision of the law work?Step 1: The state passes a law to provide health insurance to its citizens.Step 2: The Secretary of Health and Human Services and Secretary of the Treasury review the state law and determine that the plan is:a) At least as comprehensive as its residents would receive in the exchange;b) At least as affordable; c) Deficit neutral to the federal government; and,d) Covers at least as many people.Step 3: If the federal government finds that the alternative state system meets these requirements without certain federal rules, states can get a waiver.  The state plan could receive waivers from:a) The section requiring establishment of the exchangeb) The designs for how federal subsidies would have to reduce premiums and co-pays.c) The employer penalty for providing coveraged) The individual mandate. Flanking Governor Peter Shumlin at a Statehouse press conference, the Vermont congressional delegation today announced federal legislation to let states in 2014 provide better health care at less cost.A provision by U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) in the new federal health care law allows states to propose pilot programs in 2017. Now Vermont’s congressional delegates ‘ Sen. Patrick Leahy (D), Sanders, and Rep. Peter Welch (D) ‘ have drafted a bill to authorize federal waivers three years sooner. Sanders will introduce the bill in the Senate for himself and Leahy, and Welch will introduce the bill in the House.Sanders said, ‘At a time when 50 million Americans lack health insurance and when the cost of health care continues to soar, it is my strong hope that Vermont will lead the nation in a new direction through a Medicare-for-all single-payer approach. The goal is clear: quality, cost-effective health care for all Vermonters. This is essential not only for the wellbeing of all Vermonters but for job creation.  We must do all we can to lower the crushing costs of health care that are now devastating Vermont businesses and their employees. I look forward to working with Sen. Leahy and Rep. Welch to get the appropriate waivers and flexibility for us to go forward toward a single-payer system.’Welch said, ‘When Vermont innovates, the nation often follows our lead. Providing Vermont and other states with the flexibility to build upon health care reform will result in better care and greater access at a lower cost. Allowing us to become a laboratory for innovation and excellence will help Vermonters, while once again allowing us to lead the way.’Leahy said, ‘While some in Washington are trying to turn the clock back on health reform, Vermont instead is moving forward.  This state waiver bill will give Vermont and other states the choice to go above and beyond what the federal health care law does by devising their own reforms.  Vermont has always been a leader in health care quality and access, and this bill will give our state the flexibility we want to offer Vermonters the best care and coverage while controlling costs.’Shumlin said The Affordable Care Act ‘will bring Vermont critical money to make our health care system work better and to cover some of the uninsured.  We want to do it better and faster than the federal law contemplates. We want to control costs and cover everyone. I am so pleased that our congressional delegation supports us in this effort, and I thank them for introducing this important legislation.  This is just the beginning of this process, and there are other waivers we will need to get it done.  If we work together, I am convinced we can persuade the federal government they should not stand in our way.”This press conference came one day before a report is to be delivered to the state Legislature by William Hsiao, the Harvard University economist, outlining health care options for Vermont that could require a federal waiver to be implemented.The new national health law will provide insurance for 32 million more Americans and make other significant strides, but Leahy, Sanders and Welch said Congress and the Obama administration should let states make additional improvements. Under their bill, states would be able to seek U.S. Health and Human Services Department approval to implement pilot health care systems beginning in 2014.  To qualify, state plans would have to be at least as comprehensive and affordable as the federal model and cover at least as many people. States could not offer lower quality or less affordable coverage. A single-payer system like Vermont is considering or any other state initiative could not cause the federal government to incur more costs.The waiver provision also requires HHS to create a coordinated process so states in a single application also could seek waivers already available under Medicare, Medicaid, and the children’s health insurance program. A fact sheet on the new ‘State Leadership in Healthcare Act’ is available HERE.  Source: Congressional delegation. MONTPELIER, Vt., Jan. 18, 2011 ‘last_img read more

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first_img SANTIAGO, Chile — Second Cpl. Arturo Rivera was deactivating mines along Chile’s northern border with Peru when an anti-personnel mine exploded, injuring him badly. Fortunately, the 25-year-old soldier survived — but the Aug. 14 accident was only the latest reminder that after nearly four decades, the existence of landmines in the border region is an unresolved issue. On May 26, an anti-personnel mine exploded near the border when a passing vehicle drove over it. According to Chilean police, the vehicle was apparently on its way to Peru, loaded with contraband. The blast, which killed one person, took place in the Chacalluta area, where only 16.2 percent of landmines have been removed, according to the National Demining Commission (CNAD in Spanish). Even though such accidents keep happening, the process of landmine removal has been slower than anticipated. Under the Ottawa Convention, Chile was given eight years to deactivate the estimated 122,000 anti-personnel and 60,000 anti-tank mines installed mainly along its borders. However, in late November 2011, President Sebastian Piñera requested an eight-year extension, giving the country until March 2020 to get rid of the mines. Heavy flooding dislodges hundreds of mines The problem became more acute following heavy rains in February, which caused the Lluta River to flood, dislodging hundreds of anti-personnel and anti-tank mines along the border with Peru. Two mines planted during the 1970s washed onto the Pan-American Highway, forcing authorities to close the road; soldiers later detonated the mines. “This is a precise job,” Ximena Valcarce, acting governor of Arica and Parinacota, told ADN Radio. “It is very tedious and takes a long time.” The arrival of Defense Minister Andres Allamand in Arica and the closure of the Chacalluta border pass underscored the seriousness of the Quebrado Escritos landmine emergency. Allamand said that during the last five years, special Chilean Army and Navy units had stepped up their mine removal operations. Separately, Col. Javier Iturriaga, commander of the Rancagua regiment, said in a communiqué that the floodwaters had dislodged 157 landmines, including 15 anti-tank mines and 142 anti-personnel mines. New legislation to compensate landmine victims Chilean lawmakers will soon consider a proposed bill to help those injured by landmines. “We have taken an additional step … to compensate victims of these devices,” Finance Minister Felipe Larraín told reporters. “This is what we have done, covering not only the obligations of the Ottawa Convention but those of the Oslo Convention, which deals with cluster bombs, and also with other international accords requiring countries with accidents originating from military explosives to provide a system of assistance.” The proposed bill offers victims monetary compensation as well as educational grants, access to social and labor resources, and free medical and psychological care. Allamand is to explain the legislation to the Senate Defense Commission at an Oct. 2 hearing. Sen. Guido Girardi, of Chile’s Party for Democracy, is urging that landmine removal be speeded up. “We are in peacetime and there is no justification for the country’s population and especially tourists to be anywhere there are land mines. We ask Minister Allamand that this be a priority and that Chile become, in the shortest time possible, a country without land mines,” said Girardi. “We know it is expensive and difficult, but these risks are not justified.” NGO: Landmines have killed 150 people since 1970s The Chilean Army and Navy are the institutions in charge of landmine removal, while the president’s National Landmine Removal Commission is supposed to coordinate their activities in accordance with the Ottawa Convention. In addition, several private civilian firms in Chile remove landmines under authorization from the Ministry of Defense. Col. Juan Mendoza, the commission’s executive secretary, said that “to date we have removed approximately 25 percent [of all mines], but many factors, especially climate and weather, have prevented us from moving at the speed we would have wanted.” Some 150 people, including 70 civilians, have been killed or maimed since the landmines were planted, according to Centro Zona Minada, a non-governmental organization. The NGO’s director, Elir Rojas Calderón, said at least 60,000 devices were planted in the Quebrada Escritos area alone. All told, he estimated, 100,000 anti-personnel mines, more than 60,000 anti-tank mines and “an undetermined number of unexploded or abandoned military explosives and cluster bombs” are scattered across six regions of Chile. Rojas: Chile has “ethical obligation” to remove landmines Chile, along with Argentina, Bolivia and Peru, has promised to comply with the Ottawa Convention, which prohibits the use, storage, production and transfer of landmines. In Peru, said Rojas, more than 20,000 landmines were planted along electrical transmission towers and the perimeters of prisons. He said that in October 1973, then-President Augusto Pinochet — fearing an attack by Peruvian forces — ordered thousands of mines to be planted on Chile’s border with Peru. “It was the same situation in 1978 during the Beagle Channel dispute in Chile’s extreme southern region, in the face of a possible attack by Argentina,” he said. “Areas bordering Bolivia and northern Argentina were later planted with landmines as well.” Chile must comply with the Ottawa Convention, said Rojas, because it has “an ethical and legal obligation to eliminate the risk to people, the environment, wildlife and the country’s development.” Thanks to “Diálogo” to share and show this information about landmines problem in Chile.. This month also is the 20º Anniversary of International Campaign to Ban Landmines with a important network of people, volunteers and professionals, NGOs and many others supporting our jobs everyday around the world.The media have a important role because help to show a different topics on demining process in the world. Thanks also to Oddete Magnet a very respected Journalist in Chile, excellent article.Elir Rojas Calderón, Degree on Geography-GeographerNational Director of Landmines-UXOs Research Center (from 1998 working on humanitarian demining)Chile MY PERSONAL OPINION IS THAT SHOULD CHILEANS DEACTIVATE ALL THE MINES THAT THEY INSTALLED UNDER THE PRETEXT OF ‘SECURITY,’ BECAUSE THOSE MINES GO AGAINST COUNTRIES AND INNOCENT HUMAN BEINGS. THE OPPOSITE WOULD BE THAT THE NEIGHBOR COUNTRY CONTINUES TO LIVE IN THE PAST AGE, WHEN THEY STOLE THE SEA FROM THE BOLIVIANS AND ENCLOSED IT TO ITS FATE, THE SAME THING THAT THE UNITED STATES MAKES WITH THE BROTHER COUNTRY OF CUBA. It is criminal to place anti-personnel mines in the territory, whatever it be. It is a pity that the previous Governments of Chile have maintained such a measure and the current one, after all this time just do it. It is a pity Mr. President of Chile. Hopefully nobody gets hurt, regardless of his/her nationality. Mr. Guido Girardi and all Communists and Socialists should be the first to go against Peru or Bolivia or Argentina in the event of armed conflict. These countries “Are not brothers,” they are “Enemies” because they hate us to death, so is “An ERROR” to remove the mines that give us security and also protect us from drug traffickers. At least leave them until after the sentence from The Hague, where stubbornly once more our rulers delivered our sovereignty in a tray, so that other countries can determine whether it is ours or not. This is a completely stupid thing. We only must apply what our heroes wrote “BY REASON OR BY FORCE.” It is a pity that so far mines have not been deactivated, despite the pledges to do it. Undoubtedly is something very expensive and takes a lot of time, but Chile has the moral obligation to comply by removing them. Otherwise denotes a remiss and negligent attitude. Despite the retrograde thoughts of some citizens, all of that was in times of imbecility. Incredible that in the 20th century exists in America a country so sadistic that is surrounding us Argentines, Bolivians and Peruvians with antipersonnel mines, cluster bombs that are forbidden by the Ottawa Convention. What is Chile afraid of? Wasn´t it enough to steal the sea from Bolivia and drown its industry in an unjust war supported by foreign powers? And to be in The Hague Court with Peru? Now they also want the Lauca River that originates in Bolivia. How deep is their aberrant ambition? Aren´t they afraid of making God angry and that He makes them disappear with a tsunami or earthquake because of their unfair treatment to their neighbors? This is great news, but for me however it is also true that good deeds do not involve good intentions. The Chilean Navy always took strategically… so, to take a long time to remove such anti-personnel and anti-tank mines is logical and desirable for this country. What this news just makes for this country is to get before the international community the position of a good intention. Very clear. How easy is to forget the threats from Argentina against Chile during the decade of the problems of Beagle. I will never forget the words of the Argentine Government at the time, that because it was contrary to their interests, declared completely null and void the arbitration award that voluntarily signed, pawning the honour of the nation. What honor are they talking about? Liars and hypocrites. What a disappointment so much ignorance to give a view about what they do not know noting… and worst of all, they judge I think that in these times of peace let´s eliminate these mines. Let´s feel a little bit of fear of our Creator. We are only in transit dear Chileans in this beautiful world. Giving back a piece of strip of sea to Bolivia solves this problem, as children of God. Correction: the Lauca River originates in Chile and arrives to Bolivia. The Silala River originates in Bolivia and comes naturally to Chile. Bye. THE MINES ARE IN CHILEAN TERRITORY AND MET THEIR OBJECTIVE AT THE TIME…OTHERWISE WE WOULD NOT BE SPEAKING FROM CHILE TODAY, THAT´S TRUE… SO THE PROBLEM OF MINES IS CHILE’S AND NO ONE ELSE… AND THE MINES SHOULD BE ELIMINATED AT THE SPEED THAT IS SAFER FOR PROFESSIONALS… AND THAT DRUG SMUGGLERS CONTINUE DYING FOR TRYING TO DESTROY THE YOUTH OF THE WORLD… FORCE CHILE. By what I’ve seen by reading some comments, maybe someday the mines laid in the Chilean borders can be removed, but it is sad to observe that the most dangerous mines that can never be removed, are the ones self sown in the hearts of some Chileans and that always remain dangerously dormant and ready to explode under any pretext. To make a call to reflection would be futile, and we only have to expect that when those mines explode do not harm those who are close to them, whether they are family or friends. Sincere and fraternal greetings to all those Chileans possessors of sanity and good faith.Hugo E. Cáceres. How easy it is to criticize another country! Don´t you remember perhaps that the Argentine army planted anti-personnel mines and anti-tank mines in the plains of the Falklands Islands, during the 1982 war? There are thousands of photos on the Internet, where you see signs that say “Minefield” and English soldiers are taking them out very slowly, because of the danger they pose.If Chile sowed mines in its territory, it did so because an Argentine general, on the balcony of the Casa Rosada, said “today it´s the English and tomorrow the CHILEANS”… or you don´t want to remember?And do not come to me saying that that was said by a coup Government. EACH country is responsible for its foreign policy, regardless that governments are Democratic or DE FACTO, because all documents that leave the Government House and connect with other governments, are legal.And finally, when Peru acquired 400 Russian T-55 tanks, more than 20 Mig-29 fighters and 22 Shukoy fighters and 600,000 AK-47 Kalashnikov rifles, it was to attack Chile, during the Government of Juan Velasco Alvarado, but at the last minute, it seems that Peruvians thought better and aborted the attack, which was scheduled for the day 11.06.1975. Regarding that, it reminds me of “others” that also “backed off” at the last minute, in the Beagle Channel, blaming the weather in the area of Island of the States and they RETURNED and they did not give battle to the SQUADRON of the Navy of CHILE, that also was in the same SECTOR, but by strange COINCIDENCE, it was not affected by the so-called bad weather… Hadn´t it been another thing? The same way that the FLOMAR hid during the FALKLANDS war and did not give battle. Chile is a country too important for Latin America. All of us must take care of it and admire it! And anyone who says otherwise is a hypocrite. It is extremely necessary that Chile remove its mines, they cause so much harm to locals and foreigners; we live in a new era, we should all be united, the entire America against hunger, poverty and all diseases that are still to come. All united to fight society’s curse. It is understood that Chile is still keeping its mines at the border with Peru:1) Because it is afraid to lose the lands that were once Peruvians2) Because it doesn’t have a more human and intelligent way to avoid smuggling3) Because it doesn’t care at all about the lives of the Peruvians who perished during the explosion of such mines4) Because it lost the map with the location of the mines and no one wants to assume responsibility of what might happen in the futureANSWERSA) none of the above (I am Chilean)B) All of the above (I am Peruvian) Chile and Perù hired the services of a Norwegian company expert in mines, who is removing military artifacts on our common border. It is possible that the same procedure take place with Bolivia y Argentina. Gone are the days of nationalist speeches and big talks that triggered the installation of the mines at the borders. Argentina, Casa Rosada, Galtieri: today the Englishmen and tomorrow the Chileans. The crowd screamed ecstaticly: “Tero, Tero, Tero, today the Englishmen and tomorrow the Chileans.” Perù Velasco Alvarado : We will recover the the lost territories. Bolivia: Waiting for the backlash moment. Today things are different : Chile and Argentina, insurmountable relationships, unforeseen military relationships; Argentine ships modifying their missile systems in Talcahuano, Military Force Southern Cross (Cruz del Sur): 17 thousands millions of Chilean investments. Peru: intense commercial interchange with Chilean advice in the economical and social aspects, with investments and social laws. The exception is Bolivia, who blames Chile for all its issues. I am writing from the center of Bolivia, addressing the issue of the sea of Bolivia; I am aware of the Bolivian way of thinking, I always talk to many people from that country about the maritime subject, the Bolivian resident is simple and grateful, like the Chilean, once Chile gets closer, it will be easier to initiate a process of integration; both countries should start building strong friendship bonds, commercial, academic, and cultural agreements, this should be the strategy of the Chilean State and Bolivian State, based on mutual trust and more than respect, the care on each side, the world nowadays doesn’t fix its problems with weapons, it fixes its problems by giving more food to its people and filling the pockets of its residents with money, the use of weapons only creates resentment and insecurity between brothers which in the future can cause insecurity and new conflicts of war without solving anything; for example Bolivia and Chile need each other, in Bolivia there is gas and abundant natural resources, on the other hand Chile has ample coastlines of sea and beach that Bolivia wants, so it’s only matter of being willing and making progress in consolidating the diplomatic relations, thank you. By Dialogo October 01, 2012last_img read more

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first_img 16SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr A common problem countering workplace productivity and the ability to serve customers is inefficient processes. Many of these are inherited and accepted as “just the way we do things.” But in order to work smarter, not harder, and provide a good experience for members, inefficiencies should be challenged in favor of fresh ideas and processes.Across the banking industry a current strategic focus is loan growth – increasing the portfolio by both acquiring new members and expanding services offered to existing customers. Particularly for credit unions, many of which find themselves in a very competitive environment, growing a loan portfolio can be challenging. To win prospective loans, regardless of whether it is a new or existing borrower, an institution has to respond with efficiency in order to get back to the prospective borrower with the same speed as competing financial institutions. With the proper implementation of a workflow management system, a bank or credit union can identify and resolve points of inefficiency that might otherwise impede growth objectives.Inefficiency in the loan portfolio could take the form of:• Duplicate data entry, where staff have to enter the same data into multiple systems continue reading »last_img read more

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first_imgTunisian referee Youssef Essrayri will referee Ghana’s 2019 Africa Cup of Nations opener against Benin on Tuesday.Essrayri officiated a Ghana match during the 2018 World Cup qualifiers, the 1-1 draw against Congo in Kumasi. The result effectively ended Ghana’s chances of qualifying for Russia. He will act as the center referee for the game and he will be assisted by his compatriot Yamen Malloulchi who will be the Assistant Referee One.Egyptian Ahmed Hossameldin Taha Ibrahim will be Assistant Two and his countryman Amin Mohamed Omar has been named as the fourth official.Manuel Irenio Lopes Nascimento from Guinea Bissau as the Match Commissioner. General Coordinator for the match is Titus Haimbili Kunamuene from Namibia.The match is scheduled to kick off at 8 pm at the Ismailia Stadium after African Champions Cameroon play Guinea Bissau earlier on Tuesday.last_img read more

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first_imgGerman football wunderkind Youssoufa MoukokoBerlin, Germany | AFP | A German football wunderkind, who only turned 14 on Tuesday, says his goal is to one day lift the Champions League trophy with Borussia Dortmund and win the Ballon d’Or.Burly teenager Youssoufa Moukoko, a goal machine in German youth football, is already well on his way to a professional contract with Dortmund, the current Bundesliga leaders.He has scored 22 goals in 12 games for their Under-17s this season — including hat-tricks on four occasions — and hit four goals, as well as contributing two assists, in a 10-0 romp against Hennef last month.“If I am honest, my aim is to be a professional footballer with Dortmund, lift the Champions League with Borussia and win the Ballon d’Or,” Moukoko told German magazine Sport Bild in his first interview.His breakthrough last season was staggering.As a 13-year-old, he netted 40 goals in 28 games to help Dortmund’s juniors win the Under-17 league title, scored the winning goal in June’s 3-2 cup final win over Bayern Munich. He also became a Germany Under-16 international.However, it is at least three years before Moukoko can make his Bundesliga debut as the minimum age is 17, and then only with special exemption.Even though he is much younger than most of his team-mates, defences struggle to cope with the robust Cameroon-born teenager. However, doubts about his true age persist.According to his official certificate, issued at the German consulate in Yaounde, his date of birth is November 20, 2004, but he admits the constant speculation over its authenticity annoys him.“Last season was hard for me, with that whole story. I can’t do anything about the fact things have gone so well,” said Moukoko.Nevertheless, the German wunderkind has tried to play down expectations on his young shoulders.“I have plenty of time to develop. The next thing I want to do is play for the (Dortmund) Under-19 team,” he said.“We’ll see after that, not everything has to go so fast.”Share on: WhatsApplast_img read more

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