July 29, 2021
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first_imgA study by the 10 November Institute of Technology (ITS) in Surabaya shows that Indonesia’s sea transportation sector has recorded Rp 12.2 trillion (US$821.9 million) in output losses in the first half of the year, due primarily to the drop in passenger demand as a result of government restrictions imposed to contain COVID-19 transmission.The ITS study evaluated the impacts on the sector from the Transportation Ministry’s ban on mudik (exodus) from April 24 to June 1 during the Idul Fitri holiday season. The ministry imposed the travel ban as part of the government’s coronavirus response in an attempt to halt the disease’s spread.Among the losses to the sector that the study attributed to the mudik ban are an estimated loss of Rp 862 billion for state-owned shipping company PT Pelni and combined losses of Rp 44 billion for inter-island ferry companies. These include ferries operating the Merak-Bakauheni route between the provinces of Banten and Lampung, as well as those operating the Ketapang-Gilimanuk route between East Java and Bali. “We’ve seen a huge decline in passengers during the pandemic, especially at three main ferry ports and routes. On the Merak-Bakauheni route, the number of passengers dropped around 80 to 95 percent,” ITS rector Mochamad Ashari said on Tuesday, during a webinar held by the ministry.The decline in economic activities in the transportation industry had contributed to the 5.32 percent year-on-year (yoy) contraction in gross domestic product (GDP), according to Statistics Indonesia (BPS).BPS data for the second quarter also show that the transportation and warehousing sector contracted 30.84 percent yoy, with the sea transportation sector suffering a 17.48 percent yoy decline.During the webinar, ITS researcher Ardi Adji said that the contraction in the sea transportation sector in turn caused a ripple effect in local economies, with the provincial economy of Bali suffering the worst blow. “Bali is highly dependent on its tourism sector and tourist flows by sea transport. Therefore, the decline in the sector caused the island [province] Rp 824 billion losses in the regional GDP, making it the worst-affected province,” Ardi said.He suggested that the government provide fiscal incentives for shipping lines to cushion the economic impacts of the COVID-19 health crisis.“The government could roll out several alternative incentives for sea transportation operators, such as interest subsidies and payment deferrals,” he said.Read also: Port operator Pelindo III records decline in ship trafficCarmelita Hartoto, who chairs the Indonesian National Shipowners Association (INSA), expanded on Ardi ’s statement, saying that the government had still not responded to the association’s request for non-tax revenue (PNBP) waivers.“We have to cushion the severe income decline caused by the pandemic. It’s hard to sustain our operations if the economy continues to worsen, and this could [in turn] lead to a wave of layoffs,” she said.State-Owned Enterprises Minister Erick Thohir, who also chairs the COVID-19 Handling and National Economic Recovery Committee, made assurances during the webinar that the government would maintain steady distribution of its stimulus funds until next year to boost the economy.The government has allocated Rp 695.2 trillion to stimulate the economy, focusing on healthcare, social protection and economic recovery programs. Six months into the crisis, however, it had disbursed only 34.1 percent of the funds, or around Rp 237 trillion.Topics :last_img read more

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first_img Dodgers hit seven home runs, sweep Colorado Rockies Newsroom GuidelinesNews TipsContact UsReport an Error Cody Bellinger homer gives Dodgers their first walkoff win of season How Dodgers pitcher Ross Stripling topped the baseball podcast empire Dodgers’ Max Muncy trying to work his way out of slow start An important question also persists: why keep going?“I want to finish what we started here,” Honeycutt said. “I love what I do, so it’s just a bump in the road, is the way I look at it. It probably would have been easier to take a few months away from it, but I didn’t really know. (Dr. Watkins) said in six weeks it’ll be better than it was the previous six weeks. It kind of goes in phases a little bit.”Honeycutt has a contract for next season, which would be his 15th in his current role. Among active pitching coaches, only the Padres’ Darren Balsley and the White Sox’s Don Cooper have held the job longer. Honeycutt’s contract does not require he serve as the Dodgers’ everyday pitching coach, however. The opportunity to transition into a less hands-on role is there if he wants it.Related Articlescenter_img In February, Honeycutt had surgery in Marina del Rey to fuse two vertebrae in his lower back – the L5 and S1, the two segments that comprise the lumbosacral joint. Anyone who has experienced symptoms of sciatica is at least physically familiar with their lumbosacral joint. Within two weeks, Honeycutt was back at work at the Dodgers’ Camelback Ranch facility in Arizona.The work itself seems easy enough. Honeycutt now has a standing desk in his office adjoining the Dodger Stadium clubhouse. Watching pitchers pitch, pregame strategizing, walking to the mound from the dugout – Honeycutt can do all the things a pitching coach would list on his resumé.The travel is more difficult. The nadir was a late-April series at Wrigley Field in Chicago, with its low ceilings, sparse elevators, and meandering inner pathways laden with stairs. On team flights, Honeycutt must remind himself to get his legs moving every 15 or 20 minutes. The longest season in professional sports waits for no one.“He’s a pretty tough man,” pitcher Kenley Jansen said of Honeycutt. “That can take a beat out of you, especially the long plane rides that we take. I can see that he can’t sit most of the time, but he’s working hard recovering, getting on his feet, get that little jog out there.”The father-son surgical team of Dr. Robert Watkins III and Dr. Robert Watkins IV check in once a homestand to monitor their handiwork. About a month ago, Honeycutt said he underwent an MRI exam. The scan revealed bone growth in his lumbosacral joint, a positive sign. As his nerves recover from the procedure, Honeycutt said the dull aches in his legs have a chance to improve. He’ll continue to take prescription anti-inflammatory medications in the meantime. Fire danger is on Dave Roberts’ mind as Dodgers head to San Francisco “The last few years that I’ve been doing this, I almost take it a year at a time and try to throw my energy and effort into what I do, and try to do it the best I can, and hopefully help our guys the best I can,” Honeycutt said. “I don’t really worry about the future that much. I just worry about the present and all those things will be assessed after the season.”ALSODodgers shortstop Corey Seager was named National League Player of the Week on Monday. In five games last week, Seager went 10 for 20 with five runs scored, two doubles, a triple, two home runs and seven RBIs.UP NEXTDodgers (LHP Rich Hill, 4-1, 2.68 ERA) at Padres (RHP Ronald Bolaños, 0-1, 5.79 ERA), Tuesday, 7 p.m., SportsNet LA (where available), 570 AM LOS ANGELES — The staircase leading from the third base dugout to the Dodgers’ clubhouse is, for some, a getaway. It’s a runway for athletes to bounce energetically onto a baseball field. It’s also a place for emotionally defeated men to hide their emotional defeat.For Rick Honeycutt, the staircase is an obstacle.The Dodgers’ 65-year-old pitching coach trudged up the steps Friday afternoon for a pregame interview. For 10 minutes Honeycutt stood, as he usually does at work, answering questions about the rods and screws and fake disk holding his back together.“I can sit if something’s the right height,” Honeycutt said. “The lower I sit … it’s just easier to stand.”last_img read more

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