April 9, 2021
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  • 7:36 am The Claypool Lennon Delirium Transcends Universes At The Capitol Theatre
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first_imgCrowds filled La Fortune Student Center on Wednesday night, drawn by the International Taste of South Bend, part of Notre Dame’s celebration of International Education Week. The International Taste of ND has been the signature event of International Education Week on Notre Dame’s campus for the past four years. Student volunteer, Sarah Jung, said the event serves to showcase different cuisines from South Bend, which can be hard for students to come by. “It shows how diverse South Bend food actually is,” she said. McKenna Pencak, main coordinator of the event and a representative for International Student Services and Activities, said the event offers an opportunity to appreciate students’ various backgrounds and cultures, especially with such a prominent international community at Notre Dame. “There are more than 1,000 international students at Notre Dame … The International Taste of South Bend helps celebrate and promote international education and exchange,” Pencak said Restaurant owners were eager to showcase their cuisine and their culture with both students and South Bend locals. Luc, owner of the Salvadoran restaurant Girasol known for its signature papusas, has participated in the International Taste of South Bend since its debut four years ago. “It’s a good opportunity to attract customers,” Luc said. Kenny Weiss, chef and family owner of Weiss’ Gasthaus, was a newcomer to event. Weiss’ Gasthaus is a new traditional German restaurant in South Bend located close to campus. “The timing, the building, everything just came together, so we decided we might as well take the chance,” he said. In view of the educational aspect of the event, Kenny commented on the role cuisine plays in building a global community.  “More people make peace over breaking bread than anything else,” he said. Although the International Taste of South Bend is a venue in which restaurants can showcase their food in order to attract customers, restaurant owners emphasized their appreciation of the Notre Dame student body. The owner of King Gyro’s was particularly expressive of his regard for ND students. “We have five sites now, but we started right next to ND, and we just fell in love with the students,” he said. Student volunteer, Ivy Yen, said she thought the event gave students an important opportunity to promote intercultural understanding. “I think it brings everyone together because food makes you feel so good!” she said. Contact Catriona Shaughnessy at [email protected]last_img read more

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first_imgTags: Cancer research, Notre Dame the bald and the beautiful, TBAB, the bald and the beautiful Junior Kat Stultz said she first heard about The Bald and The Beautiful her freshman year, when some friends donated their hair to raise money for cancer research and treatment. That was when Stultz, whose friends and family have experienced various forms of cancer, began to think about participating.Kelly Konya | The Observer [Observer File Photo]“My best friend Patrick lost his friend Neil at age 19 to leukemia, and ever since then I’ve wanted to do something in his honor and to help combat pediatric cancer,” she said. “On the older end of cancer, a very dear friend and theology professor, Mr. Scurro back home, had pancreatic cancer last year and thankfully won that fight.“My mom also lost three of her good friends within the past three years to various forms of cancer, so I want to be in solidarity with all of them and show my support in the various fights, even if they didn’t necessarily win it.”Stultz passed on participating the next year because her hair had not yet grown to the eight inches required for donation. On Thursday, however, Stultz will become one of hundreds of participants in The Bald and The Beautiful when she shaves her head and donates the hair.The event, which takes place today, tomorrow and Friday in the Sorin and Dooley Rooms of the LaFortune Student Center, raises money for the St. Baldricks Foundation, which funds cancer research, and the pediatric ward of Memorial Hospital of South Bend, according to its website. Hair donations go to Pantene Beautiful Lengths, which makes wigs for cancer patients.Freshman Erich Jegier, who also participated in the Gentleman Auction on March 26, benefitting benefitted a foundation that funds childhood cancer research, said he decided to shave his head because it was a visible way of raising awareness about cancer.“I like the fact that it raises awareness,” Jegier said. “I’m the kind of person who can take a risk and put myself out on the line and do something that’s a little bit crazy, just so that people notice it.“I feel like awareness is something that’s overlooked as far as service goes. You can be focused on raising money, but the service is futile if nobody knows where that money is going to, and awareness can be just a huge aspect because long-term it provides lots of benefits.”Many students participate through a club or dorm, or hear about the event through their friends. Freshman Daniel Pedroza said he heard about The Bald and The Beautiful through a member of the Notre Dame Glee Club, who was encouraging fellow members to sign up.“All these questions started popping up, like what would my parents think or what would it look like … I found myself debating with myself about whether or not it would be a good idea,” he said. “It was yesterday when I decided that I found it silly that I was doing that debate, the fact that I was going to make a choice about it, because I started thinking about the people who don’t get a choice. They don’t get to choose. They don’t get any say in the matter.”According to its website, the event, now in its fifth year, raised more than $40,000 in 2013 and donated more than 400 inches of hair. Stultz said in addition to the $10 registration fee, she is hoping to raise $500, soliciting donations from family and friends and through social media.Jegier, who is getting his head shaved Friday night, said he hopes to raise more than $250 from his friends and family.“Since it is on a Friday evening, I’m hoping to get a big turnout with my friends and instigate a lot of donations then,” he said.Stultz said though she will miss things like French-braiding her hair, she is excited to be raising awareness about the struggles of having cancer.“Something that I’ve been learning through the various experiences with cancer in my life is how special and precious the gift of life is, and how everything that we have can be taken away at any moment,” Stultz said. “So the small sacrifice of giving up my hair for all of these people who are going through much bigger battles than I am is just to be able to be in solidarity with them is what I’m hoping to get out of it.”last_img read more

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An incident of dating violence was reported to a University administrator Tuesday, according to the Notre Dame Security Police (NDSP) crime log.The alleged crime occurred last Friday in a men’s residence hall, according to the log entry. The complaint will go through the Title IX review process.According to du Lac, the University’s code of conduct, dating violence is defined as “physical violence or the threat of physical violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with an individual.”The existence of a relationship is determined on “factors such as the length and type of relationship and frequency of interaction between the persons involved,” du Lac states.Tags: dating violence, du lac, NDSP crime log, Title IX

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first_imgThe Saint Mary’s Science Hall, which was under construction during the 2015-2016 academic year, is ready for use, and construction on the new Angela Athletic and Wellness Complex will begin later this fall.The Science Hall is almost complete despite slipping a few weeks past the intended July completion date, professor of biology Thomas Fogle said.“We are right at the very end, and we’ve been talking to construction people and they are beginning to move out,” Fogle said. “They’re just finishing the last little details, and we are going to be moving equipment in over the next few weeks as space becomes available.”Austin Stahly, manager of energy and facilities projects, said the construction hold-up was in part due to a nearby tunnel being unable to support the originally planned construction load. Now that is settled, concrete trucks will pull in and complete the sidewalk, stairs and handicap entrance very soon, he said.Fogle said the physics lab and lecture rooms, on the basement level, have been completed and in use since last December. The biology and chemistry rooms will be ready for use soon, as well.“I would expect over the next few months we’ll be fully integrated into there, using these spaces certainly within the next few weeks,” Fogle said.Ben Bowman, director of facilities, said the actual building is ready for occupancy, though small details still need to be completed.“We pulled all of [the construction workers] from the exterior to concentrate on finishing the interior, and now that we’re able to occupy the interior, we have people working on the exterior,” Bowman said. “The inside can be fully occupied at this point, and now professors are trying to get their equipment organized and moved into the labs before they start holding classes in there.”Fogle hopes students take full advantage of the new spaces for studying, exchanging data and relaxing. Two of the smaller labs will be used for research requiring very clean conditions, such as microbiology and cell cultures, while the larger lab space is more multi-purposeful.There will be a building dedication Oct. 14 for donors, students and faculty to see the new space, Fogle said.Though construction on Angela Athletic and Wellness Complex is due to begin this fall, the athletic fields have been completed and are currently in use by the soccer team for evening practices and a scrimmage, Bowman said.Bowman said the addition will include a field house with suspended track on the east side, a health services suite on the south side, an athletic suite on north side is the athletic suite, a multi-purpose room on the west side, and cardio and strength will be located centrally.Julie Schroeder-Biek, director of athletics, said in an email that the facility will be very functional for the College’s athletic department by providing needed locker room space, room for intramural and club sports and more.“This will be a building that our entire campus will benefit from,” she said in an email. “Besides athletic, fitness and strength options, there are a lot of planned community spaces built into the building as well. We have spacious lounges and a cafe.  Women’s Health and [the Belles Against Violence Office] will join us in the facility, so that it truly will be an athletic and wellness facility.”Stahly said the usual occupants of Angela are currently spread out in four places with most of the staff located in Dalloway’s Clubhouse, some staff members in McCandless Hall, strength and cardio equipment in the basement of Regina North and training staff still located in Angela.Volleyball and basketball will still use the performance court in Angela for competitions this season, Stahly said.“We’re fortunate to have space on campus to move all the activities, people and equipment,” Bowman said.Construction crews will move in after Labor Day, and the plan is to be done sometime early in 2018, Biek said.A final noticeable campus construction activity is located on the west side of Le Mans Hall, where a tunnel top cracked and began to settle over the summer, Bowman said,“They had to pull that tunnel top off this summer and … pour a partial lid on top of it,” he said. “That tunnel gets a lot of traffic from people trying to get around to the north side of Moreau, with deliveries, lifts for roof repairs, etc. So that and age could have been part of the issue there.”Bowman said other tunnels on property are not to the point of failure, but have been addressed. Recently repaired tunnels include the tunnel on the west side of the library, and big concrete structures have been placed on top of the tunnel between McCandless and Angela to prevent the added weight of parked cars and heavy bus traffic.Tags: angela athletic and wellness complex, Construction, saint mary’s, science halllast_img read more

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first_imgArmy, Navy and Air Force Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) cadets kept vigil for 24 hours at the Clarke Memorial Fountain, starting Monday and ending Tuesday afternoon. Cadets had 30-minute shifts, and at the conclusion of the 24 hours, a celebration was held in honor of Veterans Day.Freshman Parker McDowell’s shift began at 4:30 a.m. Despite the chilly morning, with wind blowing water from the fountain onto the cadets, McDowell said he enjoyed the demonstration.“It was actually pretty enjoyable,” McDowell said. “It was a good chance to reflect on why we were there in the first place, honoring those who have lost their lives in wars.” ANNIE SMIERCIAK | The Observer Notre Dame Reserve Officers’ Training Corps kept vigil for 24 hours prior to their ceremony honoring Veterans Day, starting Monday and ending Tuesday afternoon.The Clarke Memorial Fountain, known around campus as Stonehenge, was dedicated in 1986 to Notre Dame alumni who gave their lives in service to this country. The fountain specifically honors the 500 alumni who died in World War II, Korea and Vietnam. “Pro Patria et Pace,” meaning “For Country and Peace,” is inscribed in the base of the fountain.Around campus, the fountain is better known for the tradition of students running through the water after winning a home football game. Drawing attention to the true meaning behind the fountain is part of why cadets stand vigil for 24 hours.“We walk by Stonehenge every day just going to class, but no one really thinks about it because it just passes over our eyes, but having people stationed there and standing watch on each side of the fountain for 24 hours straight, through the middle of the night, it really forces people to think about why [the fountain] is there,” McDowell said.At the conclusion of the 24 hours on Tuesday at 5:00 p.m., all ROTC faculty, staff, cadets and midshipmen gathered at the fountain for a tri-military celebration of Veterans Day. The celebration began with the introduction of the official party and a benediction by Fr. Peter Rocca.Lieutenant colonel Christopher Pratt, commanding officer of the Notre Dame Army ROTC and professor of military science, took the podium to introduce the guest speaker for the celebration: Honorable Judge Michael G. Gotsch. Gotsch is currently the magistrate judge in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Indiana.Prior to becoming a judge, Gotsch was commissioned at Notre Dame as a part of Army ROTC in 1979. He was a military intelligence officer, and he rose to the rank of captain. While on active duty, he was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal, the Army Commendation Medal and the Army Achievement Medal. After leaving active duty, he returned to Notre Dame and graduated with a law degree in 1987.Gotsch began his speech by praising the Notre Dame ROTC and remembering his time as a cadet.“I remember morning runs around the lake, and afternoon drills in the Stepan Center,” Gotsch said.Gotsch then reminded the audience of the conditions that veterans have faced in wars, listing the intense physical challenges from weather and other factors.“Many of these veterans didn’t ask to leave their homes to fight on distant battlefields. They didn’t go because they loved combat or glory,” Gotsch said. “Rather, they went because their country asked them to … They were ordinary people who responded to extraordinary challenge with exceptional courage.”He then welcomed the cadets into a long line of Notre Dame alumni who have courageously served this country.“The original Fighting Irish — an unbroken tradition of service [that] each of you is now a part of,” said Gotsch.Gotsch left the cadets with a final piece of advice.“The motto of the U.S. Army veritas, ‘veritas vigilantia victoria’ which means truth, vigilance and victory,” Gotsch said. “If you keep those concepts in mind and apply the values you’ve learned here — God, Country and Notre Dame— you will be excellent military officers, and you will continue to be a credit to yourselves, your families and your alma mater.”The celebration was concluded by the playing of Taps and a benediction by Rocca, who left the audience with a reminder of the importance of true and lasting peace.Tags: Clarke Memorial Fountain, ROTC, Veterans Day, vigillast_img read more

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first_imgAdriana Perez | The Observer At the end of the steps of Main Building, by the entrance to the second floor, fabric covers a mural of Queen Isabella I of Spain. The tapestry depicts local flora and fauna, as well as imagery important for both Indigenous and Christian traditions.When the initial decision to cover the murals was made in Jan. 2019, many denounced it publicly. Yet other individuals and groups supported it, like the student senate, Student Government, College Democrats, BridgeND’s vice president and the Observer Editorial Board.But some — who appreciated the decision — also expressed that acknowledging Native heritage while aiming toward a more diverse and inclusive Notre Dame required an approach more nuanced than just covering the murals.“A curtain can be easy and cheap, both intellectually and financially. What a university with real vision, with real character, must do is face the challenge head on, to its core,” Christian Moevs, associate professor of Italian studies, wrote in a Letter to the Editor published Feb. 19, 2019.Where do we go from here?A similar sentiment to that expressed by Moevs remains even today, as students, faculty and staff reflect on the recent covering of the Columbus Murals and where the University can go from here.“We did a lot of heavy lifting, and to finally see something come of that — it was good,” senior Marcus Winchester-Jones, treasurer of the Native American Student Association at Notre Dame (NASAND), said of the murals being covered. Winchester-Jones is a member of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi.Notre Dame is “heading in the right direction with that move,” he said. “But there’s still a lot of work to be done, for sure.”In their report, the Columbus Murals Committee had offered two additional recommendations “concerning further actions the University might take to foster continuing conversation, teaching and research about the murals and their various contexts,” per the cover letter.The first additional recommendation was to announce a University-wide observance of Founder’s Day “on the feast day of St. Edward the Confessor (October 13), thus occurring close to but not coinciding with Columbus Day,” according to the committee’s report.A celebration of Founder’s Day would display the murals and invite dialogue about them in connection with a scholarly symposium or teach-in exploring Notre Dame’s early history.The committee also recommended that Native American communities integral to the University’s founding — such as the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi — be concretely and tangibly recognized, with a monumental sculpture, a prominent land acknowledgment or the establishment of more scholarships for Native American students.NASAND has asked the University to officially recognize the second Monday of October as Indigenous Peoples’ Day — a day in which the United States has traditionally observed the anniversary of Columbus’ arrival to the Americas, with Columbus Day.“We’re not asking much,” Winchester-Jones said. He added that the change would be an indication to NASAND that “even though we’re small, we’re mighty. And we can get things done, even though the Native population and those interested in the culture aren’t always large in numbers.”The University has not officially acknowledged Indigenous Peoples’ Day, but it also does not recognize Columbus Day, “given that it is a day of classes and work for our campus community,” Firth said. Students, faculty and staff are expected to continue with their normal daily activities as if it were a normal day, not a federal holiday.As of 2019, “at least ten states now celebrate some version of Indigenous Peoples’ Day… Many college campuses have dumped Columbus Day for Indigenous Peoples’ Day as have more than 100 cities, towns and counties across the country,” according to NPR. Some of the colleges that have done so include Syracuse, Johns Hopkins and Columbia University.“In the future, if I had to imagine Indigenous Peoples’ Day [at Notre Dame], I think it’d be cool to have a powwow on that day,” Winchester-Jones said. A powwow is a traditional celebration of Native American culture with a social gathering for dancing and singing.Winchester-Jones also mentioned other ways in which Notre Dame could honor Indigenous Peoples’ Day, such as an email blast acknowledging the celebration or a special dinner at the dining halls.Marisel Moreno, associate professor of Romance languages and literatures and member of the Columbus Murals Committee, told The Observer in an email that “celebrating Indigenous Peoples’ Day… is about lifting the veil of invisibility that erases them from the present national narrative, relegating them to a distant past.”“In the midst of the social reckoning in which we find ourselves, the fight against racism — in all its forms — must confront our sanitized views of the past,” she added.Referring to the committees’ additional recommendations, Moreno said celebrating Native American heritage on a particular day would include “close collaboration with Pokagon and Potawatomi communities to plan public celebrations as well as talks and panels centering them.”While the pandemic has put some of these plans on hold, she said, “Notre Dame is committed to recognize and celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day.”Recognition of Native heritage and the University’s presence on Native land need not be confined to a single day, either. There are other tangible and symbolic ways of celebrating the contributions of Native Americans to the University, similar to those recommended by the Columbus Murals Committee.“Some universities provide free tuition to tribal peoples [whose] lands they inhabit,” Collier, NAI’s director, told The Observer. These universities including Miami University of Ohio and Florida State University.Collier also talked about the possibility of carrying out land acknowledgements at University-sponsored events such as football games.“Welcome to Notre Dame Stadium. You are in the traditional homeland of the Pokagon Potawatomi people and the home of the Fighting Irish,” he said, changing his voice to briefly adopt the role of broadcaster.About the stadium, Winchester-Jones said he thinks “it’d be cool if they had a Pokagon flag up there.”These acknowledgements would bring more business to the Pokagon Band’s Four Winds casino, Collier added, “because all of that money that they get from the casino pays for healthcare, food and housing for Pokagon people.”“We may be on the nicest piece of land in the entire Midwest,” Collier said. “So, there should be somebody that we’re thanking for that.”Tags: Christopher Columbus Day, Christopher Columbus murals, Main Building Inside the Main Building, native flora and fauna — vines, rabbits, mice, flowers, turtles and trees — decorate fabric that resembles thick, colorful tapestries. While these coverings are new, the paintings that lie underneath are almost as old as the University itself.The controversy over the Columbus Murals, painted by Luigi Gregori in the early 1880s and located by the undergraduate admissions office in Notre Dame’s Main Building, is not recent either. For years before their covering, calls to either conceal them or leave them uncovered have resonated throughout the University community.Looking backDuring her time at the University, alumna and journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones (‘98) protested the murals alongside other students of color. She then wrote a response to a Letter to the Editor that had denounced the protests.The author of the Letter to the Editor had written that “it is Columbus, and the followers of Columbus who, for all their misdeeds along the way, set up the institutions which both bring the Indians back to the natural law and introduce them to the way of salvation… God bless Columbus and his murals!”“Yes, it was Columbus that set the platforms for these racist American institutions. A devil calling someone a savage is like the pot calling the kettle black,” Hannah-Jones responded, back in 1995.In 2003, an Observer columnist wrote that the murals “celebrated genocide under the Dome.” And in the few years leading up to the historic decision to cover them, the community once again engaged in similar conversation. In 2014, The Observer’s editorial board wrote about the need to acknowledge the history between Notre Dame and Native Americans.After the Native American Student Association of Notre Dame (NASAND) protested the Columbus murals in Oct. 2017, the topic resurfaced in the campus community, spurring a series of Letters to the Editor and events that culminated in a petition signed by over 300 professors and students, calling for the removal of the murals. Activist group Rising Tide Michiana then unfurled a protest banner in Hesburgh Library.Where are we now?Then, on Jan. 2019, University President Fr. John Jenkins announced the murals would be covered — a decision that drew both support and criticism from within and outside the University. Delays in the murals’ covering also caused confusion: It was more than a year after this first announcement that the paintings were finally covered in Sept. 2020.The initial decision had been followed by the selection of a committee on Feb. 14, 2019 that would advise Fr. Jenkins on how to go about fulfilling his proposal.“The committee recommended that the installation of the mural coverings coincide with the installation of a new permanent exhibition regarding the University’s early history,” Ann Firth, vice chair of the Columbus Murals Committee and chief of staff to Fr. Jenkins, said in an email to The Observer.The initial recommendation and plan was that the permanent exhibition would be installed next to the original murals — which would already be covered — on the second floor of the Main Building, once the office of undergraduate admissions moved to McKenna Hall by 2022, according to the report. However, the COVID-19 pandemic has slowed down this process for at least a year, and perhaps for longer, Firth said.“That reality, coupled with the urgency of the national and campus dialogues on issues of racial justice as Fr. Jenkins referenced in his August 24 letter to the campus community contributed to the decision to install the coverings now, rather than at a date at least 2 years in the future,” Firth said.Because of this delay, the installation of a temporary exhibit with context regarding the murals and the coverings was also planned for Dec. 2020, Firth said.The coverings are removable so that faculty may request access to the murals for their classes and so that they can be displayed occasionally, according to the Aug. 24 letter. Besides displaying local biodiversity, the design on the coverings’ fabric is meant to “fuse the European aesthetic with that of indigenous peoples,” Firth said. Brian Collier, interim director of Native American Initiatives (NAI) and director of the American Indian Catholic Schools Network (AICSN), pointed out that the turtle is a central part of creation stories for Native Americans, as is the tree of life in Christianity. Both symbols can be seen on many of the coverings.last_img read more

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first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) MGN ImageCLYMER – A Pennsylvania man died from injuries sustained during a crash this week on Clymer Center Road in Clymer.The Chautauqua County Sheriff’s Office says Michael Wade, 52, of Clymer, allegedly failed to keep right and struck another vehicle in the oncoming lane on Thursday, February 13.Deputies say the driver of the other vehicle, David Bensink, 69, of Wattsburg, Pa., was not wearing a seatbelt at the time of the crash.Both were transported to UPMC Hamot for their injuries. On Thursday, deputies say Bensink died at UPMC Hamot from the injuries he sustained from the crash.Deputies say Wade is charged with failure to keep right. No additional charges are expected in the case.last_img read more

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first_imgPhoto: LBJ LibraryWASHINGTON – A new poll shows President Trump is losing ground to presumptive Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden.It comes amid a chaotic week, as protesters gather daily near the White House and the Coronavirus pandemic rages on.The CNN poll conducted by SSRS finds President Trump’s approval rating down seven points in the last month.That puts him even further behind former Vice President Biden, whose support now stands at its highest level in polling. Among registered voters, Trump is now 14 points behind Biden in the race for the White House, with 41 percent backing Trump and 55 percent backing Biden.38 percent approve of the way Trump is handling his job, while 57 percent disapprove.That’s the President’s worst approval rating since January 2019.The survey also finds a growing majority of Americans feel racism is a big problem and that the criminal justice system favors whites over blacks. Share:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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first_img Kelli O’Hara View Comments Star Files The Bridges of Madison County, starring four-time Tony nominee Kelli O’Hara and Steven Pasquale and directed by Tony winner Bartlett Sher, tells the story of housewife Francesca Johnson and photographer Robert Kincaid, their chance encounter and the unlikely four-day love affair that leaves them caught between decision and desire. Additional cast members include Hunter Foster, Cass Morgan, Michael X. Martin, Derek Klena and Caitlin Kinnunen. The cast album for Jason Robert Brown’s The Bridges of Madison County is just “One Second and A Million Miles” away, give or take a couple of weeks. The previously announced cast recording will be released by Ghostlight records digitally on April 15, with the CD in stores on May 20. Broadway.com made a visit to the recording studio on March 3 as the cast preserved the romantic score. Fans can pre-order the album on the Sh-K-Boom website. The Bridges of Madison County Show Closed This production ended its run on May 18, 2014 Derek Klena Before fans take a listen to tracks such as “Falling Into You,” “Another Life” and “It All Fades Away” in their own homes, they can catch The Bridges of Madison County at Broadway’s Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre. The musical celebrated its official opening on February 20. Related Shows Steven Pasqualelast_img read more

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first_imgLondon theater is busier than ever with a major reopening of a West End playhouse jostling for attention with eagerly awaited revivals (from the likes of Shakespeare, Sean O’Casey, and Andrew Lloyd Webber, to name but a few). Also on tap: transfers of several acclaimed new plays and a musical drawn from the iconic songbook of Ray Davies and the Kinks. Read on to find out more. APRIL 14-20 Oh, Coward!: Fresh on the heels of the sellout revival of Noel Coward’s Blithe Spirit, starring Dame Angela Lansbury and Janie Dee, along comes the master’s lesser-known 1951 comedy, Relative Values, opening April 14 at the Harold Pinter Theatre and directed by Trevor Nunn. Patricia Hodge, Rory Bremner, and recent Olivier Award winner Leigh Zimmerman co-star. ALSO: The off-West End revival of Andrew Lloyd Webber and Ben Elton’s 2000 musical The Beautiful Game opens on April 8. Niamh Perry—an alum of Love Never Dies in London—stars. Who will emerge victorious at the Olivier Awards: Once or The Book of Mormon, Jude Law’s Henry V or Tom Hiddleston’s Coriolanus (or someone else)? Find out April 13 at a star-studded ceremony at the Royal Opera House, featuring a guest appearance from Broadway great Bernadette Peters. APRIL 21-27 Keeping Secrets: Playwright James Graham, who is part of the Broadway-aimed Finding Neverland, opens topical-sounding new play, Privacy, directed by Josie Rourke on April 22 at the Donmar. The piece stars Olivier winner Michelle Terry (Tribes) and Paul Chahidi, fondly remembered from his scene-stealing turn as Maria in the recent all-male Twelfth Night. ALSO: It’s the first full week of performances at Shakespeare’s Globe for director Lucy Bailey’s take on Titus Andronicus, one of the Bard’s bloodiest works. William Houston has the title role. View Commentscenter_img APRIL 28-MAY 4 Rock On: Expect the Hampstead Theatre to keep the beat, and then some, as the May 1 opening gets nearer for Sunny Afternoon, director Edward Hall’s new musical drawn from the back catalog of U.K. rock gods Ray Davies and the Kinks. Joe Penhall (Blue/Orange) has written the book based on an original story from Davies, and Dominic Tighe, Helen Hobson, and George Maguire head the cast. APRIL 7-13 Back to Before: The Apollo Theatre made headlines on December 19 when portions of its ceiling fell in during a performance of The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time. Now, the Shaftesbury Avenue playhouse is reopening, its rooftop balcony level secured and sealed off, with the commercial transfer of Tony winner John Tiffany’s acclaimed production of the Jack Thorne play Let the Right One In, seen late last year at the Royal Court. ALSO: The West End transfer of David Lindsay-Abaire’s Good People, starring Imelda Staunton, opens on April 15. ALSO: Last chance to see Broadway’s brilliant original Frankie Valli, John Lloyd Young, heading the London company of Jersey Boys before he departs April 27 to promote the forthcoming Clint Eastwood film of the stage show, in which he stars. Veteran director Howard Davies opens a National Theatre revival of Sean O’Casey’s war-themed 1929 play on April 22 with Ronan Raftery in the central role.last_img read more

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