April 9, 2021
  • 7:39 am Watch Members of Lettuce Join Vulfpeck For Late Night Jazz Fest Throwdown
  • 7:39 am The Disco Biscuits Share Full Videos Of Powerful Hometown Run At The Fillmore
  • 7:36 am The Claypool Lennon Delirium Transcends Universes At The Capitol Theatre
  • 7:35 am Phish Shows Off ‘California Love’ In Their Tour Closing Performance [Recap]
  • 7:31 am Hometeam New Years Rally To Enter 2017 With Music, Art, & Community In Florida

first_imgJohn Mayer returned to the stage last night, hitting The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon in support of his recently released single, “Love On The Weekend.” Though Mayer had been featured on the show with Dead & Company earlier this year, the guitarist had yet to perform on the program as a solo artist. Fans have been excited about Mayer’s forthcoming album The Search For Everything, especially as he has promised solo tour dates both before and after the Dead & Company summer 2017 engagement.One looming question was, who would Mayer be performing with on this tour? The performance on Fallon gives a strong indication that Mayer will indeed be accompany by John Mayer Trio musicians, drummer Steve Jordan and bassist Pino Palladino. Mayer was also accompanied by James Valentine on acoustic guitar, as well as a pair of backup vocalists providing accompaniment to the new hit song.Thanks to Fallon, we can watch “Love On The Weekend” in full force, streaming below.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgA zine from Radcliffe’s exhibit “Altered Gazes.”What a tripThe Ludlow-Santo Domingo Library contains the world’s largest private trove of popular and underground cultural ephemera related to sex and drugs. Highlights of the 50,000-item collection will be displayed at Houghton Library through Dec. 16 in the exhibit “Altered States: Sex, Drugs, and Transcendence in the Ludlow-Santo Domingo Library.” Radcliffe’s companion show “Altered Gazes,” which opens Oct. 2 at the Schlesinger Library, flips the script with material from the same collection, foregrounding women as creators and consumers of countercultural content. “Although underground comics, X-rated publications, and popular music have often objectified and marginalized female participants,” organizers say, “this exhibition highlights instances where women take charge of the gaze, creating culture instead of merely consuming it.”Oratorical fireIf you missed Cornel West’s convocation address last month, you’ll get another opportunity to catch the Divinity School professor and political activist reprise some of the same themes in a forum and Q&A titled “Spiritual Blackout, Imperial Meltdown, Prophetic Fightback” at the Graduate School of Education on Oct. 4. West raised the idea of a “spiritual blackout in America” in a Boston Globe op-ed last year in which he prescribed “robust democratic education” to treat the nation’s “civic melancholia.”Richard Price will talk about prison reform and research he did for the HBO series “The Night Of.” Photo by Lorraine Adams‘Night Of’ writer talks prison reformRichard Price, a novelist and screenwriter whose credits include “Clockers,” “The Color of Money,” and “The Wire,” will take part in a discussion on Oct. 25 with prison-reform educator Edyson Julio, moderated by novelist Claire Messud, about his recent HBO series “The Night Of.” The show tells the story of a young murder suspect imprisoned at Rikers Island while awaiting trial. This talk is a companion event to a one-on-one Mahindra Humanities Center writers forum with Price and Messud on Oct. 24.Curate your own exhibitA Harvard Art Museums program allows visitors to request pieces of art from the Fogg, Busch-Reisinger, and Arthur M. Sackler museums not currently displayed in the galleries for special viewings in a conference room. The Art Study Center welcomes walk-ins on most Mondays from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. An appointment is required outside of those hours. Also, to complement the American Repertory Theater production of “WARHOLCAPOTE” (through Oct.13), the center is featuring prints from Andy Warhol’s portfolio “Marilyn Monroe” (Sept. 18 and 25, and Oct. 2).The Art of Beatboxing workshop returns to Harvard Oct. 30. Photo by Jake BelcherDroning, mic-dropping, beatboxing Music fans can get their nerd on this semester through a free beatboxing class Oct. 21, co-sponsored by Learning from Performers at the Office for the Arts and the Harvard Ed Portal; an Oct. 11 colloquium on the legacy of Nasir Jones at the Hutchins Center’s Hiphop Archive & Research Institute; a minimalist music film fest (through Sept. 30) at the Harvard Film Archive highlighting scores that inspired the likes of Brian Eno, the Velvet Underground, and Sonic Youth; and an ethnomusicology series launching with a Sept. 26 talk titled “Grooving Heavy, Dancing Drunk,” which will examine the relationship between traditional music, dance, and food in the local Greek community.Dancers move at the Peabody Museum’s Day of the Dead Family Celebration. Photo by Tony RinaldoSports, family, happiness, moreThe Brian Honan 5k road race on Sept. 24 winds through 3 miles of Allston and Brighton and supports organizations such as the YMCA, American Cancer Society, and the Allston Brighton Community Development Corporation, among others. On Oct. 14, residents of Allston-Brighton and Cambridge will get free admission to the Harvard-Lafayette football game, with lunch from the concession stands included.There’s no shortage of family friendly events this fall. For the Peabody’s Day of the Dead celebration on Nov. 4, the museum will be festooned in colorful decorations and alive with the sounds of the Harvard mariachi band. Ballet Folklórico de Aztlán de Harvard will perform. Children are invited to craft sugar skulls ($6), papel picado, and cempasúchil flowers, and compose a message in any language to place on the Día de los Muertos altar.Exchange Tree by David Buckley Borden is one of 12 Hemlock Hospice installations at Harvard Forest.If you’re looking for a good excuse to commune with nature, the new Harvard Forest art installation (opening reception Oct. 7) spotlights the vanishing Eastern hemlock. History and art intersect in Houghton Library exhibits on the Spanish-American War (through June) and Russian Revolution (through Dec. 21), as well as a writing workshop keyed off the play “Men on Boats” about the 1869 Powell Geographic Expedition on the Colorado River (Sept. 27).Big thinkers and political junkies might want to bookmark a few events that attempt to answer big questions: a Sept. 21 Kennedy School talk examining AI’s effect on the workforce called “Will You Still Have a Job When The Robots Arrive?”; a Nov. 2 Radcliffe lecture by Michael Kazin debating “Does the Left Have a Future?”; and an Oct. 3 panel discussion featuring experts from across the university on “The Future of Happiness: How Communication Technologies Will Change Our World — Or Not.”September eventsSept. 18, 25: “Andy Warhol’s ‘Marilyn Monroe’ Portfolio”Sept. 21: “Will You Still Have a Job When the Robots Arrive?”Sept. 24: Brian Honan 5k Road RaceSept. 27: Writing workshop with Jaclyn BackhausThrough Sept. 30: “Synaesthetic Cinema: Minimalist Music and Film”October eventsOct. 2: “Andy Warhol’s ‘Marilyn Monroe’ Portfolio”Oct. 3: “The Future of Happiness: How Communication Technologies Will Change Our World — Or Not”Oct. 4: Cornel West forumOct. 7: “Hemlock Hospice”Oct. 11: “Time Is Illmatic: The Journey, the Music, and Legacy of Nasir Jones”Oct. 10-15: HUBweekOct. 14: Harvard Community Football DayOct. 16: “World in a Drop”Oct. 21: “The Art of Beatboxing: Workshop”Oct. 24: Richard Price in conversation with Claire MessudOct. 25: “The Words to Say It: Giving a Voice to the Incarcerated”November eventsNov. 2: “Does the Left Have a Future?”Nov. 4: Day of the Dead Family CelebrationNov. 16: “How to Hold a Dead Star in Your Hand”Ongoing eventsScience and Cooking series“Altered States: Sex, Drugs, and Transcendence in the Ludlow-Santo Domingo Library”“Altered Gazes: Sex, Drugs and Rock & Roll”Art Study Center“On the Rise: Theodore Roosevelt, the Spanish-American War, and American Imperialism”“The Russian Revolution: Actors and Witnesses in Harvard Library Collections”See the Gazette calendar for complete listings.Top image:HUBweek showcases Boston’s brightest innovators. Learning is worth leaving the house for. Whether you’re interested in science, history, politics, philosophy, art, music, theater, film, technology, cooking, or sports, there’s something happening at Harvard this fall for you.Flour bakery owner Joanne Chang ’91 demonstrates “The Science of Sugar.” Jon Chase/Harvard file photoInquiring minds SEAS’ Science and Cooking series returns with stars such as Joanne Chang ’91 and former White House executive pastry chef Bill Yosses. The series pairs Harvard professors with celebrated food experts and renowned chefs to break down the science behind culinary techniques. It kicks off Sept. 18 with “The Art of Fermentation.”Boston’s brightest innovators will showcase their ideas at HUBweek, a four-day festival (Oct. 12-15) at Government Center that is co-sponsored by Harvard and features speakers such as Atul Gawande, Malcolm Gladwell, and Juliette Kayyem, art exhibits, late-night parties, film screenings, and demos by local startups, tech companies, labs, and universities.If you didn’t get seats to Brian Greene’s sold-out “Space, Time, and Reality” lecture (Sept. 19) and you’re looking for help wrapping your mind, or hands, around the cosmos, the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics hosts monthly observatory nights and on Nov. 16 will demonstrate VR technology that allows you to “hold a dead star in your hand.” The Museum of Natural History’s exhibit “World in a Drop” on Oct. 16 magnifies another universe seldom explored, but on a different scale, revealing the intrinsic beauty of microbes through cutting-edge photo technology.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgNeuroscience has reached an extraordinary inflection point. Knowledge gleaned from decades of fundamental research on the brain can now be leveraged to treat some of the most devastating neurologic and psychiatric conditions.Experts believe that sensory disorders — those affecting vision, hearing, smell, taste, touch, and pain in tens of millions of people across the globe — will be at the forefront of this revolution, in part because the sense organs are more accessible and more easily studied than deeper parts of the brain.Now, the Bertarelli Foundation has announced that it is redoubling its investment in this area of research, with a gift of $6.35 million to Harvard Medical School (HMS) to build on the previous successes of the Bertarelli Program in Translational Neuroscience and Neuroengineering.Established in 2010, the program aims to help bridge the gap between basic and translational neuroscience and address important issues that, once solved, will have life-changing outcomes for patients.“In terms of scientific and medical research, Harvard Medical School remains at the pinnacle, and I am very pleased we are able to develop our partnership with this new program,” said the foundation’s Ernesto Bertarelli, who is a member of the HMS Board of Fellows and a graduate of Harvard Business School. “The School’s openness to exploring new ideas and collaborating with others for the benefit of patients is very important. This new gift aims to support fresh thinking and enable scientists to take forward new ideas, through effective partnership and innovation.” “I am confident that the next five to 10 years will see many new treatments for deafness, blindness and pain …” — David Corey, Bertarelli Professor of Translational Medical Science Of the gift, $5 million will support collaborative research projects focused on understanding and treating sensory disorders, as well as core facilities that will serve as technology incubators. These facilities will develop new instruments and methods that enable previously impossible investigations.“I am confident that the next five to 10 years will see many new treatments for deafness, blindness and pain, and I think the projects of the Bertarelli Program, which encourage cross-disciplinary solutions, will be among the most exciting and effective,” said neurobiologist David Corey, the Bertarelli Professor of Translational Medical Science at HMS and the program’s director.The remaining $1.35 million will support the continuation of an international fellows program, bringing five graduate students from École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) — a research university in Switzerland that specializes in science and engineering — to Boston to complete yearlong academic projects in labs at HMS and its affiliated hospitals.“The Bertarelli Program embodies our quest as physician-scientists to catalyze discovery from bench to bedside,” said HMS Dean George Q. Daley. “The scientists funded over the past eight years have pinpointed some of the most fundamental aberrations at the root of sensory and neurologic disorders, and they are developing treatments that promise to transform the lives of countless patients, thanks to the foresight and generosity of Ernesto Bertarelli and the Bertarelli Foundation.” Collaborative grantsAt the heart of the Bertarelli Program are collaborative grants that bring together scientists, clinicians, and medical specialists from diverse disciplines and institutions to push the boundaries of neuroscience and neuroengineering, creating what Ernesto Bertarelli has called “a melting pot of different talents, passions, and visions united by a commitment to find groundbreaking ways to treat people and to make their lives better.”Eleven grants have been awarded to date — six in 2011 and five in 2014 — to researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital, EPFL, HMS, Jules Gonin Eye Hospital, Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Massachusetts General Hospital, and the Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear.Four additional projects will be funded later this year thanks to renewed support from the Bertarelli Foundation. Each project will include a principal investigator at HMS and a collaborator from HMS, an HMS affiliate, or another institution in the U.S. or elsewhere in the world.Among those awarded a collaborative grant is Konstantina Stankovic, the Sheldon and Dorothea Buckler Chair in Otolaryngology and chief of the Division of Otology and Neurotology at Massachusetts Eye and Ear, and an associate professor of otolaryngology at HMS. Working with Demetri Psaltis at EPFL, her project focuses on developing new diagnostic methods for hearing loss.“This project is a great example of how investigators with markedly different skills and approaches have come together to solve an unmet need,” said Corey. “Stankovic is a superb otologic surgeon, and Psaltis is a world‐class optical engineer. Their work together over the past five years has shown great potential for transforming the way that otologists diagnose hearing loss.”Bertarelli Program funding has allowed Stankovic to focus on a vital clinical need: physicians’ inability to image a patient’s inner-ear cells to establish precise diagnosis and guide therapy. She said that teaming up with Psaltis would not have happened without the program’s funding.“Private philanthropy is critical in allowing us to tackle difficult, high-risk, high-reward projects. The Bertarelli Program has set a very high standard in this regard, and I’m delighted that it will continue to do so,” said Stankovic.In part, the Bertarelli Program provides grants to graduate students conducting their master’s research in an HMS-affiliated laboratory. Bertarelli Fellow Hugo Soulat (left), with his faculty mentor, Emery Brown, the Warren M. Zapol Professor of Anaesthesia at Massachusetts General Hospital. Photo by David Orenstein/MIT Picower Institute for Learning and MemoryEnriching exchangeAnother core component of the Bertarelli Program is its education initiative, which provides grants to EPFL graduate students who come to Boston to spend a year conducting their master’s research in an HMS-affiliated laboratory.“These students are superbly trained in engineering and have strong quantitative and computational backgrounds,” said Corey. “They bring these skills to more clinically oriented laboratories, greatly enriching the host laboratories while learning how to apply their knowledge and talents to important problems in medicine.”Thirty-six Bertarelli Fellows have been supported to date, including Hugo Soulat. Under the faculty mentorship of Emery Brown in the Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care, and Pain Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, Soulat is exploring real-time signal processing of the electroencephalogram to determine the depth of anesthesia during surgery. This will help guide the delivery of the precise amount of anesthesia.Soulat said Brown’s experience as an anesthesiologist and statistician has been invaluable. “Communication between clinicians and scientists faces many hurdles, and therefore I consider myself privileged to work with someone proficient in both languages. As an engineer/mathematician, I am convinced this bridge is necessary for my current work and future career in translational neuroscience,” he said.Brown is grateful for the private fellowship funding provided by the Bertarelli Program because it provides key resources not available through other mechanisms. For example, because the students come to Harvard to do a one-year master’s degree, the laboratory must define concrete, tractable problems that can be solved in that time frame.“We have a number of those types of problems in the area of statistical analysis of neuroscience data,” said Brown. “In general, finding funding and talented students for such projects is next to impossible. Now, not only are the students publishing their work, the successful completion of these projects allows us to write grants to obtain additional funding to support this research.”last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgHere’s a quick roundup of stories you may have missed today. Jon Robin Baitz’s Stonewall Movie to Star Jeremy Irvine Tony nominee Jon Robin Baitz, whose play The Substance of Fire is currently running off-Broadway, has penned the script for the film Stonewall. According to Deadline, the star of the movie War Horse, Jeremy Irvine, has been tapped to appear in the film about the 1969 police-raid of the Stonewall Inn in Greenwich Village, which became the flashpoint for the gay rights movement. Radical New Musical The Anthem to Premiere Off-Broadway Hunger Games meets Ayn Rand In the world premiere of The Anthem off-Broadway. Jason Gotay (Spiderman), Remy Zaken (Spring Awakening) and Randy Jones of The Village People will star in the musical, which has a book by Gary Morgenstein, music by Jonnie Rockwell and lyrics by Erik Ransom. Directed by Rachel Klein, the show begins previews on May 20, with opening set for May 29 at the Lynn Redgrave Theatre. Donna Murphy’s Royal Pains Donna Murphy is set to guest star in season six of USA Network’s Royal Pains, which returns this summer with 13 new episodes. The two-time Tony winner will play Berta, a savvy financial representative.center_img View Comments Frozen’s Still No. 1 as Elsa’s Dresses Run Out The Frozen juggernaut rolls on. According to The New York Times, the Disney movie’s soundtrack is the No.1 album for the ninth time this week with sales of 149,000. Meanwhile, parents are getting desperate for Frozen merchandise. Bloomberg reports that since the official Elsa dress is sold out and it’s going to take up to three months to get new ones in stores, originals are hitting the $1,600 mark on EBay. Let’s look on the bright side: at least Halloween’s covered, right? Broadway Legend Tommy Tune Sets Dates for Cafe Carlyle Show Tommy Tune has scheduled dates for his  Café Carlyle debut. The nine-time Tony winner’s More Taps, Tunes and Tall Tales will play April 22 through May 3 at the swanky New York hotspot.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgEPA PROPOSES TO ADDCOMMERCE STREET PLUME IN WILLISTONTO NATIONAL SUPERFUND LISTJEFFORDS CITES LACK OF FUNDINGWASHINGTON, DC — U.S. Sen. Jim Jeffords, I – Vt, has announced thatthe Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has proposed to add the CommerceStreet Plume in Williston to its National Priority List of Superfundsites. If finalized, the designation would make the site eligible forfederal funding for clean-up and make it Vermont’s 11th federallyrecognized Superfund site.The property is located in an industrial park and is contaminated withbyproducts from manufacturing and electro-plating operations emitted from1960 to 1984. Volatile organic compounds have been detected in nearbydrinking water wells above health based standards and have migrated tostreams and wetlands that are habitat for two state designated threatenedspecies.”I’m glad that the federal government recognizes the importance ofcleaning up this site, but unless the Bush Administration changes itspolicies, there will not be federal funding to begin work on this projectfor some time. With one in four Americans living within four miles of atoxic waste site, we must give the Superfund program the resources itneeds,” said Jeffords, the ranking member of the Senate Environment andPublic Works Committee.Internal EPA documents released earlier this month reveal a record backlogof clean-up projects estimated at $750 million. Just last week, EPA’sInspector General reported that total spending on Superfund between 1999and 2002 declined 11 percent when adjusted for inflation, from $1.71billion to $1.52 billion. More than 1,200 toxic waste sites on theSuperfund National Priority List still await clean-up.Jeffords continued, “I will continue to push the Bush Administration tofully fund the Superfund program so that the Commerce Street Plume andother sites across the nation get cleaned up without delay.”Superfund trust fund has been running short on funds since 1995, when thePolluter Pays tax on corporations expired. The current BushAdministration, unlike every other administration since President Reagan,has not pushed to have it reinstated.Jeffords is a co-sponsor of legislation, S. 173, to re-instate theSuperfund fees on polluters.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgFACT SHEET”State Leadership in Healthcare Act”Section 1332 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act ‘ the ‘Waiver for State Innovation’ ‘ allows states to waiver out of some of the requirement of federal health reform if they meet certain standards.  The provision in the new law was authored by Sens. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and strongly supported by Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-Vt.) and Rep. Peter Welch (D-Vt.).The Sanders-Leahy-Welch ‘State Leadership in Healthcare Act’ moves the availability of state waivers from 2017 to 2014.  This would allow a state to avoid the expense of setting up an exchange ‘ which is otherwise required in every state in 2014 ‘ only to dismantle it later.The federal waiver would allow a state to:a) Collect all the federal funding and use for financing coverage for individuals through a plan designed by and for that state.b) Coordinates this waiver process with Medicare, Medicaid and CHIP waiver processes that may be required depending on the design of the system.  The state The federal waiver would not allow a state to:a) Offer lower quality or less affordable care to their residents than would be available in the exchange.b) Obtain waivers from the health insurance market reforms implemented under the law such as those benefiting ending the use of pre-existing conditions to exclude individuals from coverage or those allowing young adults to stay on their parents’ plans longer.How does the waiver provision of the law work?Step 1: The state passes a law to provide health insurance to its citizens.Step 2: The Secretary of Health and Human Services and Secretary of the Treasury review the state law and determine that the plan is:a) At least as comprehensive as its residents would receive in the exchange;b) At least as affordable; c) Deficit neutral to the federal government; and,d) Covers at least as many people.Step 3: If the federal government finds that the alternative state system meets these requirements without certain federal rules, states can get a waiver.  The state plan could receive waivers from:a) The section requiring establishment of the exchangeb) The designs for how federal subsidies would have to reduce premiums and co-pays.c) The employer penalty for providing coveraged) The individual mandate. Flanking Governor Peter Shumlin at a Statehouse press conference, the Vermont congressional delegation today announced federal legislation to let states in 2014 provide better health care at less cost.A provision by U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) in the new federal health care law allows states to propose pilot programs in 2017. Now Vermont’s congressional delegates ‘ Sen. Patrick Leahy (D), Sanders, and Rep. Peter Welch (D) ‘ have drafted a bill to authorize federal waivers three years sooner. Sanders will introduce the bill in the Senate for himself and Leahy, and Welch will introduce the bill in the House.Sanders said, ‘At a time when 50 million Americans lack health insurance and when the cost of health care continues to soar, it is my strong hope that Vermont will lead the nation in a new direction through a Medicare-for-all single-payer approach. The goal is clear: quality, cost-effective health care for all Vermonters. This is essential not only for the wellbeing of all Vermonters but for job creation.  We must do all we can to lower the crushing costs of health care that are now devastating Vermont businesses and their employees. I look forward to working with Sen. Leahy and Rep. Welch to get the appropriate waivers and flexibility for us to go forward toward a single-payer system.’Welch said, ‘When Vermont innovates, the nation often follows our lead. Providing Vermont and other states with the flexibility to build upon health care reform will result in better care and greater access at a lower cost. Allowing us to become a laboratory for innovation and excellence will help Vermonters, while once again allowing us to lead the way.’Leahy said, ‘While some in Washington are trying to turn the clock back on health reform, Vermont instead is moving forward.  This state waiver bill will give Vermont and other states the choice to go above and beyond what the federal health care law does by devising their own reforms.  Vermont has always been a leader in health care quality and access, and this bill will give our state the flexibility we want to offer Vermonters the best care and coverage while controlling costs.’Shumlin said The Affordable Care Act ‘will bring Vermont critical money to make our health care system work better and to cover some of the uninsured.  We want to do it better and faster than the federal law contemplates. We want to control costs and cover everyone. I am so pleased that our congressional delegation supports us in this effort, and I thank them for introducing this important legislation.  This is just the beginning of this process, and there are other waivers we will need to get it done.  If we work together, I am convinced we can persuade the federal government they should not stand in our way.”This press conference came one day before a report is to be delivered to the state Legislature by William Hsiao, the Harvard University economist, outlining health care options for Vermont that could require a federal waiver to be implemented.The new national health law will provide insurance for 32 million more Americans and make other significant strides, but Leahy, Sanders and Welch said Congress and the Obama administration should let states make additional improvements. Under their bill, states would be able to seek U.S. Health and Human Services Department approval to implement pilot health care systems beginning in 2014.  To qualify, state plans would have to be at least as comprehensive and affordable as the federal model and cover at least as many people. States could not offer lower quality or less affordable coverage. A single-payer system like Vermont is considering or any other state initiative could not cause the federal government to incur more costs.The waiver provision also requires HHS to create a coordinated process so states in a single application also could seek waivers already available under Medicare, Medicaid, and the children’s health insurance program. A fact sheet on the new ‘State Leadership in Healthcare Act’ is available HERE.  Source: Congressional delegation. MONTPELIER, Vt., Jan. 18, 2011 ‘last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgThroughout his three decades in financial services, John Ainsworth has relied on the same operating principle when developing technology solutions.“If we start with the voice of the member and follow that, we’ll always have a high percentage of success,” he tells the CUNA News Podcast.Ainsworth pledges to follow that road map in his new role as president/CEO of CULedger, a credit union industry initiative for developing innovative applications of distributed ledger technology. continue reading » 14SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img

READ MORE

first_imgJakarta Governor Anies Baswedan has said indoor sports centers and gyms may resume operations starting Monday, following the relaxation of large-scale social restrictions (PSBB) in the city.In September, the Jakarta administration reimposed full PSBB in response to an increase in COVID-19 cases in the capital. Anies announced on Sunday that the city had entered the second transitional period and businesses, such as gyms and cinemas, could now open under strict health protocols. “We implemented the emergency brake policy [of full PSBB] for about a month because the number of cases was increasing out of our control. After the number of new cases became more stable, we started to release the brakes slowly, step by step,” Anies said in a statement. The transitional period will last until at least Oct. 25. Fitness centers will be required to comply with health protocols during this time and clean and disinfect their facilities frequently.The new regulations include strict physical distancing rules. During the transitional period, gyms are required to limit their occupancy to 25 percent of their typical capacity and keep a distance of at least two meters between people, antaranews.com reported.Indoor group workouts and training classes are prohibited during the transitional period.In addition to physical distancing, gym owners are also required to prepare air circulation controllers for indoor facilities and ensure all staff members wear face masks, face shields and gloves while working in public areas. Gyms may only open from 6 a.m. to 9 p.m.Read also: Gym rats must be patient for a little while longerThe Jakarta administration is requiring all businesses, including fitness centers, to record visitors in a physical or digital guest book to assist in contact tracing of confirmed cases.Gym members are now required to share their personal data, including full name, the first six digits of their identification card, cell phone number, group size, date of visit and arrival and departure times when visiting fitness  centers.Gyms were required to temporarily stop their operations during the early “new normal” phase.In July, the national COVID-19 task force announced that fitness centers could reopen with strict adherence to health protocols.However, the plans were scrapped in response to soaring numbers of COVID-19 cases in Jakarta. In July, sports physician Andi Kurniawan said gyms were high-risk areas for COVID-19 transmission.  “When someone does physical training like running on the treadmill and they pant, they can release droplets into the air, and there is potential for the virus to spread,” he said. “Gyms are indoor facilities, and various studies show that exercising indoors poses a higher risk of infection compared to exercising outdoors, so it is very important for gyms to apply strict health protocols to prevent the spread of the virus.” (jes) Editor’s note: This article is part of a public campaign by the COVID-19 task force to raise people’s awareness about the pandemic.Topics : #wearmask #keepyourdistance #socialdistance #mothermessage #usesoap #avoidcrowd #washyourhandlast_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgA short but powerful depiction of how legalised euthanasia harms the vulnerable members of our communitylast_img

READ MORE

first_imgLocalNews Dominica affected by gas price increase by: – April 14, 2011 Share Sharing is caring! Share Sharecenter_img The price of gas at the pump has once again increased and is now $14.34 per gallon.However, Minister for Trade Hon. Colin McIntyre says the increase in the price of gas at the pump is not dependant on or has nothing to do with Dominica.He further stated that there are so many other Caribbean islands where the price of gas is much higher than that of Dominica.The trade Minister says that the Government is very concerned when it comes to the increase in gas prices and has dealt with it in the past by removing the customs service charge.He said that that was the reason why government is interesting in the development of the geothermal energy.Mr. McIntyre stated that the Government is monitoring the situation however, stressed that the increase in the prices of gas was not only in Dominica.News Reporter: Grace HendersonDominica Vibes News 11 Views   no discussions Tweetlast_img read more

READ MORE