June 13, 2021
  • 5:51 am Turkmenistan : RFE/RL reporter hounded for snapping supermarket line
  • 5:45 am Indian reporters attacked by local BJP leaders at meeting
  • 5:42 am New UN resolution on safety of journalists
  • 5:41 am Kurdish-born Austrian jailed for 18 months for online “defamation”
  • 5:39 am Director of HornAfrik radio murdered in Mogadishu

first_imgNews Reporters Without Borders welcomes a new resolution on the safety of journalists that the United Nations Human Rights Council adopted today. Proposed by several countries, including France and Austria, it was co-sponsored by more than 90 countries.The new resolution is more specific and concrete about the measures that should be adopted to better protect journalists, and calls on member states “to promote a safe and enabling environment for journalists to perform their work independently.”It says journalists must be protected in peacetime as well as wartime, condemns illegal or arbitrary surveillance of their communications, and calls on states to take concrete measures to combat impunity and to create preventive protection mechanisms. All of these items were among the recommendations submitted by Reporters Without Borders.Like all of the Human Rights Council’s decisions, this resolution is not binding. So that it is not just a statement of principle, UN member states must move into action and must create mechanisms for monitoring compliance with their obligations.——————PR – 09/16/2014RWB issues recommendations on safety of news providersAS the UN Human Rights Council prepares to debate a resolution on the safety of journalists during its 27th session, Reporters Without Borders has called for preventive measures, protection for non-professional as well as professional journalists and greater efforts to combat impunity in the recommendations on this subject that it issued today.RWB will also stress the need to protect all news and information providers when it participates in a Human Rights Council panel discussion on 18 September on the “role of prevention in the promotion and protection of human rights.”According to RWB’s tally, 50 journalists have been killed worldwide since the start of this year while 71 were killed last year. The worst year ever was 2012, with a total of 88 journalists and 50 netizens killed.“Governments must now, as a matter of urgency, take concrete measures because the principles have been accepted and the protection of journalists is unquestionably enshrined in international resolutions and treaties,” Reporters Without Borders secretary-general Christophe Deloire said.“The creation of mechanisms for implementing international law, the establishment of preventive measures such as emergency alert mechanisms, and the adoption of effective and specialized investigative methods are all essential.”RWB’s recommendations stress the need to create procedures for monitoring compliance with UN Security Council Resolution 1738, which says governments must end impunity for crimes of violence against journalists by bringing those responsible to trialTo this end, governments must establish investigative and prosecutorial procedures that are effective. Creating a special adviser to the UN secretary-general or a similar position would be way to monitor that governments are complying with their obligations in this respect.Bloggers and other netizens must receive the same protection as journalists if they are providing the public with news and information. The issue of surveillance of communications must be addressed when considering the safety of journalists, and more training must be given in both physical and digital safety.Reporters Without Borders also calls for the adoption of concrete preventive measures to protect journalists and netizens. The creation of protection programmes, emergency alert and evacuation mechanisms and protected shelters would help prevent violence against news providers who have been threatened.The proposed resolution that the Human Rights Council’s members will examine on 24 September will be the council’s third on the safety of journalists. The first (Resolution 13/24) was adopted on 26 March 2010. The second (Resolution 21/12) was adopted on 26 September 2012.Many UN resolutions have been adopted in the past eight years with the aim of improving protection for journalists, from Security Council Resolution 1738 in 2006 to the General Assembly resolution of 18 December 2013.Reporters Without Borders presented its recommendations to delegations during a Security Council panel discussion on the safety of journalists on 13 December 2013. It also gave the Human Rights Council a written submission on this subject during its 24th session in September 2013 (A/HRC/24/NGO/32) and again during its 26th session in June 2014 (A/HRC/26/NGO/4). RSF_en September 25, 2014 – Updated on January 25, 2016 New UN resolution on safety of journalists Update – 09/25/2014 center_img Help by sharing this information Organisation Related documents safety_journalists_sept2014-2.pdfPDF – 381.24 KB last_img read more

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first_img faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Donald CommunityPCC- COMMUNITYVirtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Make a comment Community News Community News Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy 0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  Business News More Cool Stuff Subscribecenter_img Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday First Heatwave Expected Next Week EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS South Pasadena Music Center and Conservatory to receive the Good Citizen Award for its musically acclaimed contribution to the Pasadena Community. The SPMCC is receiving this honor for their excellent music programs that fill a gap in the arts curriculum abandoned by the public education system.Walter Zooi, founder and director of SPMCC, and his accomplished faculty have been dedicating their time and energy to students by teaching them the discipline and lively qualities of what it truly means to be a musician. SPMCC offers affordable classes in jazz, rock, and classical music. Its roster of instructors include Dr. Yvette Devereaux, Alex Noice, Gavin Templeton, Holland Belle Kerker, Dr. Matthew Brown, Heather Lockie and David Greiman, who all have achieved excellence in their field of music. Having a staff with exceptional skills ensures SPMCC’s students get world class musical education.With summer in full swing, the South Pasadena Music Center and Conservatory has partnered with Levitt Pavilion Foundation to take part in their Summer Concert Series. The students will have an opportunity to showcase their Beatles Project, and will introduce several singer/songwriters in front of an enthusiastic crowd at Pasadena’s Memorial Park, this Friday, August 21st, at 7:00 p.m.“These are memorable and tangible moments of growth for students, and definitely a unique recital experience,” Zooi explains in his director’s message to his subscribers for the SPMCC Newsletter.“South Pasadena Music Center and Conservatory is exactly the kind of program vital to making our community grow and thrive,” says Good Citizen Media Group’s Creative Director Bill Burnett, “That is why we are honoring them with our first Good Citizen Award.”If you know anyone making an impact in your community, and would like to nominate them for the Good Citizen Award please contact Good Citizen Media Group.For more information contact (626) 639-6711, email [email protected] or visit 1026 Mission Street, South Pasadena. Top of the News HerbeautyWant To Seriously Cut On Sugar? You Need To Know A Few TricksHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Most Influential Women In HistoryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyThese Are 15 Great Style Tips From Asian WomenHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 things only girls who live life to the maximum understandHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Reasons Why Ultimatums Are Unhealthy For RelationshipsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty15 Countries Where Men Have Difficulties Finding A WifeHerbeautyHerbeauty Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Community News South Pasadena Music Center & Conservatory Wins Good Citizen Award From STAFF REPORTS Published on Wednesday, August 19, 2015 | 4:30 pmlast_img read more

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first_img Business News HerbeautyAncient Beauty Remedies From India To Swear By For Healthy SkinHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyYou Can’t Go Past Our Healthy Quick RecipesHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHe Is Totally In Love With You If He Does These 7 ThingsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyBet You Didn’t Need Another Reason To Stay Coupled Up This SeasonHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHere Are Indian Women’s Best Formulas For Eternal BeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyHere Is What Scientists Say Will Happen When You Eat AvocadosHerbeautyHerbeauty Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Community News Subscribe faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Virtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * More Cool Stuff Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS Top of the News center_img Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadena 11 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it First Heatwave Expected Next Week Five Acres, a 128 year old child and family services organization based in Altadena California, hosted its annual gala at the historic Gamble House with more than 250 of Pasadena’s leading community members, politicians, supporters, and volunteers on Saturday, June 4, 2016. Gala co-chairs Chris Selak of Lionsgate Entertainment and Sandy Walia of Wells Fargo, along with a dozen dedicated gala sponsorship committee members planned an unforgettable evening to raise funds for Five Acres programs and services. The gala had an exceptional year, bringing in generous donations from live and silent auctions, tickets sales and sponsorships.Chief Advancement Officer Jennifer Berger shares, “This year’s gala was a success largely because of our incredibly supportive donors and volunteers including our amazing gala sponsorship committee. The funds we raised will help to positively change the lives of many children and families in our community and for that I could not be more proud to be a part of the Five Acres family”The evening, inspired by the historic setting, began with an Edwardian themed cocktail garden party featuring hors d’oeuvres by local chef extraordinaire, Claude & Co Catering, and complemented by a silent auction including items from Disney, Warner Bros, Sony Pictures, Universal Studios, local high end restaurants, luxury retailers and a highly anticipated live auction including a trip for two to New York City to visit the set of “Orange is the New Black,” a chance to attend this year’s, “ESPYS” and a stunning Porsche Design Dashboard P’6612 Timepiece. Bling ring? Guests looking fabulous?Celebrity emcees, actors Carla Gugino (Roadies, San Andreas, Entourage) and Matthew Lillard (Scream, The Descendants, Scooby Do 1 & 2.) kept the guests entertained and helped to maintained the positive vibe all evening. A gorgeous 1934 Packard was parked out front of The Gamble House for photo “opps,” The Happiness Band played big band and jazz favorites and the night was capped with a lively dance routine performed by dancers as seen on “Dancing with the Stars” and “So You Think You Can Dance.”Founded in 1888, Five Acres mission is to promote safety, well-being and permanency for children and their families by building on their strengths and empowering them within communities. The funds raised from the event support the more than 8, 500 children and families served by the nonprofit organization. More at 5acres.org. center column 1 Soiree Under the Stars Gala at the Gamble House Raises Funds for Children and Families in Crisis From STAFF REPORTS Published on Tuesday, June 14, 2016 | 12:09 pm Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Make a comment Community Newslast_img read more

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first_img Google+ Facebook By News Highland – October 29, 2015 Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire Homepage BannerNews Twitter Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th EU measures to reduce emissions from farms must be realistic – Mc Guinness Facebook WhatsApp Pinterestcenter_img Google+ 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Previous articleHorgan unsure of line-up for UCD clashNext articleGAA Programme – 28/10/15 News Highland WhatsApp RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR The European Parliament this week approved plans to reduce toxic emissions that cause air pollution.MEPs voted for more ambitious national caps on emissions of six key pollutants including methane and ammonia.The EU says cattle are big culprits when it comes to emitting methane and ammonia, but Midlands North West MEP Mairead McGuinness says the EU has to be realistic when it comes to imposing pollutant reductions on farmers………..Audio Playerhttp://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/10/mcguinngas.mp300:0000:0000:00Use Up/Down Arrow keys to increase or decrease volume. Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Twitter Pinterest 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic last_img read more

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first_imgDCL Yeast (Alloa, Scotland) and Europe’s leading cream yeast specialist Algist Bruggeman (Belgium), both part of the Lesaffre Group, have extended the use of cream yeast away from its traditional plant baking use.The benefits of cream yeast include hygienic handling, accurate dosing, improved mixing, more consistent fermentation, reduced foreign body risk and ultimately a better final baked product, says DCL.The expansion of liquid handling brings these advantages to bakeries using more than 200kg of compressed yeast per week.Known as Stabilised Cream Yeast, it is available in ‘high activity’ for typical UK processes, with a ‘slow’ alternative for longer, flavour-developing fermentation.The cream yeast systems, available with returnable 300-litre or 1,000-litre containers, are now established in the UK, Belgium and Holland, and have the additional benefit of eliminating packaging waste, an increasing problem for bakers, says DCL. The liquid handling equipment can also be automated.last_img read more

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first_imgMake sure you get your entries in for the Baking Industry Awards before the May 7 deadline. The Awards, now in their 23rd year, celebrate the very best of the British baking industry, and are attended by key players from across the industry.The Awards now include two new categories: In-Store Bakery of the Year, sponsored by Dawn Foods; and Speciality Bread Product of the Year, sponsored by Bakels. The deadline for these two categories is 21 May.They are a great way to showcase your talents and achievements to current and potential customers and industry peers, as well as achieving recognition for yourself and your business. The Awards are open to businesses of all sizes, from a one-shop outlet, to the largest industrial plant manufacturers. Entrants do not need to be a supplier of customer of any of the category sponsors.The list of categories to enter is as follows:* Baker of the Year – sponsored by Vandemoortele* In-Store Bakery of the Year – sponsored by Dawn Foods* Confectioner of the Year – sponsored by Rich Products* Bakery Food Manufacturer of the Year – sponsored by ADM Milling* Bakery Supplier of the Year – sponsored by Sainsbury’s* Celebration Cake Maker of the Year – sponsored by Renshawnapier* The Innovation Award – sponsored by Asda* Speciality Bread Product of the Year – sponsored by Bakels* The Craft Business Award – sponsored by Rank Hovis* The Customer Focus Award – sponsored by CSM (United Kingdom)So don’t delay, get your entry form in today! For more details or to enter go to www. bakeryawards.co.uk, or email Kelly Langridge – [email protected] or call 01293 610422.last_img read more

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first_imgThe World Health Organisation (WHO) has been criticised for maintaining its draft guidelines on sugar, following a year-long consultation around the issue.Campaign group Action on Sugar has stated it is ‘appalled’ and ‘disappointed’ by the organisation, after it stated it had little evidence to back up a call for the daily intake of sugar to be limited to 5% of energy intake.The new guideline proposed that sugars should be less than 10% of total energy intake per day – as it had recommended in 2002. It also suggested that a reduction to below 5% of total energy intake per day would have additional benefits- a ’conditional’ suggestion. The sugar organisation said: “There is absolutely NO nutritional requirement for free sugars in our diets, therefore Action on Sugar is disappointed that the 5% recommendation is ‘conditional’.”WHO said: “Given the nature of existing studies, the recommendation of reducing intake of free sugars to below 5% of total energy is presented as “conditional” in the WHO system for issuing evidence-based guidance.“Few epidemiological studies have been undertaken in populations with a low sugar intake. Only three national population-wide studies allow a comparison of dental caries with sugar intakes of less than 5% of total energy intake versus more than 5%, but less than 10% of total energy intake.“WHO issues conditional recommendations – even when the quality of evidence may not be strong on issues of public health importance. A conditional recommendation is one where the desirable effects of adhering to the recommendation probably outweigh the undesirable effects, but these trade-offs need to be clarified; therefore, stakeholder dialogue and consultations are needed before the recommendation is implemented as policy.”Five per cent of total energy intake is equivalent to around 25 grams (around 6 teaspoons) of sugar per day for an adult of normal Body Mass Index (BMI).Action on Sugar is now calling for government action to regulate sugar intake.Professor Graham MacGregor, chairman of Action on Sugar, said: “We have known about the health risks of sugar for years and yet no effective action has been taken – the World Health Organisation has indicated that we should drastically lower our sugar intake, it is time for the UK government, and governments around the world, to take action NOW.”Neville Rigby, Action on Sugar advisor, said: “We demand action now via a pledge from whoever forms the next government to bring in effective regulation. This new recommendation is a red card warning for the confectionery and soft drinks trades to curb their appetite for profit, particularly at the expense of children’s health.”last_img read more

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first_imgJohn Mayer returned to the stage last night, hitting The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon in support of his recently released single, “Love On The Weekend.” Though Mayer had been featured on the show with Dead & Company earlier this year, the guitarist had yet to perform on the program as a solo artist. Fans have been excited about Mayer’s forthcoming album The Search For Everything, especially as he has promised solo tour dates both before and after the Dead & Company summer 2017 engagement.One looming question was, who would Mayer be performing with on this tour? The performance on Fallon gives a strong indication that Mayer will indeed be accompany by John Mayer Trio musicians, drummer Steve Jordan and bassist Pino Palladino. Mayer was also accompanied by James Valentine on acoustic guitar, as well as a pair of backup vocalists providing accompaniment to the new hit song.Thanks to Fallon, we can watch “Love On The Weekend” in full force, streaming below.last_img read more

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first_imgA zine from Radcliffe’s exhibit “Altered Gazes.”What a tripThe Ludlow-Santo Domingo Library contains the world’s largest private trove of popular and underground cultural ephemera related to sex and drugs. Highlights of the 50,000-item collection will be displayed at Houghton Library through Dec. 16 in the exhibit “Altered States: Sex, Drugs, and Transcendence in the Ludlow-Santo Domingo Library.” Radcliffe’s companion show “Altered Gazes,” which opens Oct. 2 at the Schlesinger Library, flips the script with material from the same collection, foregrounding women as creators and consumers of countercultural content. “Although underground comics, X-rated publications, and popular music have often objectified and marginalized female participants,” organizers say, “this exhibition highlights instances where women take charge of the gaze, creating culture instead of merely consuming it.”Oratorical fireIf you missed Cornel West’s convocation address last month, you’ll get another opportunity to catch the Divinity School professor and political activist reprise some of the same themes in a forum and Q&A titled “Spiritual Blackout, Imperial Meltdown, Prophetic Fightback” at the Graduate School of Education on Oct. 4. West raised the idea of a “spiritual blackout in America” in a Boston Globe op-ed last year in which he prescribed “robust democratic education” to treat the nation’s “civic melancholia.”Richard Price will talk about prison reform and research he did for the HBO series “The Night Of.” Photo by Lorraine Adams‘Night Of’ writer talks prison reformRichard Price, a novelist and screenwriter whose credits include “Clockers,” “The Color of Money,” and “The Wire,” will take part in a discussion on Oct. 25 with prison-reform educator Edyson Julio, moderated by novelist Claire Messud, about his recent HBO series “The Night Of.” The show tells the story of a young murder suspect imprisoned at Rikers Island while awaiting trial. This talk is a companion event to a one-on-one Mahindra Humanities Center writers forum with Price and Messud on Oct. 24.Curate your own exhibitA Harvard Art Museums program allows visitors to request pieces of art from the Fogg, Busch-Reisinger, and Arthur M. Sackler museums not currently displayed in the galleries for special viewings in a conference room. The Art Study Center welcomes walk-ins on most Mondays from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. An appointment is required outside of those hours. Also, to complement the American Repertory Theater production of “WARHOLCAPOTE” (through Oct.13), the center is featuring prints from Andy Warhol’s portfolio “Marilyn Monroe” (Sept. 18 and 25, and Oct. 2).The Art of Beatboxing workshop returns to Harvard Oct. 30. Photo by Jake BelcherDroning, mic-dropping, beatboxing Music fans can get their nerd on this semester through a free beatboxing class Oct. 21, co-sponsored by Learning from Performers at the Office for the Arts and the Harvard Ed Portal; an Oct. 11 colloquium on the legacy of Nasir Jones at the Hutchins Center’s Hiphop Archive & Research Institute; a minimalist music film fest (through Sept. 30) at the Harvard Film Archive highlighting scores that inspired the likes of Brian Eno, the Velvet Underground, and Sonic Youth; and an ethnomusicology series launching with a Sept. 26 talk titled “Grooving Heavy, Dancing Drunk,” which will examine the relationship between traditional music, dance, and food in the local Greek community.Dancers move at the Peabody Museum’s Day of the Dead Family Celebration. Photo by Tony RinaldoSports, family, happiness, moreThe Brian Honan 5k road race on Sept. 24 winds through 3 miles of Allston and Brighton and supports organizations such as the YMCA, American Cancer Society, and the Allston Brighton Community Development Corporation, among others. On Oct. 14, residents of Allston-Brighton and Cambridge will get free admission to the Harvard-Lafayette football game, with lunch from the concession stands included.There’s no shortage of family friendly events this fall. For the Peabody’s Day of the Dead celebration on Nov. 4, the museum will be festooned in colorful decorations and alive with the sounds of the Harvard mariachi band. Ballet Folklórico de Aztlán de Harvard will perform. Children are invited to craft sugar skulls ($6), papel picado, and cempasúchil flowers, and compose a message in any language to place on the Día de los Muertos altar.Exchange Tree by David Buckley Borden is one of 12 Hemlock Hospice installations at Harvard Forest.If you’re looking for a good excuse to commune with nature, the new Harvard Forest art installation (opening reception Oct. 7) spotlights the vanishing Eastern hemlock. History and art intersect in Houghton Library exhibits on the Spanish-American War (through June) and Russian Revolution (through Dec. 21), as well as a writing workshop keyed off the play “Men on Boats” about the 1869 Powell Geographic Expedition on the Colorado River (Sept. 27).Big thinkers and political junkies might want to bookmark a few events that attempt to answer big questions: a Sept. 21 Kennedy School talk examining AI’s effect on the workforce called “Will You Still Have a Job When The Robots Arrive?”; a Nov. 2 Radcliffe lecture by Michael Kazin debating “Does the Left Have a Future?”; and an Oct. 3 panel discussion featuring experts from across the university on “The Future of Happiness: How Communication Technologies Will Change Our World — Or Not.”September eventsSept. 18, 25: “Andy Warhol’s ‘Marilyn Monroe’ Portfolio”Sept. 21: “Will You Still Have a Job When the Robots Arrive?”Sept. 24: Brian Honan 5k Road RaceSept. 27: Writing workshop with Jaclyn BackhausThrough Sept. 30: “Synaesthetic Cinema: Minimalist Music and Film”October eventsOct. 2: “Andy Warhol’s ‘Marilyn Monroe’ Portfolio”Oct. 3: “The Future of Happiness: How Communication Technologies Will Change Our World — Or Not”Oct. 4: Cornel West forumOct. 7: “Hemlock Hospice”Oct. 11: “Time Is Illmatic: The Journey, the Music, and Legacy of Nasir Jones”Oct. 10-15: HUBweekOct. 14: Harvard Community Football DayOct. 16: “World in a Drop”Oct. 21: “The Art of Beatboxing: Workshop”Oct. 24: Richard Price in conversation with Claire MessudOct. 25: “The Words to Say It: Giving a Voice to the Incarcerated”November eventsNov. 2: “Does the Left Have a Future?”Nov. 4: Day of the Dead Family CelebrationNov. 16: “How to Hold a Dead Star in Your Hand”Ongoing eventsScience and Cooking series“Altered States: Sex, Drugs, and Transcendence in the Ludlow-Santo Domingo Library”“Altered Gazes: Sex, Drugs and Rock & Roll”Art Study Center“On the Rise: Theodore Roosevelt, the Spanish-American War, and American Imperialism”“The Russian Revolution: Actors and Witnesses in Harvard Library Collections”See the Gazette calendar for complete listings.Top image:HUBweek showcases Boston’s brightest innovators. Learning is worth leaving the house for. Whether you’re interested in science, history, politics, philosophy, art, music, theater, film, technology, cooking, or sports, there’s something happening at Harvard this fall for you.Flour bakery owner Joanne Chang ’91 demonstrates “The Science of Sugar.” Jon Chase/Harvard file photoInquiring minds SEAS’ Science and Cooking series returns with stars such as Joanne Chang ’91 and former White House executive pastry chef Bill Yosses. The series pairs Harvard professors with celebrated food experts and renowned chefs to break down the science behind culinary techniques. It kicks off Sept. 18 with “The Art of Fermentation.”Boston’s brightest innovators will showcase their ideas at HUBweek, a four-day festival (Oct. 12-15) at Government Center that is co-sponsored by Harvard and features speakers such as Atul Gawande, Malcolm Gladwell, and Juliette Kayyem, art exhibits, late-night parties, film screenings, and demos by local startups, tech companies, labs, and universities.If you didn’t get seats to Brian Greene’s sold-out “Space, Time, and Reality” lecture (Sept. 19) and you’re looking for help wrapping your mind, or hands, around the cosmos, the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics hosts monthly observatory nights and on Nov. 16 will demonstrate VR technology that allows you to “hold a dead star in your hand.” The Museum of Natural History’s exhibit “World in a Drop” on Oct. 16 magnifies another universe seldom explored, but on a different scale, revealing the intrinsic beauty of microbes through cutting-edge photo technology.last_img read more

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first_imgNeuroscience has reached an extraordinary inflection point. Knowledge gleaned from decades of fundamental research on the brain can now be leveraged to treat some of the most devastating neurologic and psychiatric conditions.Experts believe that sensory disorders — those affecting vision, hearing, smell, taste, touch, and pain in tens of millions of people across the globe — will be at the forefront of this revolution, in part because the sense organs are more accessible and more easily studied than deeper parts of the brain.Now, the Bertarelli Foundation has announced that it is redoubling its investment in this area of research, with a gift of $6.35 million to Harvard Medical School (HMS) to build on the previous successes of the Bertarelli Program in Translational Neuroscience and Neuroengineering.Established in 2010, the program aims to help bridge the gap between basic and translational neuroscience and address important issues that, once solved, will have life-changing outcomes for patients.“In terms of scientific and medical research, Harvard Medical School remains at the pinnacle, and I am very pleased we are able to develop our partnership with this new program,” said the foundation’s Ernesto Bertarelli, who is a member of the HMS Board of Fellows and a graduate of Harvard Business School. “The School’s openness to exploring new ideas and collaborating with others for the benefit of patients is very important. This new gift aims to support fresh thinking and enable scientists to take forward new ideas, through effective partnership and innovation.” “I am confident that the next five to 10 years will see many new treatments for deafness, blindness and pain …” — David Corey, Bertarelli Professor of Translational Medical Science Of the gift, $5 million will support collaborative research projects focused on understanding and treating sensory disorders, as well as core facilities that will serve as technology incubators. These facilities will develop new instruments and methods that enable previously impossible investigations.“I am confident that the next five to 10 years will see many new treatments for deafness, blindness and pain, and I think the projects of the Bertarelli Program, which encourage cross-disciplinary solutions, will be among the most exciting and effective,” said neurobiologist David Corey, the Bertarelli Professor of Translational Medical Science at HMS and the program’s director.The remaining $1.35 million will support the continuation of an international fellows program, bringing five graduate students from École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) — a research university in Switzerland that specializes in science and engineering — to Boston to complete yearlong academic projects in labs at HMS and its affiliated hospitals.“The Bertarelli Program embodies our quest as physician-scientists to catalyze discovery from bench to bedside,” said HMS Dean George Q. Daley. “The scientists funded over the past eight years have pinpointed some of the most fundamental aberrations at the root of sensory and neurologic disorders, and they are developing treatments that promise to transform the lives of countless patients, thanks to the foresight and generosity of Ernesto Bertarelli and the Bertarelli Foundation.” Collaborative grantsAt the heart of the Bertarelli Program are collaborative grants that bring together scientists, clinicians, and medical specialists from diverse disciplines and institutions to push the boundaries of neuroscience and neuroengineering, creating what Ernesto Bertarelli has called “a melting pot of different talents, passions, and visions united by a commitment to find groundbreaking ways to treat people and to make their lives better.”Eleven grants have been awarded to date — six in 2011 and five in 2014 — to researchers at Boston Children’s Hospital, EPFL, HMS, Jules Gonin Eye Hospital, Massachusetts Eye and Ear, Massachusetts General Hospital, and the Schepens Eye Research Institute of Massachusetts Eye and Ear.Four additional projects will be funded later this year thanks to renewed support from the Bertarelli Foundation. Each project will include a principal investigator at HMS and a collaborator from HMS, an HMS affiliate, or another institution in the U.S. or elsewhere in the world.Among those awarded a collaborative grant is Konstantina Stankovic, the Sheldon and Dorothea Buckler Chair in Otolaryngology and chief of the Division of Otology and Neurotology at Massachusetts Eye and Ear, and an associate professor of otolaryngology at HMS. Working with Demetri Psaltis at EPFL, her project focuses on developing new diagnostic methods for hearing loss.“This project is a great example of how investigators with markedly different skills and approaches have come together to solve an unmet need,” said Corey. “Stankovic is a superb otologic surgeon, and Psaltis is a world‐class optical engineer. Their work together over the past five years has shown great potential for transforming the way that otologists diagnose hearing loss.”Bertarelli Program funding has allowed Stankovic to focus on a vital clinical need: physicians’ inability to image a patient’s inner-ear cells to establish precise diagnosis and guide therapy. She said that teaming up with Psaltis would not have happened without the program’s funding.“Private philanthropy is critical in allowing us to tackle difficult, high-risk, high-reward projects. The Bertarelli Program has set a very high standard in this regard, and I’m delighted that it will continue to do so,” said Stankovic.In part, the Bertarelli Program provides grants to graduate students conducting their master’s research in an HMS-affiliated laboratory. Bertarelli Fellow Hugo Soulat (left), with his faculty mentor, Emery Brown, the Warren M. Zapol Professor of Anaesthesia at Massachusetts General Hospital. Photo by David Orenstein/MIT Picower Institute for Learning and MemoryEnriching exchangeAnother core component of the Bertarelli Program is its education initiative, which provides grants to EPFL graduate students who come to Boston to spend a year conducting their master’s research in an HMS-affiliated laboratory.“These students are superbly trained in engineering and have strong quantitative and computational backgrounds,” said Corey. “They bring these skills to more clinically oriented laboratories, greatly enriching the host laboratories while learning how to apply their knowledge and talents to important problems in medicine.”Thirty-six Bertarelli Fellows have been supported to date, including Hugo Soulat. Under the faculty mentorship of Emery Brown in the Department of Anesthesia, Critical Care, and Pain Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital, Soulat is exploring real-time signal processing of the electroencephalogram to determine the depth of anesthesia during surgery. This will help guide the delivery of the precise amount of anesthesia.Soulat said Brown’s experience as an anesthesiologist and statistician has been invaluable. “Communication between clinicians and scientists faces many hurdles, and therefore I consider myself privileged to work with someone proficient in both languages. As an engineer/mathematician, I am convinced this bridge is necessary for my current work and future career in translational neuroscience,” he said.Brown is grateful for the private fellowship funding provided by the Bertarelli Program because it provides key resources not available through other mechanisms. For example, because the students come to Harvard to do a one-year master’s degree, the laboratory must define concrete, tractable problems that can be solved in that time frame.“We have a number of those types of problems in the area of statistical analysis of neuroscience data,” said Brown. “In general, finding funding and talented students for such projects is next to impossible. Now, not only are the students publishing their work, the successful completion of these projects allows us to write grants to obtain additional funding to support this research.”last_img read more

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