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first_img By Danielle TumminioPosted Sep 17, 2012 Rector Pittsburgh, PA An Evening with Aliya Cycon Playing the Oud Lancaster, PA (and streaming online) July 3 @ 7 p.m. ET Ya no son extranjeros: Un diálogo acerca de inmigración Una conversación de Zoom June 22 @ 7 p.m. ET Statements and opinions expressed in the articles and communications herein, are those of the author(s) and not necessarily those of Episcopal News Service or the Episcopal Church. Assistant/Associate Rector Washington, DC Director of Music Morristown, NJ Rector Bath, NC Family Ministry Coordinator Baton Rouge, LA Curate Diocese of Nebraska Comments (1) The Church Pension Fund Invests $20 Million in Impact Investment Fund Designed to Preserve Workforce Housing Communities Nationwide Church Pension Group September 17, 2012 at 10:36 am Well said Danielle. Having flown in planes for sevearl years in the USAF, I fully understand. It’s nice to know God is in TOTAL control, even when it does’nt seem like it. And that one day, we will be on solid ground with HIM who took care of the turbulence of our lives. Great story………….. Rector Albany, NY In-person Retreat: Thanksgiving Trinity Retreat Center (West Cornwall, CT) Nov. 24-28 Curate (Associate & Priest-in-Charge) Traverse City, MI Rector (FT or PT) Indian River, MI Virtual Episcopal Latino Ministry Competency Course Online Course Aug. 9-13 TryTank Experimental Lab and York St. John University of England Launch Survey to Study the Impact of Covid-19 on the Episcopal Church TryTank Experimental Lab What faith in flight teaches about faith in God Rector/Priest in Charge (PT) Lisbon, ME Assistant/Associate Rector Morristown, NJ Danielle Tumminio[Episcopal News Service] “Are we safe?” I asked.  My husband and I were sitting in our cramped coach seats at 30,000 feet, the airplane fluttering.  He gazed out the window, undisturbed by the turbulence, while I grabbed his arm and hoped that his physics background could reason away my anxiety.“This is totally safe,” he said.“Are you sure?” I said“Yes,” he said.  “This is so normal that the cabin crew is distributing coffee.”I saw a flight attendant pouring java for an aisle passenger, unfazed by the bumps, adding a little cream.  My husband is right, I thought.Yet I still couldn’t get used to the jolting sensation, and I wished I could make it stop.“Are you sure that you’re sure that it’s safe?” I said as a follow-up“I am sure that I’m sure,” he said.  And then my husband launched into an eminently reasonable explanation about what causes turbulence: molecules in hotter, denser air moving to cooler, less dense space, kind of like air osmosis.It was nature.It was normal.We would not crash because of this.I knew his reasoning made intellectual sense and yet, I still found myself gripping his arm in panic because, as for many others, flying makes me nervous.I don’t like not having my feet on solid ground.  There’s something unnerving to me about that.I think it’s more likely than not that the dislike of flying that I and many other Americans share is rooted in needing control like Linus needs his blanket.  But control disappears on plane rides: We don’t know how to fly a plane.  We don’t know what those dings! are that go off sporadically during a flight; we don’t know why flight attendants say, “Prepare for cross-check,” and we have absolutely no idea what cross-checking is.And if we’re not in control, that means we have to have faith in the people who are: In the pilot, the co-pilot, the flight attendants, the mechanics who check the plane’s gadgets and the workers who load the luggage and the mysterious people in the flight control tower.We have to have faith in all of them.But faith isn’t easy, especially when it’s faith in things unseen, like airplane pilots and flight control workers.And God.As I sat on that plane, I realized that in many ways, our lives in faith are a bit like one long plane ride—sometimes the seatbelt sign goes off and we can roam about the cabin, unthreatened, feeling entirely secure.And sometimes the seatbelt sign is on, the turbulence are jarring and maybe the oxygen mask doesn’t drop, and we have to wonder: Is God not piloting this flight through life?  Or worse yet, is God piloting and doesn’t care about our comfort?There are no easy answers to such difficult questions—as Job discovered, asking God for answers doesn’t always lead to great clarity or consolation.  Indeed, a life of faith is a life of conviction in things unseen: It means believing that what is worse will get better, that suffering will not have the last word, that God is a fearless, wise pilot for our journey.Ours is not an easy faith, especially when life’s turbulence set in.But while we don’t know when and where bumps will strike our flight through life, we can be certain of two things.  The first is this: that we are never alone.  Like passengers on an airplane, we don’t travel in isolation—in fact, sometimes we’re so cramped in that we pray for more space!  Their bumps are our bumps, and our bumps are theirs.  This is not a journey we go through alone, and there is always a hand we can give in support or an arm we can clutch if we need it.As for the second, it is this: As with an air traveler, our lives are a journey, always moving from one point to the next.  Any clouds, any turbulence we strike—they’re only for a time.  Because like any plane, we are in motion, heading towards a destination.  Our plane will ultimately land.  We will one day arrive at the kingdom beyond, that destination where we can finally snap open our metaphorical seatbelts and greet God—our pilot—as we disembark.There we will finally be on solid ground.And knowing that may make the journey just a little less intimidating.  It may even make life’s turbulence a little easier to bear.– The Rev. Danielle Tumminio lectures at Yale University and is the author of “God and Harry Potter at Yale.” She currently serves as an interim associate at St. Anne in-the-Fields Episcopal Church in Lincoln, Massachusetts. Comments are closed. Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York Hires Reverend Kevin W. VanHook, II as Executive Director Episcopal Charities of the Diocese of New York New Berrigan Book With Episcopal Roots Cascade Books Associate Rector for Family Ministries Anchorage, AK Submit a Press Release Youth Minister Lorton, VA Seminary of the Southwest announces appointment of two new full time faculty members Seminary of the Southwest Submit a Job Listing Featured Jobs & Calls Missioner for Disaster Resilience Sacramento, CA Virtual Celebration of the Jerusalem Princess Basma Center Zoom Conversation June 19 @ 12 p.m. ET Rector Collierville, TN Canon for Family Ministry Jackson, MS Episcopal Migration Ministries’ Virtual Prayer Vigil for World Refugee Day Facebook Live Prayer Vigil June 20 @ 7 p.m. ET Assistant/Associate Priest Scottsdale, AZ This Summer’s Anti-Racism Training Online Course (Diocese of New Jersey) June 18-July 16 Rector Knoxville, TN AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to PrintFriendlyPrintFriendlyShare to FacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailShare to MoreAddThis Priest-in-Charge Lebanon, OH Submit an Event Listing Associate Rector Columbus, GA Director of Administration & Finance Atlanta, GA The Church Investment Group Commends the Taskforce on the Theology of Money on its report, The Theology of Money and Investing as Doing Theology Church Investment Group Rector Shreveport, LA Episcopal Church releases new prayer book translations into Spanish and French, solicits feedback Episcopal Church Office of Public Affairs Inaugural Diocesan Feast Day Celebrating Juneteenth San Francisco, CA (and livestream) June 19 @ 2 p.m. PT Cathedral Dean Boise, ID Associate Priest for Pastoral Care New York, NY Rector Hopkinsville, KY Rector Belleville, IL Fr. Michael Neal says: Remember Holy Land Christians on Jerusalem Sunday, June 20 American Friends of the Episcopal Diocese of Jerusalem Rector Smithfield, NC Rector Washington, DC Rector Tampa, FL Join the Episcopal Diocese of Texas in Celebrating the Pauli Murray Feast Online Worship Service June 27 Course Director Jerusalem, Israel Rector and Chaplain Eugene, OR An Evening with Presiding Bishop Curry and Iconographer Kelly Latimore Episcopal Migration Ministries via Zoom June 23 @ 6 p.m. ET Bishop Diocesan Springfield, IL Rector Martinsville, VA Featured Events Priest Associate or Director of Adult Ministries Greenville, SC Press Release Servicelast_img read more

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first_img AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Theyrule.net is not a live database of companies and their directors. The creator hopes to update it annually, but admits that it “is a starting point for research about these powerful individuals and corporations.”In some ways, the arresting graphical presentation of the links must make some fundraising researchers yearn for someone to create such a resource for top UK business people and companies. Knowing who knows whom is vital, but knowing who has corporate links with whom would be a pretty good starting place. About Howard Lake Howard Lake is a digital fundraising entrepreneur. Publisher of UK Fundraising, the world’s first web resource for professional fundraisers, since 1994. Trainer and consultant in digital fundraising. Founder of Fundraising Camp and co-founder of GoodJobs.org.uk. Researching massive growth in giving. Tagged with: Prospect research Recruitment / people Theyrule.net attempts to demonstrate the links between major US companies and their directors, some of the most powerful organisations and individuals in the world.It is not intended as a research tool for fundraisers, but it can show prospect researchers just how complicated some of the business links between American company directors can be.The site is an interactive, Flash-based presentation, and allows you to seek links between various companies. Some directors sit on the boards of half a dozen top 500 US companies. Advertisementcenter_img  17 total views,  1 views today AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to LinkedInLinkedInShare to EmailEmailShare to WhatsAppWhatsAppShare to MessengerMessengerShare to MoreAddThis Links between top US companies and directors revealed at theyrule.net Howard Lake | 24 June 2004 | Newslast_img read more

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first_imgReddIt Robbie Vagliohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/robbie-vaglio/ World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution Robbie Vagliohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/robbie-vaglio/ Twitter print Linkedin TCU wants ex-professor’s discrimination suit dismissed What to watch during quarantine Robbie Vaglio ReddIt Robbie Vagliohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/robbie-vaglio/ Linkedincenter_img Snow temporarily stepping down as honors dean Two students joined harassment and discrimination lawsuit against TCU Facebook Facebook I am the executive editor of TCU 360 from Raleigh, North Carolina. If you walk by my desk in the newsroom you’ll immediately know I’m Post Malone’s biggest fan. I’m always looking for a good story to tell! If you have any story ideas, feel free to reach out! Go Panthers! Previous articleV-Day Campaign hosts drag show to raise donations, awareness for LGBT+ issuesNext articleActivists, Boschini clash over demands for immigrant students Robbie Vaglio RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Robbie Vagliohttps://www.tcu360.com/author/robbie-vaglio/ Twitter TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history + posts Welcome TCU Class of 2025last_img read more

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first_imgFrom chill pills to study pills Facebook ReddIt ReddIt TCU student, Emma Patterson, practice the connecting principle with Huck, an orphan under Show Hope’s care. Pictured by: Hilliary Cheatham Diversity, equity and inclusion not taking a break Twitter Taylor Brumbaugh is a journalism major and business minor from Bedford, Texas. She enjoys online shopping and watching Brooklyn 99 in her free time. Her puppy, a labradoodle named DIxie, is her world. Go Cowboys! Welcome TCU Class of 2025 Taylor Brumbaughhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/taylor-brumbaugh/ Book authored by youngest Global Innovator Linkedin Twitter Taylor Brumbaughhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/taylor-brumbaugh/ Taylor Brumbaugh printStudents and advisors heading to China this summer are going to have to pack light and tight. Although each can bring two suitcases, one will likely be filled with donated items for more than 300 children in orphan care centers. TCU’s Child Development in China program Donations is accepting donations until April 26 on the Amazon Wish List to help The Karyn Purvis Institute of Child Development (KPICD) and Show Hope.“Clothing items are more fun to buy,” said Sarah Cronin, an education team member and study abroad advisor. “However, some of the non-clothing items such as bandages and toothpaste are needed more.”Cronin said there are 17 students going on the trip and three advisors.TCU student, Merrill Douglass, and Ellis, a child under the care of Show Hope, practice the connecting principle during story time. Photo courtesy of Hilliary Cheatham.“Our hope is to fill 20 suitcases to the brim,” Cronin said. The donations will be delivered to Maria’s Big House of Hope, the orphan center, where they will stay for two weeks.Students on the trip are child development majors or minors who learned about the connection principal of physical interaction and connection, such as play, eye contact and cuddling to let at-risk children know they are special and valued. They learned this principle through KPICD’s main program, Trusted Based Relations Intervention (TBRI).The main goal is to “live-action demonstrate the connection principle for the care centers’ staff, and for the students to gain some hands-on experience,” said Ashley West, an education team member, who went last year.According to Child & Youth Services, TBRI is “a therapeutic model that trains caregivers to provide effective support and treatment for at-risk children.”Along with visiting various care centers, students get an exciting glimpse of China’s culture by visiting the Great Wall, Terracotta Warriors, Shaolin Temple and Chinese acrobats.“A lot of the children we see have special or medical needs, and it can be emotionally draining being around that environment for long periods of time,” Cronin said. “These activities allow the students to relieve some of the heavier emotions that weigh on them after visits to the care centers.” Taylor Brumbaughhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/taylor-brumbaugh/ + posts Facebook Taylor Brumbaughhttps://www.tcu360.com/author/taylor-brumbaugh/ Previous articleMen’s basketball scores season-low in NIT semifinals loss to TexasNext articleBaseball defeats UT-Arlington 3-2 in rare “balk-off” Taylor Brumbaugh RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR TCU places second in the National Student Advertising Competition, the highest in school history World Oceans Day shines spotlight on marine plastic pollution IT plans to upgrade TCU’s telephone system Linkedinlast_img read more

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first_imgNews December 12, 2019 Find out more Reporters Without Borders (RSF) has joined 23 other organisations in expressing solidarity with the Swedish business and finance publication, Realtid, its editor, and the two journalists being sued for defamation in London. Realtid are due before the High Court on 24 March for a two-day remote hearing that will decide whether England and Wales is the appropriate jurisdiction for the case to be heard. RSF and 60 other organisations call for an EU anti-SLAPP directive March 23, 2021 Solidarity with Swedish media outlet Realtid ahead of UK defamation case hearing RSF_en News News to go further Help by sharing this information SLAPP lawsuit taken against Swedish online magazine Realtid in London December 2, 2020 Find out more United KingdomSwedenEurope – Central Asia News Follow the news on Europe – Central Asia United KingdomSwedenEurope – Central Asia Organisation Free expression groups call on Arron Banks to drop SLAPP lawsuit against Carole Cadwalladr Realtid is being sued by Swedish businessman, Svante Kumlin, and his group of companies Eco Energy World (EEW), for eight articles that they published last year. Realtid had been investigating EEW ahead of an impending stock market launch in Norway, a matter of clear public interest. Prior to publication, the journalists contacted Kumlin and EEW to request an interview and reply, but neither were provided. In November 2020, Kumlin and EEW filed a defamation lawsuit at the High Court in London against Realtid, its editor-in-chief, and the two reporters behind the investigations.“We are concerned about the use of litigation tactics to intimidate journalists into silence,” five international freedom of expression and media freedom organisations wrote in a statement last December, which condemned the legal action and deemed it a strategic lawsuit against public participation (SLAPP). SLAPPs are a form of vexatious legal action used to silence public watchdogs, including journalists.The hearing is expected to conclude at lunchtime on Thursday 25 March, but the judgement that will decide whether England and Wales is an appropriate jurisdiction for the case to be heard is likely to be reserved for a later date. Although Realtid is a Swedish-language outlet based in Sweden and Kumlin is domiciled in Monaco, Kumlin and EEW claim to have “significant business interests” in England that, they claim, provide sufficient grounds for the case being brought in the UK.Ahead of the hearing we, the undersigned organisations, express our solidarity with Realtid. We are extremely concerned that this SLAPP appears to be an effort to discredit the journalists and force them to remove their investigative articles.Signed:Reporters Without Borders (RSF)Index on CensorshipARTICLE 19Civil Liberties Union for Europe (Liberties)European Centre for Press and Media Freedom (ECPMF)IFEXInternational Press InstituteOBC TranseuropaNational Union of Journalists in the UK and Ireland (NUJ)Justice for Journalists FoundationSwedish Union of JournalistsOrganized Crime and Corruption Reporting ProjectMighty EarthPEN InternationalEuropean Federation of Journalists (EFJ)English PENSwedish PENBlueprint for Free Speech ProtectMedia DefenceInternational Media SupportThe Daphne Caruana Galizia FoundationGlobal WitnessPublicistklubben December 9, 2020 Find out more Receive email alertslast_img read more

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first_img Matthew Stringer, left; Missi Walden WhatsApp Summer Spaghetti SaladCreamy Fruit SaladSouthern Style Potato SaladPowered By 10 Sec Mama’s Deviled Eggs NextStay What: Justice of the Peace Precinct 2How long: Four years.Salary: $63,712; auto allowance – $5,050; fringe benefits – $28,578. If You Go Church leaders condemn mayor’s disparaging comments Twitter WhatsApp Landgraf staffer resigns following investigation Facebook Home Local News Government JP runoff early voting begins May 14 Local NewsGovernment JP runoff early voting begins May 14 Facebook Voters will choose between two candidates for Precinct 2 Justice of the Peace when early voting begins May 14: a courtroom administrator with nearly three decades of courtroom experience and a jeweler active in local politics.Missi Walden and Matthew Stringer are on the ballot for the runoff, following a March Republican primary that dwindled down the wide field of seven candidates to two.Justices of the Peace handle class C misdemeanor cases, like traffic tickets, and small claim civil cases with a jurisdictional limit of $10,000, such as landlord and tenant disputes. They also set bonds, sign arrest warrants and certain search warrants and protective orders and provide marriage licenses.Walden says her experience in the courtroom will help to run an organized and efficient office. Stringer touts a self-education in the law and goals of a more accountable and efficient office.There is no Democratic candidate for the position, so whoever wins the runoff is the winner, and could be appointed to the position by the Commissioners’ Court as soon as June.The seat has been empty since Judge Christopher Clark vacated the position in January to fill the vacant seat of County Court at Law No. 2.Walden received 1,361 votes in the March primary, about 32 percent of the vote, followed by Stringer, who received 982 votes, about 23 percent of the vote.But turnout could be far less for the runoff, as they are the only local election on the ballot, and voters may not know all of what a justice of the peace does.“For a lot of people, they don’t think that the justice of the peace court is that important to them until they have a case that they have to go before them, and then they realize that it is important to them,” she said. “If you have a case where you’re suing somebody for $5,000 or $10,000, that’s important to you.”Stringer said the jurisdiction of the office reflected the issues important to everyday citizens, and is by design an office that sits close to the people.Each candidate has questioned their opponent’s qualifications.Walden, 51, has worked in the legal field in administrative roles for the last 27 years, most recently working as the court coordinator for the 161st District Court of Judge John Smith for the last seven years.As a court coordinator, Walden said she has been involved in thousands of hearings and trials during her career, giving her an understanding of the trial process and how hearings are supposed to be run.“That’s experience that nobody else will have and I can go in and start running hearings and know how everything works,” she said.But Stringer said he has articulated a stronger knowledge of the law during his campaign through his own study of the position, and says he has been civilly involved for a number of years in state legislature.“They might not be making the headlines, but every individual person that comes in there, if you have a case, it is important to you, and to have somebody on that bench who understands that it’s important to you,” Stringer said.Stringer described Walden’s job as a court coordinator as secretarial. But Walden said her job gives her the experience to understand the processes of running trials and hearings — something Stringer has no experience in.“I don’t see how anybody could be an expert in the law without going to law school,” Walden said. “I would never claim to know everything about the law or be an expert in the law, and I know when I go in there, there are going to be things that I have to learn still.”Whoever is sworn into office as the JP after the runoff will be required to take 80 hours of training, but that training won’t begin until December.Stringer said he would serve the community by helping to deal with the county’s criminal justice infrastructure, namely the courthouse, which city and county officials are attempting to solve, but Walden said the justice of the peace doesn’t have a say in the issue.“The justice of the peace doesn’t set any laws or policies,” Walden said. “You can talk to them and give them your opinion, but you really don’t have a say in what ultimately happens.”While the justice of the peace doesn’t have any say in any matters regarding governing or legislation, Stringer said he would still like to be involved in talking about issues with citizens and relaying them to county commissioners.“My point is the justice of the peace is a public servant just like every other elected official down at the courthouse,” Stringer said. “And as a judge and a public servant, you have a duty to report back to the people that you work for what you need to do your job.”One of the big changes Walden said she would like to bring to the justice of the peace court is to make the court system as paperless as possible, something she has already done in the 161st District Court, with a goal of greater transparency and easier access.Stringer said he was concerned whether the paperless system would be conducive to the nature of the justice court as the people’s court, as most people file without representation.Previously, Stringer served as a Republican national Delegate in 2012, and served as a Presidential Elector of the Electoral College under the Trump/Pence ticket during the 2016 election.Walden pointed out her experience in the courtroom.“The biggest distinction is that I have 27 years of legal experience and I’ve actually worked in the courts and understand the processes of the courts,” Walden said.Stringer has been endorsed by Gun Owners of America, as well as by Dick Saulsbury, founder of Saulsbury Industries, and Ector County Hospital District board members Brynn Dodd, Don Hallmark and Ben Quiroz.While Walden said she saw this election was coming and felt she was the most qualified person of those who were running, and said Smith supported her decision to run, so she decided to go for the position.Stringer said the idea of running for the justice of the peace came after someone close to him asked him to run but declined to say who.“What really appealed to me is the office sits close to the people at the precinct level, and that it’s an opportunity to truly step up and serve the community,” Stringer said.Stringer said he would also like to publish an annual accountability report, telling the public how many cases the office filed, what their budget was and how much was spent in a year.Walden questioned the purpose in doing so when case information and the budget can already be found online.Stringer said he was also interested in asking commissioners to task a constable with seeking out outstanding warrants, which Stringer said there is a large number of in the justice court, as a way to increase county revenue, but that would rely on commissioner approval.Stringer also said that the constables don’t really do anything right now, outside of deal with truancy and transport money for the county.Walden said the county had looked at the idea of adding a warrant officer before, but that it would not bring in as much money as it would cost to be implemented. She also said that it would hinder the jail, which already has an overcrowding problem, and most of the people with these outstanding warrants aren’t hardened criminals.Stringer said that his proposed idea of instating a constable would allow him to call people with outstanding warrants to try to get them to take care of the fine without being taken to jail.The runoff election for the position will take place on May 22, with polls open from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. Early voting will begin May 14 and conclude May 18. Whoever wins the runoff will be the de facto winner, as there is no Democratic challenger for the position.Precinct 3 Justice of the Peace Sherwood Kupper said he thinks the residents of a precinct would want a person knowledgeablein the law sitting on the bench.“A JP court is intended not to require legal representation, so you would want a judge that handles fairness,” Kupper said.Just The Facts First day of early voting: May 14.Last day of early voting: May 18.Election Day: May 22. Pinterest Previous articleSantorellis to retire after more than 30 yearsNext articleHIGH SCHOOL SPORTS: Baseball bi-district, softball area-round scoreboards admin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Pinterest By admin – May 6, 2018 Landgraf prepares for state budget debate Twitterlast_img read more

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first_img WhatsApp WhatsApp News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th Pinterest Twitter Google+ Diversions are in place on the Donegal Town side of Dunkineely following a collision earlier this afternoon.Gardai say they expect the route to be cleared shortly once the scene of the crash is clear.Emergency services attended the scene, but there are no reports of serious injuries Homepage BannerNews Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Facebook Google+ By News Highland – June 4, 2019 center_img RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Previous articleNew car registrations in Donegal down 10.35%Next articleBrian Burnie is walking 7,000km around Britain and Ireland News Highland Diversions in place following Dunkineely crash Pinterest Facebook Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Twitter Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Community Enhancement Programme open for applicationslast_img read more

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first_imgLatest Stories Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits A younger Outlaw poses in her cheer uniform for Pike County. Outlaw reflected on her time spent as a Pike County High School cheerleader during the 1950s.SUBMITTED PHOTO“Wash ’em out; ring ’em out! Hang ’em on the line. We can beat (Elba) any ol’ time!”That’s not a cheer that will be yelled at any high school football games these Friday nights. However, Juanita Richards (Skeeter) Outlaw said that’s the kind of cheer that got football fans on their collective feet and rallied the troops when she was head cheerleader at Pike County High School. She did not say the year.“Back then, cheerleaders led cheers and got the crowd into the game,” Outlaw said. “Nowadays, cheerleaders look more like gymnasts and they wear cute, little uniforms. We wore wool skirts and wool sweaters and white tennis shoes. But, we didn’t get all that hot because we didn’t start to school until after Labor Day. The boys started practicing football after we started school and didn’t play a game until about October. It was cool then – most of the time.” Book Nook to reopen Pike County pride: Outlaw shares stories of being a Pike County cheerleader Published 8:00 am Thursday, September 4, 2014 “When all the team joins in and falls in line. We’re going to fight to win this game another time. We’re going to shout and shout for victory and let our name go down in history. The results will always be the same. In the end you’ll hear the name Pike County High School!”At halftime, the PCHS cheerleaders would cross the field, take the visiting team’s cheerleads by their hands and take them to the Brundidge side for Cokes and chips.Outlaw said the halftime show was always a thriller. The band from each school would take the field, in turn.“Our band would turn to our side and form the letter ‘B’ and play a march and a patriotic song,” Outlaw said. “Then, they would go over and play for the other team’s fans and their band would do the same thing. Nowadays, the bands just play to the home side. To me, that seems kind of impolite. But we wanted to be nice to the visiting team even if we wanted to beat the fire out of them.” By Jaine Treadwell Skip By Secrets Revealed Email the author Outlaw said the best part of the football game was when the final seconds ticked off the clock.“The cheerleaders got to run out in the middle of the field and hug the football players,” Outlaw said, laughing. “It didn’t matter if we won or lost, we still hugged the football players. If Brundidge lost, some of the players would be so mad they would fuss and kick but most of us just hugged.”After the football game, the cheerleaders would be in charge of the dance in the auditorium. As the head cheerleader, Outlaw’s responsibility was to get the records to be played. That meant going around the neighborhood and borrowing records.“All of the girls were crazy about Elvis Presley,” Outlaw said. “Anything he sang we liked. And, we liked Fats Domino and The Supremes, the Coasters and Little Richard. Some of the boys liked to dance but most of them just stood around.“But those of us that danced, danced up a storm,” Outlaw said. “We did the Bop and the Twist and some rock ’n roll stuff. We ever waltzed. We did.”For Outlaw and others who experienced high school football in the 1950s, those Friday nights are deeply engrained in their memories. And, Outlaw said it would be fun to once again put on her letter sweater and her purple wool skirt and lead the fight song at her alma mater, Pike County High School. You Might Like Pet contest deadline extended Good news was circulated Wednesday that will be of great interest to pet owners. The entry deadline for the Humane… read more Outlaw said Pike County’s favorite cheer was “Two bits! Four bits! Six bits a dollar. All for Pike County stand up and holler.”“Everybody would stand up and holler as loud as they could and folks could hear us all the way to the Tarentum,” Outlaw said, laughing. “We had a fight song and everybody knew all the words – grownups and little children, too. I don’t know if high schools have fight songs anymore, but they should.”Even after “all these years,” Outlaw remembers the Pike County High School Fight Song. Sponsored Content This Video Will Soon Be Banned. Watch Before It’s… Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthTop 4 Methods to Get Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel Print Article Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Plans underway for historic Pike County celebrationlast_img read more

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first_img Smiley spoke almost directly to the university students but his message was not just for them.“I don’t have a speech,” Smiley said. “I’ll be all over the place but I hope you’ll get something from what I have to say.”Smiley grew up in the Kingston Projects in Birmingham, “Section 8.” He was the product of a single parent home. The projects were ripe with drugs, gangs and violence.“There were a lot of temptations out there,” he said. “I had decisions to make – whether to join a gang, to do drugs, drink, smoke. To do what others were doing. But I stayed on the porch.” “When you are 18 years old, you can make decisions that will affect the rest of your life,” he said. “When I got on a bus in Birmingham to go to college in Tuskegee, my uncle told me, ‘Don’t leave with nothing and come back with nothing.’ By The Penny Hoarder Sponsored Content Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson Email the author Published 3:00 am Saturday, February 4, 2017 Latest Stories Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthTop 4 Methods to Get Fortnite SkinsTCGThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancel “Out of the bus window, I saw my grandmother crying. I knew I wasn’t coming back with nothing. I was going to make her proud.“And, somebody made sacrifices so you could have what you have. But nobody has to do anything for you. You can do for yourself. Be prepared. Know how to meet people. Know how to hold a knife and fork; know about etiquette. When others fly low, you fly high.”Smiley said he demands that his children fly high. “When we had dinner with President Obama, my daughter was confortable because she knew how to hold a knife and fork,” he said. “Preparation meets opportunity.”Smiley challenged his audience to take advantage of every opportunity and to be extraordinary.“The difference between ordinary and extraordinary is extra,” he said. “When you are serious about what you do, nobody has to tell you want to do. Go to work 30 minutes early and stay late. Sometimes you have to suck it up and go to work when you don’t feel like it. You’ll be tested. Suck it up. Work through adversity. Don’t get an attitude. Take your job and life seriously. Somebody made sacrifices so you can be where you are and have what you have. Always remember that.”The Leadership Conference will continue today at the Trojan Center. Bishop James L. Davis will be the keynote speaker at the closing luncheon. Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits Skip Book Nook to reopen “All blood flows red,” Hawkins said. “There is no distinction among those who serve.”As a prelude the opening address by Rickey Smiley, radio personality, television host, actor, stand-up comedian, Hawkins reminded the attendees “laughter is the best medicine.”If laughter is a good medicine, the audience got a big dose and also a big dose of humility. Plans underway for historic Pike County celebration Smiley kicks off leadership conference The Penny Hoarder Issues “Urgent” Alert: 6 Companies… Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Comedian Rickey Smiley kicked off the 16th Annual Leadership Conference Friday night on the campus of Troy University.The 16th Annual Leadership Conference opened Friday night at Sartain Hall on the campus of Troy University in celebration of Black History Month.Troy University Chancellor Dr. Jack Hawkins, Jr. welcomed the conference attendees and challenged them to leave the conference with renewed determination to make a difference in their communities.Hawkins recognized the veterans in attendance and expressed appreciation for their service and sacrifices. He paid homage to the African Americans who have answered the country’s call from, the American Revolution to Afghanistan. By Jaine Treadwell Print Article You Might Like Troy Regional unveils chapel renovation A renovation recognition program was held at the Troy Regional Medical Center Chapel Thursday morning and the chapel was filled… read morelast_img read more

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first_imgMattGush/iStock(LAKEWOOD, Colo.) — A semi driver is facing homicide charges Friday after multiple people were killed in a fiery crash involving 28 vehicles on a Colorado highway. Officials did not specify the number of people killed, but said multiple died Thursday on Interstate 70 in Lakewood, about 8 miles west of Denver. Six people were taken to hospitals in unknown conditions, officials said Friday. There is no indication this was an intentional act, officials said.The accident occurred Thursday about 4:30 p.m. when a semitrailer traveling at a high rate of speed slammed into several stopped cars during a traffic jam, police said. Four semis and 24 cars were involved in the crash, officials said Friday. Joshua McCutchen told ABC News’ Good Morning America he noticed a semi barreling down the emergency lane before he saw fire, smoke and explosions. “I’ve never seen that many cars and that much destruction and fire,” he said. “It was just complete chaos.”The driver of one of the semis is being charged with multiple counts of vehicular homicide. The driver, who has not been identified, was not seriously injured, officials said. There’s no evidence of drugs or alcohol, officials said.Lakewood Police Department agent Ty Countryman said the accident could end up being one of the worst in the city’s history. “It is true carnage there as far as the debris, what’s left of cars and trucks, along with the cargoes that were in the semis,” Countryman said. Brian Dickey, who was caught up in the accident, told Denver ABC affiliate KMGH-TV that the back of his truck “lifted up and shoved me forward.”“I was hitting other cars. When I came to a stop, I look in my rear view mirror and all I saw was a bunch of flames” he said. “And I jumped out of the vehicle as fast as I could. There was so much fire at the time that I couldn’t even really approach any of the other vehicles to see if there was any other survivors or what.”McCutchen said he saw a man, who had been holding a cardboard sign, asking for money, rush to the scene and pull people out of the fiery wreckage. “He’s definitely a hero — he saved four people’s lives,” McCutchen said. Investigators say they are looking at social video from the scene that captured footage of a semi speeding past stopped cars just seconds before the collision.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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