June 13, 2021
  • 5:51 am Turkmenistan : RFE/RL reporter hounded for snapping supermarket line
  • 5:45 am Indian reporters attacked by local BJP leaders at meeting
  • 5:42 am New UN resolution on safety of journalists
  • 5:41 am Kurdish-born Austrian jailed for 18 months for online “defamation”
  • 5:39 am Director of HornAfrik radio murdered in Mogadishu

first_img Mass international solidarity campaign launched in support of Maria Ressa March 6, 2012 – Updated on January 20, 2016 Suspect identified in shooting attack on journalist Help by sharing this information News May 3, 2021 Find out more News Reporters Without Borders welcomes the progress that the police have made in the investigation into the shooting attack on radio presenter Fernando Gabio on 2 March in Iloilo City, as it shows they are taking the case seriously. We encourage them to continue.According to Iloilo News Today (iloilonewstoday.com), Iloilo City police chief Marietto Valerio announced on 5 March that a suspect has been identified from photos. The identification was made by Gabio’s two nephews, who were at his home at the time of the attack.After receiving telephone threats, Gabio had asked his nephews to accompany him at all times and they had noticed during the weeks prior to the shooting that he was followed on several occasions by two men on a motorcycle who were dressed in black jackets and wearing helmets.On the basis of their description of the two men and the motorcycle, the police showed them photographs of known or suspected criminals and they identified one, the alleged leader of a local criminal gang.__________03-03-2012 Radio host narrowly escapes murder attemptReporters Without Borders condemns today’s attempted murder of Radio Mindanao Network presenter Fernando “Kapid” Gabio, who came under fire from two men on a motorcycle while outside his home in Iloilo City on the central island of Panay.“The shooting attack on Gabio is the latest in a long line of attacks and threats on journalists and is part of a general climate of violence for media personnel,” Reporters Without Borders said. “We remind the authorities of their duty to conduct effective investigations into these acts of violence and to have the courage to explore the possible links with organized crime and politicians. They must end the situation of impunity that has prevailed for too many years in the Philippines.”Gabio was washing his car outside his home at 7 a.m. when two men on a motorcycle fired three shots at him before making off, using a method often employed for contract killings. He was taken to Iloilo Mission Hospital with a gunshot injury to the leg that is not life-threatening.Aged 62, Gabio works for radio DYRI, which is part of the Radio Mindanao Network (RMN), hosting a programme called “Mr. Expose” in which he exposes alleged corruption cases. He has also hosted a political programme during election periods. He recently received anonymous telephone threats.Gabio is far from being the first journalist to be injured or killed in a targeted attack in the Philippines. Fellow DYRI-RMN presenter Niel Jimena was gunned down by two men on a motorcycle on 22 August 2011, after receiving threats. The police said they did not rule out the possibility of a link between the attempt on Gabio’s life and Jimena’s murder six months ago.According to the National Union of Journalists of the Philippines, a total of 150 journalists have been killed since the return to democracy in 1986. Paramilitary groups and private militias were to blame for many of these deaths.Nearly two years after the Maguindanao massacre, in which 32 journalists died, the media freedom situation is deteriorating dangerously in the Philippines, which is ranked 140th out of 179 countries in the 2011-2012 Reporters Without Borders press freedom index. PhilippinesAsia – Pacific RSF_en News PhilippinesAsia – Pacific center_img News Follow the news on Philippines February 16, 2021 Find out more Organisation June 1, 2021 Find out more Philippines: RSF and the #HoldTheLine Coalition welcome reprieve for Maria Ressa, demand all other charges and cases be dropped Receive email alerts Filipina journalist still held although court dismissed case eleven days ago to go furtherlast_img read more

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first_imgHIT plays from 23 year-old out of work actors are scarcer than pink diamonds but since Stefanie Preissner delivered ‘Solpadeine is my Boyfriend’ to the world, well, the world just can’t get enough.She acts alone in this short (60-minute) play set in the milieu of disenfranchised twenty-somethings. Reared in the boom years of expectations, earnings, credit and spend, they now find themselves at sea like flotsam, if not already overseas looking for work.It’s a dark comedy that sold out when premiered at the Dublin based 2012 Absolut Fringe theatre festival. ‘Solpadeine is my Boyfriend’, directed by Gina Moxley and produced by With an ‘F’ Productions, was nominated for two awards.“No, I did not expect that much success when I wrote it,” Preissner admits. “So much work goes into writing a play that it is great to get life out of it and two years is just great.”Success is all the more surprising as this creative stopped writing for five years after her début work ‘Our Father’, again with an autobiographical element, failed: “It was gloriously awful, overly sentimental.”Preissner continued training and working as an actor and had proper expectations – “drama school can give one a false sense of worth” – but reality and the crash bit.She explains the appeal of ‘Solpadeine is my Boyfriend’, downloaded in countries everywhere from the RTE podcast, as “people really connecting with it. It’s hard to know the demographic of each audience but people from aged 13 to 90 have seen the play”.The play is built on the poles of depression, immigration and addiction, following the journey of a girl from Cork to Dublin in search of work and love.At Lime Tree Theatre, Thursday November 21 only, at 8pm. Previous articleWorst ghost estates to be bulldozedNext articleSpeak Up on Services Guest Writerhttp://www.limerickpost.ie LifestyleArtsNewsSolpadeine is my boyfriendBy Guest Writer – November 19, 2013 568 Facebook Email Twitter Limerick Post Show | PlayAct Drama School TAGSdramatheatre Linkedin Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? Rehearsed Reading by Bottom Dog Theatre Company center_img Advertisement The Secrets of Primrose Square – Virtual tour dates announced Lasta: a National Arts Programme casting call for young Limerick people WhatsApp Print RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Belltable:Connect invites applications for Translating Live to Online Workshops this Autumn Belltable:Connect bursary to help artists explore a new idea in Maylast_img read more

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first_img Pinterest Pinterest Cllr Jack MurrayCars have been broken into in Burnfoot, with a number of items taken, including a mobile phone.Local councillor Jack Murray says he knows of at least two incidents in Fairview and Pairc an Grianan, and believes there could have have been more.In both instances, the cars were unlocked, and Cllr Murray says its a timely reminder to people always to lock their cars.Coincidentally, he says that’s a message that was being stressed by the new Superintendent in Buncrana at a function last night………[podcast]http://www.highlandradio.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/11/murraycarbreakins.mp3[/podcast] Gardai continue to investigate Kilmacrennan fire Google+ Google+ 75 positive cases of Covid confirmed in North Twitter Main Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Tuesday May 25th 365 additional cases of Covid-19 in Republic Facebook Newscenter_img Man arrested on suspicion of drugs and criminal property offences in Derry WhatsApp Twitter By News Highland – November 26, 2013 RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Previous articleOllie Horgan new Harps ManagerNext articleTwo teenagers attacked and robbed by gang weilding batons in Letterkenny News Highland WhatsApp Motorists warned to lock their cars after Burnfoot break-ins Further drop in people receiving PUP in Donegal Facebooklast_img read more

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first_imgNews UpdatesLockdown: Advocates’ Association Of Bengaluru Writes To DGP Seeking Permission For Advocates To Commute To & Fro Their Offices [Read Letter] LIVELAW NEWS NETWORK16 April 2020 9:01 AMShare This – xThe Advocates’ Association, Bengalauru has written to the Director General of Police, Karnataka urging him to permit Advocates to travel to their respective offices in view of the exemption granted to self-employed persons under the lockdown guidelines. The letter points out that under the relaxed guidelines issued by the Ministry of Home Affairs, select additional activities…Your free access to Live Law has expiredTo read the article, get a premium account.Your Subscription Supports Independent JournalismSubscription starts from ₹ 599+GST (For 6 Months)View PlansPremium account gives you:Unlimited access to Live Law Archives, Weekly/Monthly Digest, Exclusive Notifications, Comments.Reading experience of Ad Free Version, Petition Copies, Judgement/Order Copies.Subscribe NowAlready a subscriber?LoginThe Advocates’ Association, Bengalauru has written to the Director General of Police, Karnataka urging him to permit Advocates to travel to their respective offices in view of the exemption granted to self-employed persons under the lockdown guidelines. The letter points out that under the relaxed guidelines issued by the Ministry of Home Affairs, select additional activities will be allowed w.e.f. April 20, 2020. These include activities carried out by “Self Employed Persons” such as electricians, IT repairs, plumbers, motor mechanics, carpenters. National Lockdown : MHA Issues Revised Guidelines; Lists Out Activities Permitted After April 20 [Read Guidelines] The Association has urged that this list is merely “illustrative” and thus lawyers, who are self employed, must be granted permission to travel to their offices. “It is very categorical that services provided by self employed persons are permitted to operate and as an example few services are stipulated. Examples are illustrative and never exhaustive. Advocates are self employed and therefore fall within the category which is allowed to operate,” the letter states. In view thereof the Association has requested the DGP to direct the police personnel to permit the Advocates to travel, at the strength of their Bar Council issued ID cards. “Kindly issue necessary written instructions to the police personnel to permit Advocates/ Lawyers to travel to their respective office in verification of their identity card issued by the Advocates Associations and Karnataka State Bar Council, be treated as sufficient for the purpose of identification and oblige,” the Association wrote. States/UTs Cannot Dilute Restrictions Under COVID-19 Lockdown Guidelines : Home Ministry Earlier today, the Delhi Bar Association had also addressed a similar letter to the Delhi CM, urging him to permit Advocates to commute from their residence to their offices, while strictly following prescribed norms of social distancing. Read Letter Subscribe to LiveLaw, enjoy Ad free version and other unlimited features, just INR 599 Click here to Subscribe. All payment options available.loading….Next Storylast_img read more

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first_imgHomepage BannerNews Facebook WhatsApp Facebook DL Debate – 24/05/21 Twitter Pinterest News, Sport and Obituaries on Monday May 24th RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR WhatsApp Google+ An additional 47 Covid related deaths have been reported this evening – the highest figure in three weeks.A further 631 cases of the virus have also been confirmed, 23 of them in Donegal.370 people with Covid-19 are currently in hospital, 92 of them in ICU.center_img Twitter Previous articleArrests made in Derry today as part of investigation into dissident republican activityNext articleNPHET to discuss easing of nursing home visiting restrictions News Highland By News Highland – March 10, 2021 Google+ Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic 47 Covid related deaths and 631 cases confirmed, 23 in Donegal Pinterest Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programmelast_img read more

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first_imgHomepage BannerNews WhatsApp Loganair’s new Derry – Liverpool air service takes off from CODA Twitter Twitter The Daniel O’Donnell visitor centre in Dungloe has closed.In a statement issued today, owners Pat and Anne Gallagher say it is with regret that they announce the closure of the centre dedicated to one of Ireland’s most famous singers.They say the premises of the Stepping Stone and Bank Bistro, located in the towns Main Street has been sold with vacant possession.The Gallagher’s paid tribute to Daniel and Majella O’Donnell for allowing them the opportunity to showcase their special moments.Daniel O’Donnell himself has thanked Pat and Anne and everyone who helped in the Visitor Centre and says he is grateful so many people were afforded the opportunity to view the memorabilia gathered over the years. Facebook RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Daniel O’Donnell Visitor Centre in Dungloe closes Community Enhancement Programme open for applications Pinterest Arranmore progress and potential flagged as population grows center_img Previous articleMain Evening News, Sport and Obituaries Monday April 29thNext articleCork City 1 -1 Finn Harps: FT Report News Highland Google+ By News Highland – April 29, 2019 Important message for people attending LUH’s INR clinic Nine til Noon Show – Listen back to Monday’s Programme Facebook Pinterest Google+ WhatsApp Publicans in Republic watching closely as North reopens furtherlast_img read more

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first_imgSkip You Might Like Two Troy students arrested after video shows apparent gang rape during spring break Delonte Maristee, 22, of Bainbridge, Ga., and Ryan Austin Calhoun, 23, of Mobile, were arrested in Troy on Friday and… read more “And, he would have been humbled,” said his widow Faye Locklar. “Rex didn’t like a lot of attention but he would be glad to know that bluegrass music is still alive around here.”A large crowd of Locklar’s family members and friends gathered at noon Friday for the unveiling of the sign that now designates the Henderson highway between Glenwood and Springhill as the “Rex Locklar Memorial Bluegrass Highway.”Storm clouds rolled as the crowd gathered for the ceremony but someone said aloud what, perhaps, others were thinking, “Rex is up in heaven and he’s holding the rain off.” Email the author Bluegrass music could be heard on the Springhill “exit” of the Henderson highway around noon as people gathered for the unveiling of the sign at would designate the highway as the Rex Locklar Memorial Bluegrass Highway. Brandon Bostic, Mark Carter, Bobby Jackson and Ben Hughes were among the pickers. Pike County Sheriff’s Office offering community child ID kits MUSICAL MEMORY LANE: Rex Locklar Memorial Highway christened Print Article Published 4:00 am Saturday, April 11, 2015 Troy falls to No. 13 Clemson By Blood Sugar Blaster Plans underway for historic Pike County celebrationcenter_img Rex Locklar would have been proud. Md: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch) For 44 years, Rex Locklar was known as “Mr. Bluegrass’ around these parts and beyond.Each year, he hosted Rex’s Bluegrass Festival at the Henderson Music Park in the blink-and-miss-it community.The old Henderson Schoolhouse provided an indoor facility for the biennial pickin’ and grinnin’s for many years. When the schoolhouse began to fall in, the pickers and grinners simply moved outside.“Nothing was going to stop the music,” said Shelby Cargile. “We kept coming to Henderson because we loved Ol’ Rex and we loved bluegrass music.” When Locklar died in February 2014, the music did stop for a while. But, then, out of love for Rex Locklar, his friends, Cargile, Pete Austin and Bobby Jackson wanted to find a way to keep Locklar’s memory and his music alive.They approached Locklar’s brother, Wiley Locklar, and he talked with Pike County Commissioner Joey Jackson District 6 about the idea of naming the Henderson highway in memory of his brother. The idea took off.“I was all for it,” Jackson told those who gathered for the unveiling of the road sign. “I don’t know of anybody that didn’t love Ol’ Rex. Commissioner Ray Goodson and I share this road and Ray liked the idea. We started asking people on the road what they thought and they all said, ‘Yeah. It ought to be named for Ol’ Rex.’ We got a petition out and a whole lot of folks signed it. We presented it to the other commissioners and the vote was unanimous in favor or naming the road for Rex.”Austin said the mission for the sign is as a reminder of Locklar and the music he loved so much and of all that he gave to the community over those many years.Alan Boothe, a longtime friend of Ol’ Rex, said Locklar will continue to be missed by many.“Rex was a dear friend and he had a lot of wisdom in his head,” Boothe said. “I enjoyed sitting at the store and talking with him. I liked to hear his interpretations of the times. I was blessed to know him as so many were. The naming of this highway is a fitting memorial to him.” Book Nook to reopen Latest Stories By Jaine Treadwell Sponsored Content Remember America’s heroes on Memorial Day Around the WebMd: Do This Immediately if You Have Diabetes (Watch)Blood Sugar BlasterIf You Have Ringing Ears Do This Immediately (Ends Tinnitus)Healthier LivingHave an Enlarged Prostate? Urologist Reveals: Do This Immediately (Watch)Healthier LivingWomen Only: Stretch This Muscle to Stop Bladder Leakage (Watch)Healthier LivingRemoving Moles & Skin Tags Has Never Been This EasyEssential HealthRemember Them? I’m Sure Their New Net Worth Will Leave You SpeechlessbradofoThe content you see here is paid for by the advertiser or content provider whose link you click on, and is recommended to you by Revcontent. As the leading platform for native advertising and content recommendation, Revcontent uses interest based targeting to select content that we think will be of particular interest to you. We encourage you to view your opt out options in Revcontent’s Privacy PolicyWant your content to appear on sites like this?Increase Your Engagement Now!Want to report this publisher’s content as misinformation?Submit a ReportGot it, thanks!Remove Content Link?Please choose a reason below:Fake NewsMisleadingNot InterestedOffensiveRepetitiveSubmitCancellast_img read more

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first_imgABC News (LOS ANGELES) — The suspected “Golden State Killer,” believed to have committed 12 murders, at least 50 rapes and multiple home burglaries in the 1970s and 1980s, is now behind bars. The sudden arrest of 72-year-old Joseph James DeAngelo this week has shocked some of his victims and their family members, bringing their decades-old emotions back to the surface.DeAngelo, a former police officer, was taken into custody on Tuesday at his home in Sacramento County, the same county where his alleged crime spree began in 1976. The crimes continued across the state until 1986.His alleged “reign of terror” spanned from the Sacramento area in Northern California down to Orange County in Southern California, Orange County District Attorney Tony Rackauckas said at a news conference Wednesday.Bruce Harrington, whose brother and sister-in-law were alleged victims of the “Golden State Killer” in 1980, said at the news conference: “[To the] ladies who were brutally raped in these crime scenes, sleep better tonight. He isn’t coming through the window. He’s now in jail and he’s history.”Here’s a closer look at some of the victims.In 1976, Jane Carson-Sandler was cuddling with her 3-year-old son in Citrus Heights, California, when a man with a butcher knife broke into her home and tied them up.In 1977, 13-year-old Margaret Wardlow became the youngest victim of the “Golden State Killer” when she was tied up in her Sacramento home and raped, according to ABC affiliate KGTV in San Diego.The attacker tied up Wardlow’s mother and stacked plates on top of her so he would hear if she moved, KGTV said.Wardlow, who had read articles about the “Golden State Killer,” thought he seemed to thrive on his victims being powerless, KGTV said. So when he said to her, “Do you want to die? Do you want me to kill your mother?” Wardlow said she responded, “I don’t care,” which she thinks saved her life, reported KGTV.“Certainly I’m a victim. I was 13 years old, a man came into my home, tied up my mother and raped me. But I don’t own that,” Wardlow told KGTV. “I can choose whether I own that or not, and I don’t own it.”Wardlow said she will go to court appearances for the suspected “Golden State Killer,” and said she wants to look him in the eyes and ask, “Why?”Later, the crimes escalated to murder.Brian and Katie Maggiore were the first murders victims of the “Golden State Killer.” In February 1978, they were shot and killed while walking their dog in the Sacramento area.Brian Maggiore was a 21-year-old sergeant in the Air Force and his wife, Katie Maggiore, was 20, according to The Mercury News.Their deaths also marked the “Golden State Killer”‘s final attack in the Sacramento County Sheriff’s Department’s jurisdiction, according to The Sacramento Bee.Another couple killed by the “Golden State Killer” was Lyman Smith, 43, and his wife, Charlene Smith, 33.In 1980, they were killed in their Ventura, California, home. Charlene Smith was bound and sexually assaulted, The Ventura County Star reported.“They were bludgeoned to death with a log that was from a stack of firewood they had outside their home,” Lyman Smith’s daughter, Jennifer Carole, told ABC station KGO in San Francisco.Charlene Smith had been an interior decorator and Lyman Smith was on the short list for an appointment to the Superior Court bench, the Ventura County Star reported.“I never in my lifetime expected to see [an arrest],” Carole told KGO.Janelle Cruz, 18, believed to be the final victim of the “Golden State Killer,” was raped and murdered in 1986 in Irvine, California.Janelle Cruz was a “free spirit,” with a “big heart,” her sister, Michelle Cruz, said on “Good Morning America.”“She was the type of person that would stand up for you,” Michelle Cruz said. “She was sort of my backbone.”But after she died, the family left Irvine and never returned, Michelle Cruz told ABC News on Wednesday.Her sister’s murder “completely changed my world, my life, my identity,” Michelle Cruz said.“I kind of lived in sort of a bubble” for the first 20 years, Michelle Cruz said. “I never really talked about the case.”But she started talking about her sister’s death more about eight years ago, she said, “hoping to spread awareness and solve the case.”She was always worried about her own safety, never staying home alone and barricading her windows and doors.“I won’t have to research this case for hours every day and miss out on my children and my family,” she said. “I can finally breathe again.”Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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first_imgWhat makes the essential difference to a CEO in times of trouble? Threewell-known companies which worked closely with their top HR executives toensure the development of future leaders tell their story. Pepi Sappal reportsTo deliver Cadbury Schweppes’ tough financial targets, CEO John Sunderlandneeds the right leaders at the helm. He works with global resourcing directorNorma Boultwood to chase tomorrow’s high-fliers When John Sunderland was appointed CEO of Cadbury Schweppes last year,shareholders were not happy. “Our earnings per share, and more importantlyour return to shareholders, had been sluggish for many years. So things had tochange,” says Sunderland. His vision is to continue to grow the beverage and confectionery businessglobally to beat rivals like Coca-Cola and Mars. “We’ve set some verytough goals – to grow earnings every year by 10 per cent and double shareholdervalue every four years,” Sunderland says. In order to achieve these goals he needs the right leaders at the helm ofthe organisation. “Our business will succeed or fail by the quality of ourpeople at all levels. Given that premise, there’s no doubt that people matterssuch as recruitment are a board responsibility. Yet it’s always been a greatsurprise to me why HR isn’t represented on more boards. At Cadbury Schweppes,HR has been on the board for almost 20 years,” he says. Sunderland takes a personal interest in HR matters, working closely withglobal resourcing director Norma Boultwood to make sure that the rightcandidates are being recruited, developed and persuaded to pursue their careersat Cadbury Schweppes. “We fill 85 per cent of our senior posts from within theorganisation,” says Sunderland. “But to make it to the top at thisfirm, you have to put in the years.” He and Boultwood did. It took Sunderland almost 28 years to make it to CEO.And Boultwood started her HR career back in 1980 as a personnel trainee. “Developing leadership at Cadbury Schweppes is almost a 30-yearproject,” says Sunderland. “Our strategy is to recruit them young,ideally straight out of university because the consequences of getting it wrongare low.” So what qualities does he look for? “Vision – people who canintuitively understand the future and have the ability to take people withthem,” Sunderland responds immediately. “But those types of traitsare harder to spot in young recruits. So we look for basic leadership qualitiessuch as energy, drive and a will to succeed. If people have these basics inabundance then we are halfway there.” Those were the qualities he was looking for when he attended AIESEC’sDeveloping Leaders Day in late August this year in Lenk, Switzerland “It’sa very efficient way of tapping into the best international graduatepopulation. This group does more than enjoy university,” says Sunderland.”The 30,000 members of AIESEC have a global perspective – that’s what setsthem apart from national university recruits.” The drawback is that this group is far more difficult to seduce, he claims.As these graduates have far more opportunities than before, joining amultinational corporation is no longer their priority. “Far more havetheir sights set on joining a not-for-profit organisation or the governmentsector so that they can make a difference and contribute to society.” So Sunderland is cleverly luring this talent by saying you can achieve thesegoals by joining us too. “Cadbury Schweppes has been criticised foroperating in South Africa, during Apartheid, and China – a country oftenaccused of having the worst human rights record. But I genuinely believe we cando far more to influence the way those societies develop from the inside thanthe outside. By setting a good role model of how we treat and deal with peoplein those countries, we can – in a small way – make our voice heard.” Many of AIESEC’s graduates have shown interest in the company’s globalexchange programme. Global resourcing director Norma Boultwood explains,”It’s a scheme where, say, a Chinese graduate will spend a year at ourAustralian office, and the Australian graduate in China. Both return home atthe end of the year and if things work out, they are recruited in their homecountries. We have similar arrangements between the US and UK, US and Mexico,and Argentina and Canada.” But that’s just the first hurdle. “We then have to train, develop andgroom these people into leaders through our internal programme which movesmanagers around internationally and cross-functionally,” says Boultwood. Sunderland is also actively involved in developing staff. “We are inthe process of developing a sales and marketing academy. And John [the CEO]plans to spend a lot of time there tutoring. He’s also helping to devise themesfor the coursework,” adds Boultwood. But simply developing the right leaders is not going to be enough to achievethe type of results Sunderland has in mind. “As creation of shareholdervalue became Cadbury’s governing objective, he needed the buy-in of all our36,000 employees worldwide to agree to go on this journey with him, not justthe managers,” explains Boultwood. So Sunderland and his HR team pursued an idea devised in 1997, to help themdeliver the type of talent required to achieve that objective. “We call it Managing For Value (MFV),” says Boultwood. “Theconcept incorporates five values that were of most strategic priority for us,including raising financial performance, sharpening the culture, values-basedmanagement, leadership capability and rewards. “It basically meant a fundamental reorganisation of the business. Toshow our management we were serious about stretching our financial targets, weput them into the public domain very clearly,” says Sunderland. “But it’s no good just exhorting people to do better. We then had toprovide the tools to help them achieve these tough targets. We introducedvalues-based management to give our managers new ways to analyse the businessto understand where we were producing economic profits and where we werefailing, and then ensuring our resource allocation decisions were made inbacking the winners. “Having set the goals and provided the tools, we then had to ensure wehad the right team and that they were properly motivated and remunerated. Thenext phase was therefore a management audit in which, among other things, theleadership imperatives we sought from our management were defined. We assessedand changed our management team. We then launched a worldwide programme tosharpen the culture and engage all our employees in the MFV journey. “Finally, our rewards scheme also had to change to reflect economicprofit. So we developed new ways in which as many employees as possible canhave shares and a personal interest in the company,” says Sunderland. He was personally involved in delivering the Managing For Value programme tomore than 2,000 of his managers – confirming his mantra: “Running abusiness successfully is only 20 per cent about strategy but 80 per cent aboutpeople”, says Boultwood. “It was this statement that gave HR a fantastic platform. This wholeMFV had a great people component, which put HR at the top of the CEO’sagenda.” In this case, HR has certainly helped to deliver on the bottom line.”Our 2001 half-year results are ahead of expectations,” she adds.”Sales rose 26 per cent to £2.46bn, and pre-tax profits by 14 per cent to£351m compared to the same period last year.” And, although, it’s too early to tell whether shareholder return hasdoubled, the signs are promising. “Over the last four years, we haveachieved an 84 per cent increase in total share owner return at a time ofconsiderable stock market volatility,” confirms Boultwood. All of which isproof that HR value has a strong correlation to shareholder value. Pierre Hessler and Carolyn Nimmy of Cap Gemini Ernst & Young’s believegood leadership skills can only be acquired through intelligent followship The downturn in the IT and telecoms industries is certainly having aknock-on effect on consultancies. Management and IT consulting firm Cap GeminiErnst & Young is no exception. The group’s main activities – helping businesses implement growth strategiesand leverage technology in the new economy – have markedly slowed over the pastfew months after clients delayed or cancelled projects. Like most companies, ithas had its fair share of casualties this year – 2,700 out of its 60,000employees have been shed to date. However, group managing director Pierre Hessler, former CEO of Cap Gemini,is adamant that industry growth hasn’t declined – just slowed down. But demandfor good leadership skills within the firm at every level is higher than ever –especially if the firm is to fulfil its growth and financial targets for 2001,about 9bn Euros. Both he and Carolyn Nimmy, global director of people relationship managementat CGE&Y, are looking for leaders who are pioneers and innovators,spearheading change in every sector, continuously evolving and learning, whilepersonally guiding and mentoring others to take on new challenges. Butaccording to Hessler, such skills are in chronically short supply, and can onlybe acquired through “intelligent followship”. “It has nothing to do with sheep-like conformism or blind obedience,”stresses Hessler. “Junior members of organisations learn leadership skillsfirst hand even while following the example of others from the start. Butfollowship does not end with the first promotion, nor if one rises to themeteoric heights of CEO. It is a whole set of skills – from the ability tointerpret and translate vision into action, to listening and responding tofellow colleagues – without which, no-one can hope to become a goodleader.” Managing change is another crucial skill for future leaders. “There hasbeen more change throughout the economy in the past five years than in theprevious 50, and all the signs indicate that rapid change will continue, andeven accelerate. Knowing how to be an agent of change, how to ride change, how to make it happenand how to thrive from its consequences are essential skills for anyonestarting a career today.” But the inflexible few, unable to adapt their skills in a high-performanceculture are doomed to fail. “An awareness and insight into new technology,as opposed to specific technical know-how, is also an essential skill forwannabe leaders, since the entire structure of organisations and their marketsare now determined by the technologies available,” adds Hessler. Of course, such talent is extremely rare. “Yet the search for peoplewith these skills remains constant,” says Hessler. “Given that theonly money we make is by renting out our brain power, it is imperative we findthe best and develop them.” Both CEO Geoff Unwin and Hessler rely on Carolyn Nimmy and her HR team tofind these skills. In fact, last year, Unwin told globalhr that he personallyspends 60 per cent of his time dedicated to sourcing talent. “There’s certainly a stronger focus now on HR from the top to see how ourhuman assets match the current market conditions, and what we are doing toattract, retain and develop the talent required,” says Nimmy. “Andthe board is not just interested in the hard facts and figures but howproactive we are being. Both Pierre Hessler and Geoff Unwin want to know whereare our future leaders are and what’s being done to recruit the best. They arealso curious about how potential recruits feel towards our brand and what theirmotivations are for joining us.” Both had the opportunity to discover exactly that over the past two yearswhen they attended AIESEC’s Developing Leaders Day with Nimmy, last year inEdinburgh, and this year in Lenk, Switzerland (see box on page 27). Nimmy first got involved with AIESEC back in 1997, when she was quicklyinfected with the positive energy and entrepreneurial skills of thisorganisation. “We are actively involved with AIESEC as many of thesegraduates will end up working for a consultancy,” says Nimmy. “It’s agreat to opportunity to not only increase our brand awareness in more than 85countries, but expose our managers to future talent.” The case of SwissAir provides an insight into how hard the company fought tokeep its business airborne. The group’s CEO Mario Conti, who hails from afinancial background, and chief personnel officer Matthias Mîlloney firmlybelieve that the right leadership in the driving seat can help a company introuble The SwissAir Group had its fair share of problems over the past few months.Two changes of CEO, plus reported losses of SFr2.9bn (approximatley $1.7bn) for2000 – largely due to its fledgling airline operations. So CEO Mario Conti,formerly CFO of Nestlé, had enough to contend with when he took up his post inApril this year. globalhr learnt of his strategy to keep the company airborne in late August.Unfortunately the tragic events of 11 September in New York marked its eventualdemise. It plunged the group, along with other airline companies, into furthercrisis and ultimately led to the company filing for bankruptcy in earlyOctober. SwissAir’s story provides a fascinating insight into how both Conti andchief personnel officer Matthias Mîlloney struggled to turn the company’sfortunes around. They continued to fight until the events of 11 September forcedthem into bankruptcy, which is why we have decided to run the comments theymade at the time. Conti had been working closely with Mîlloney at the time to ensure thecompany’s survival. This shrewd operator knew he was unlikely to turn thefortunes of the company around without the buy-in of his staff. So one of thefirst things he did when he came on board was to invite Molloney onto theexecutive management board. “What’s unique about Mario Conti is that, unlike most CEOs with afinance background, he understands the value of HR,” said Mîlloney.”The fact that he’s from Nestlé – a company reputed for its HR bestpractices – probably explains a lot.” Conti may have only been eight months into his job but was getting to knowhis organisation’s strengths. “He is keen to find out what our skills baselooks like, and spends at least half a day a week at our offices and factoriesto find out more about our staff – what drives them, concerns them and soon,” said Molloney. He took a huge interest in HR matters – a fact which impressed Mîlloney.”In our regular one-to-one hourly meetings we often discuss specifictraining for managers. Other times we discuss management audits, to see whetherwe have allocated talent effectively for optimal performance,” he said. Making sure their leaders were in the right place at the right time wascritical, explained Mîlloney. “Leaders that can not only see through thetough times, but those with good international capabilities to grow and expandthe business internationally as our home market is extremely small. If we wantto grow successfully, we need 10 times the size of our market, and that meanscompeting for international clients,” he said at the time. But finding leaders with global skills and multicultural experience to growand respond to an international customer base is extremely difficult, saidMîlloney. “They need more than languages, but transnationalthinking.” So Conti and Mîlloney worked together on strategies to help find theseglobal leaders, and also develop and motivate them enough to stay. That’s whyboth attended AIESEC’s Developing Leaders Day with Cadbury Schweppes and CapGemini Ernst & Young. Mîlloney, who also sits on AIESEC’s board, believes the graduate members ofthis group have the global mindset they are looking for. Having been in the HRbusiness for approximately two decades, Mîlloney believes leadership issomething that no university can teach. “But leaders should have a licenceto lead,” he says. Perhaps in his dual role as practitioner and professorof HR, he’ll change that. However, as events have overtaken him, he now hasother things to keep him occupied. Tomorrow’s LeadersAccording to CEO John Sunderland, drive, judgement andinfluence are the characteristics which underpin successful leadership.”Leaders have to see the future, challenge the status quo, determine avision, to motivate the organisation to follow the pursuit and achievement ofthat vision. “That used to be all that leaders had to worry about, butthe world is changing. Business in the guise of what is called globalcapitalism is becoming deeply unpopular. As business continues to transcendnational boundaries and many corporations have valuations greater than many ofthe world’s countries GDPs, we face a new set of challenges,” explainsSunderland.The new generation of leaders will need to work much harder.”They’ll need to communicate the value and contribution business makes totoday’s world. At the same time they will need to ensure that theirorganisations are not just subscribing to, but are delivering on all thetenants of good corporate governance. Care for the environment and sustainabledevelopment, commitment to human rights and ethical trading, encouragement ofdiversity and active contribution to the communities and societies within whichthey operate,” he says.If he had to summarise leadership in four words he said itwould be “to make a difference”.AIESEC Leaders DayThis year, Cadbury Schweppes, Cap Gemini Ernst & Young andThe SwissAir Group supported AIESEC’s Developing Leaders Day 2001, in Lenk,Switzerland. The event gave the three companies the chance to meet and developleadership skills of about 500 graduates from 85 countries. Each companysupported the event by providing about 15 managers to help the studentsunderstand and develop leadership qualities. AIESEC is the world’s largest student-run organisation withabout 30,000 members from more than 800 universities worldwide. “Ourmission is tocontribute to the development of our countries and their peoplethrough an overriding commitment to international understanding andcooperation,” says Sahil Kaul, incoming president of AIESEC. “We hopeto produce more than 10,000 change agents by 2005.”According to outgoing president Jose Pablo Retana, “It’sthe perfect place to find those diverse leaders who will eventually replacemany of today’s Anglo-Saxon-dominated boards that tend to lack the key marketinsights necessary to capitalise on today’s global opportunities.” For more information go to: www.aiesec.org Comments are closed. From one leader to anotherOn 1 Nov 2001 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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first_img Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos. Electronic route to ethnic monitoringOn 22 Jan 2002 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. The introduction of an integrated electronic HR and payroll system at theRoyal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea will help the council fulfil itsresponsibilities under the Race Relations (Amendment) Act. The system, which is due to go live in April, will provide payroll servicesfor 6,000 staff, is being supplied by Northgate Information Solutions in a dealworth more than £1m. George Bishop, the council’s director of personnel and general services, isplanning to add recruitment and training packages, which he said will help thecouncil comply with the Commission for Racial Equality’s code of practice onthe Race Relations (Amendment) Act. Under the Act, local authorities have a legal duty to monitor the ethnicityof their workforce in job applications, grievance procedures, promotion andtraining. The integrated system, called ResourceLink, will also manage personalinformation data such as job details, sickness absence, holidays and grievanceprocedures. Bishop said the new system would integrate HR and payroll, providingsignificant efficiency and cost savings. “It is a modern integrated system which will allow us to inputinformation once rather than twice.” Bishop added it would also make managers more autonomous by giving themeasier access to staff information. The contract with Northgate will save the council more than £100,000 on itsexisting payroll contract. It includes managed services from Northgate’spayroll services team and managed solutions centre in Hemel Hempstead,Hertfordshire. www.rbkc.gov.uklast_img read more

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