April 9, 2021
  • 7:39 am Watch Members of Lettuce Join Vulfpeck For Late Night Jazz Fest Throwdown
  • 7:39 am The Disco Biscuits Share Full Videos Of Powerful Hometown Run At The Fillmore
  • 7:36 am The Claypool Lennon Delirium Transcends Universes At The Capitol Theatre
  • 7:35 am Phish Shows Off ‘California Love’ In Their Tour Closing Performance [Recap]
  • 7:31 am Hometeam New Years Rally To Enter 2017 With Music, Art, & Community In Florida

first_imgEach evening on the seventh floor of 10 Akron St. in Cambridge, Alena Yermalovich and her husband, Pavel Paromov, read to their young children before a stunning view of the Charles River and the Boston skyline.The couple moved into their Harvard University Housing (HUH) apartment nearly 10 years ago, when Yermalovich became a research assistant at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Their apartment is one of 3,000 units in Harvard Housing’s Graduate Commons Program (GCP), which is marking its 10th anniversary this fall.“When I applied to the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences Ph.D. program, one of the questions was, ‘Why do you want to be at Harvard?’ And the answer was easy: ‘Because I love my apartment,’” said Yermalovich, now a postdoctoral researcher in the Dana-Farber lab of Matthew Meyerson, Harvard Medical School. “We have watched the Graduate Commons program unfold since the beginning, and it just gets better and better.”The GCP’s innovative approach offers housing that brings together graduate students, faculty, staff, and their families, through integrative events and programming that fosters community. Its motto is “Live. Laugh. Learn.” Live-in faculty directors and resident community advisers work collaboratively with GCP staff to help ensure HUH residents have the opportunity to experience friendship, diversity, culture, and an exchange of multidisciplinary knowledge outside of the classroom.“We are from another country, we don’t have family here, but there is such a feeling of community, security, and opportunities for work-life balance, we cannot imagine our life without it,” said Yermalovich, who came to Massachusetts from Belarus in 2003. “The feeling here is that this is your home, and we feel welcome.”That was one of the goals for Lisa Valela, director of the GCP, who helped launch the Harvard Housing initiative in 2008. What began as a pilot program of 300 University apartments in two buildings near campus is now is a dynamic community accommodating 5,000 residents across 108 buildings in Cambridge, Somerville, and Boston.“One of the main components of Graduate Commons’ success over the past decade has been its ability to utilize residential common spaces to develop intentional programming mapping back to their four pillars: building community, bridging divides across cultures and disciplines, learning outside the classroom, and service to self and others,” Valela said.Hundreds of events each year provide enriching and sometimes life-changing social and intellectual opportunities for all residents, including spouses, partners, and children, she said.,Lecture series and dinner discussions; coffee, wine, and game nights; classes in subjects from cooking to fitness; outings to Boston sites; music and sporting events; apple picking; outdoor movie nights; and international holiday and cultural celebrations are just some of the events. Several HUH buildings also offer common spaces for residents, including playrooms, function rooms, community kitchens, patios, and study spaces.“It’s a basic human need to feel connected to people, and that’s where our strength lies. We are constantly providing different opportunities for people to connect, whether it’s an intellectual event or yoga class or coming down to watch ‘Monday Night Football,’” Valela said. “Imagine what happens at the intersection of life experience and disciplines and cultures, and what can happen when you put those people in the same place.”Sasan Jalili Firoozinezhad at the Wyss Institute for Biological Engineering is studying toward a Ph.D. in bioengineering. The native of Iran had lived in Switzerland and Portugal before coming to Cambridge in 2016.“The Graduate Commons Program is very unique in that this housing comes with social programs. When you settle into a community that helps you to feel at home, feel safe, and helps you to settle down, it makes a big difference,” he said. “I have been in many different countries and have never seen anything like this. It has played a great role in my life.”Firoozinezhad, who will graduate next year, said it is often difficult for an international student to feel comfortable in a new culture for the first time, one reason he enjoys being a resident community adviser at 5 Cowperthwaite St. This past spring, he held Nowruz — a Persian New Year celebration.“Not only do we have residents from different corners of the world, we also have the ability to get to know people from all over campus,” he said. “This was very important to me, to be in touch with different disciplines. The whole experience is quite unique.”Sharing expertise in the Harvard community is not unfamiliar to Maggie Gardner ’02, Harvard Law School ’07. During her time as a Climenko Fellow from 2013‒17, she and her husband, Jeff Holden, were community advisers at Botanic Gardens, and felt enriched by the scope of multidisciplinary interaction there.They recall when one of their neighbors suggested borrowing a telescope from the Harvard Center for Astrophysics and offered to volunteer his expertise so residents could get a different view of the night sky. Gardner and Holden arranged the event through the GCP and within minutes people came from all over to see the moon, Jupiter, and constellations.“It was out on the sidewalk and it was packed. Adults were excited, kids were in pajamas looking through this large telescope,” said Gardner, now an assistant professor of law at Cornell University. “As a community member, having those kinds of super-valuable experiences where you can get outside of your expertise is really good for developing ideas and letting off steam.”Holden, an information technology professional out of Ithaca, N.Y., said spouses of Harvard affiliates often are not primary in the process, coming to Cambridge without jobs or a long expected stay. For them, the GCP provides fantastic solutions.,“Maggie was our anchor into the community, but I got a lot out of it as a partner. You can drop in and get a bite to eat, or you can have something much deeper,” he said. “I made a lot of friends I wouldn’t have made otherwise, I felt supported, and this is really important.”Paromov agrees. Originally from Russia, he currently practices law in Suffolk County. He and Yermalovich are the playroom managers at 10 Akron St., a place where he can escape the seriousness of his work.“Managing the playroom doesn’t feel like work. We interact with other young families, and have made many friends from all over the world,” he said. “It’s a very good way to relax.”The couple actually started their family as GCP residents. Their daughter, Victoria, is now 4, and their son, Max, is 1. Because the family speak Russian at home, Yermalovich was worried that her children might feel intimidated, but instead found many other parents speaking in their native language.“Our children are the luckiest in the world,” she said. “The program ensures we don’t feel deprived of anything.”Maura Petty, the property manager of HUH’s Mount Auburn Group, said she approaches her job by remembering that each resident has a unique story. She does, too. Petty started as a summer employee at HUH while she was still in high school, working every summer until she graduated college, and became a permanent employee in 2002.“You can feel the passion of every member of the team, their genuine desire to meet residents, learn their stories, and offer support, it’s what sets the GCP apart,” she said. “They build community among the disciplines in a housing situation that could otherwise be very isolating for many folks.”Valela said the vision for the GCP is simple because it’s all about the people.“We get to meet amazing people — hard-working, inspirational people who just want to make a difference in the world,” she said, “And they can do that from right here, their Harvard home.”last_img read more

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first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Francesca Mccaffrey for Phys.org:A new study from MIT researchers shows that coal’s economic edge may soon be far thinner than we think. In a working paper for the MIT Energy Initiative, graduate students Joel Jean, David C. Borrelli, and Tony Wu show how replacing current coal-fired power plants with wind and solar photovoltaic generation facilities could provide benefits for the environment and for bottom lines in the near future.The online tool they’ve created to help illustrate this argument is CoalMap, a web application that compares the levelized cost of electricity (LCOE)—that is, the minimum electricity price a power plant must receive to break even on investment costs over its lifecycle—of existing U.S. coal-fired plants with the expected LCOE of potential new utility-scale solar and wind generation in the same locations. The tool draws on publicly available data sets from sources including the U.S. Energy Information Administration and the National Renewable Energy Laboratory.Users view CoalMap as a map of the continental United States showing the locations of current coal plants, with markers indicating each plant’s nameplate capacity and relative cost. As users apply different carbon prices, deployment subsidies, and rates of cost decline for solar and wind, they can observe the effects of these changes on the cost-competitiveness of renewable energy across the country.The results might be surprising to those arguing for coal’s inherent cheapness. If levelized costs continue to decline as solar and wind technology improves, both will catch up to coal in terms of cost-competitiveness in the coming decades. The effect is even more staggering if a carbon price is implemented. Indeed, as the authors write, “imposing a price on carbon would make new solar and wind facilities significantly more competitive with coal power, even without major cost reductions” due to technological improvement. In the event of both a carbon price and improvements in clean energy technology, the researchers say, nearly all aging coal-fired plants in the U.S. could be headed for retirement within the next two decades, displaced by cheap low-carbon energy generation, even without subsidies and in areas with poor solar and wind resource.Full item: Mapping coal’s decline and the renewables’ rise On the Blogs: MIT Research on the Rising Competitiveness of Renewableslast_img read more

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first_imgThere are few things that can compare to a good weekend on the slopes.  Getting outside all day long… carving turns, yard-saleing at high speeds, and cheering on your friends.  Then coming back to the condo to sit by the fire, enjoy a beverage or two, and recount the stories late into the evening as the snow piles up on the porch outside.I just returned from a trip up to Snowshoe, WV with a bunch of good people from Clemson University… my younger sister’s college posse and some other friends of friends.  Even though I had not met many of them, there is nothing quite like sharing an experience like that to forge friendships.  Our group was evenly split between skiers and snowboarders, and also ran the gamut of skill levels.  With 12 people in our crew, everyone had another person to ride with.I admittedly have been a bit skeptical of whether I could truly enjoy East Coast skiing again after taking a legendary trip out to Alta, Utah last spring, but Snowshoe pleasantly surprised me.  During our stay there, the 4,500 foot summit received over 8 inches of fresh powder!  In spite of our aching quads and the warmth of our beds, the whole group did a great job of getting up early and being on the mountain every day when the barriers dropped at 9:00 AM.The highlight of the trip for me was definitely being the first person down the 1.5 mile Western Territory the morning after the majority of the snow fell.  As soon as ski patrol took down the rope, we all took off racing for those fresh tracks.  I soon found myself with no one in front of me, feeling the flow of wide powder turns on an immaculate slope.  Unbelievable!A quick lunch at the condo was a daily regroup tradition, and everyone was back on the mountain again by 1:30 or 2:00.  The Snowshoe slopes proper closed at 4:30 every day, but the Silver Creek resort nearby stayed open until 9:00 PM, and was accessible with the same lift ticket… we did our best to collectively take advantage of all 12 hours of skiing each day!The final night of the trip was complete with a massive group celebration, and then a rally to the local bar/dance club, The Connection.  We were joined on the dance floor by a bunch of folks from all walks in life who share the same passion for snow, and everyone celebrated the best conditions of the year thus far.As school and work commitments began to loom again, our departure was no less exciting than the rest of our trip, with the snow drifts and icy roads getting two of the three cars in our caravan stuck!  Fortunately the strength of our group was able to push both vehicles out, and we drove home in an alternating state of afterglow and exhaustion.We picked the right weekend, and I can’t wait until next year!last_img read more

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first_img 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Nick Kerbeshian Nick spent his summer as a Data Intern at OnApproach and is currently a sophomore at Gustavus Adolphus College in Saint Peter, MN. He plans to major in Statistics and Economics. Web: https://www.onapproach.com Details Being a summer intern here at OnApproach, I’ve had a different view on data analytics. It’s more than just looking at numbers and seeing trends. To be successful in data analytics, it is very important to have a clear vision and understanding of the industry that you are working in. From working in the industries of sports and credit unions I’ve found a commonality between them. The main goal between the two industries is to make the best decisions for their fans (sports), and members (credit unions). For both industries to achieve that, they need data analytics.Money is not everything to most people, but it is possible that money is the most important asset that we need for our lives. The way you manage money will be a vital part of anyone’s life or business. I’ll take one of the biggest industries out there, sports, as an example. In recent years, the world of sports has experienced an explosion in the use of analytics. Every major sports team has a salary cap, an agreement or rule that places a limit on the amount of money that a team can spend on players’ salaries. General managers play a major role in the overall success of professional sports. For example, general managers for professional baseball teams are tasked with finding the right level of talent to better field, pitch, catch, hit, etc. for the betterment of their organization’s success. In the movie Moneyball, the goal is to answer objective questions about baseball using data. This relates to the technique of Sabermetrics, which is the application of statistical analysis to baseball records, especially to evaluate and compare performance of individual players. This would help track which player contributes the most to the team’s offense, pitching rotation, and even which infielder has the most range for fielding. The Moneyball method that Billy Beane, the General Manager of the Oakland Athletics, used was called on-base plus slugging (OPS). Bean used OPS to increase his team’s chances of scoring the most runs by signing players who could get on base. From this method he thought he could maximize runs, which would lead to maximized wins within the budget. Using this unbiased approach to signing players resulted in one of the longest win streaks in MLB history of 20 games. Credit unions should consider ways to utilize analytics to better serve their members even on budgets that are the lowest among financial institutions. The most important word I would use for sport teams and credit unions to look for in their fans/members is loyalty. The fans put a lot of time and money into their favorite sports teams by going to games, watching them on television, or by buying team merchandise and repping their brand out in the eyes of the public. Members at credit unions are very similar in two ways: 1) They put a lot of time into selecting the right credit union and 2) they trust that the credit union is a trustworthy source for handling all (or some) of their money (which typically involves a lot more money than sports for the average consumer). Analytics is very important to both industries. If everything runs smoothly, and it does make operations more efficient, then it benefits both parties involved. As time progresses, processes get more efficient and effective, and the same goes for the field of analytics. As you can see from these two very different industries, both see direct and indirect benefits from the use of data analytics. Active analytics allow credit unions to more effectively target customers, develop more personal relationships with members, and compete against larger banks. This trend will continue to grow and become more prominent as the business world continues to develop.last_img read more

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first_img“Like” Jacob Seus on Facebook and “Follow” him on Twitter. “We’re doing weddings and social events to keep us busy in the offseason,” said owner Eddie Bello. Bello told 12 News, the lights have done a lot to help keep his company up and running. Due to the coronavirus, business has been severely slowed down. “You just think of these seniors; they worked so hard and they don’t get to have those special memories of walking across and getting a diploma or prom or anything like that.” “This was a great way for us to get out into the community and help out a little bit.” “We saw a senior yesterday when we hung up lights, and she literally had tears in her eyes. Just a little something that her family can do to celebrate her accomplishment.” BINGHAMTON (WBNG) – Illuminations is a Christmas tree lighting company in the Southern Tier, but during the offseason they offer decorations for other occasions. They are surely something these seniors can look back on during a difficult time. “I didn’t expect to have twenty-seven thousand views and calls non stop throughout the day,” said Bello. To keep his business up and running, Eddie Bello and his team had to get creative. “Unfortunately, we lost every wedding that we had planned for this year and social events,” said Bello. “That’s what we feel like we’re doing right now is helping out the community, but it also helps get our name out there and let people know we are ready to hang some lights.” “This was originally thought to be high school, but college graduates are stepping up as well.” An idea that took off from the moment Bello put it on Facebook. The company has begun decorating the houses of seniors that missed out on graduation with the colors of their school. The lights are a celebration for any graduating senior.last_img read more

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first_img‘Trouble ahead’The US outbreak, once centered around densely populated New York City, has since infected communities from coast to coast. Experts believe that spread has been driven in part by summer vacation travel.”This is a predictor of trouble ahead,” Dr. Anthony Fauci, the nation’s top infectious diseases official, told CNN on Thursday.Fauci was speaking after the White House coronavirus task force coordinator, Dr. Deborah Birx, identified new areas of concern during a telephone call with state and local officials on Wednesday.Baltimore and Atlanta remain at a “very high level,” as well as Kansas City, Portland, Omaha and California’s Central Valley, Birx said on the call, a recording of which was obtained by the journalism nonprofit Center for Public Integrity.White House data shows small increases in the percentage of positive tests in Chicago, Boston, Detroit and Washington.On the positive side, medical professionals have a better understanding of what they are dealing with, said Dr. Khalilah Gates, a pulmonary and critical care specialist at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago.”We don’t know all of it, but it’s not the fear of the unknown anymore,” she told Reuters.Trump has urged state and local authorities to re-open public schools for in-person learning and Fauci has said children should be sent back to class as soon as possible.But many school districts nationwide, including two of the largest, Los Angeles and Chicago, have opted for online instruction.In rural Mississippi’s Corinth school district, where schools opened two weeks ago, five COVID-19 infections forced some students and teachers into quarantine, Superintendent Edward Lee Childress said on Facebook Live.The decision to reopen schools took into account the “inevitable moment” that COVID-19 would be detected and contact tracing plans triggered, Childress said.”We’re going to have some more positive cases. We know it will happen,” he said.Although the number of Americans seeking jobless benefits fell last week, a staggering 31.3 million people were receiving unemployment checks in mid-July. Other data on Thursday showed a 54% surge in job cuts announced by employers in July.The State Department on Thursday lifted an advisory from March that US citizens should avoid all international travel due to the pandemic. But American travelers are still restricted or banned in many parts of the world, including the European Union and Canada. Nearly 300,000 Americans could be dead from COVID-19 by Dec. 1, University of Washington health experts forecast on Thursday, although they said 70,000 lives could be saved if people were scrupulous about wearing masks.The prediction by the university’s widely cited Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation comes as top White House infectious disease advisors warned that major US cities could erupt as new hot spots if officials there were not vigilant with counter-measures.”We’re seeing a rollercoaster in the United States. It appears that people are wearing masks and socially distancing more frequently as infections increase, then after a while as infections drop, people let their guard down,” Dr. Christopher Murray, director of the IHME said in announcing the university’s latest forecast. Topics :center_img The US death toll stands at over 159,000, the most of any country in the world, with 4.8 million known cases. (Open https://tmsnrt.rs/2WTOZDR in an external browser for a Reuters interactive graphic)The IHME said infections were falling in former epicenters of Arizona, California, Florida, and Texas, but rising in Colorado, Idaho, Kansas, Kentucky, Mississippi, Missouri, Ohio, Oklahoma, Oregon, and Virginia. Those findings are consistent with Reuters tallies.Ohio Governor Mike DeWine, a Republican, on Thursday said he had tested positive for COVID-19 ahead of a planned meeting with President Donald Trump, but had experienced no symptoms of the illness.Tennessee and North Carolina reported record single-day increases in deaths on Thursday with 42 and 73, respectively.last_img read more

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first_img Equality,  National Issues,  Non-discrimination,  Press Release Harrisburg, PA – Department of Health Secretary Dr. Rachel Levine, Pennsylvania Commission on LGBTQ Affairs Executive Director Todd Snovel and members of the commission participated in the Rally for Trans Existence and Resistance at Love Park in Philadelphia this afternoon in support of transgender, non-binary and gender non-conforming individuals, decrying the abhorrent discriminatory policy proposed by the Trump Administration.“I am Rachel Levine; I am a parent; I am a doctor; I am a professor; I am Secretary of Health for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; and I am a transgender woman,” Sec. Levine said. “As an American woman, I have a right to equal protection under the law. Our governor believes this. He is the first Governor in the nation to create a Commission on LGBTQ Affairs.“In the Wolf Administration, we believe that no one should be denied health care, a job or housing because they are LGTBQ and Governor Tom Wolf will not jeopardize the health, safety or opportunities of any Pennsylvanian.“I have an important message today for anyone who is trans and struggling to live their truth openly: We are here to support you, to help you and protect you. We will not relent because we cannot put an entire generation at risk by denying them their rights.”The Pennsylvania Commission on LGBTQ Affairs, the first of its kind in the nation, offered this statement:“This past weekend, the New York Times reported on a memo from the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) which seeks to legally define gender as biological and determined at birth. If this proceeds it will have devastating impacts on the lives of our transgender and nonbinary communities nationwide. This policy further invalidates the lived experiences of well over 1 million individuals, across the country, and could restrict access to vital programs such as health care, housing, and other public services.“The Pennsylvania Commission on LGBTQ Affairs and the Wolf Administration are deeply disturbed by this proposed definition. We will continue to monitor this very closely and use our energies to prevent these discriminatory policies from being enacted. We refuse to let the lives of transgender and non-binary Pennsylvanians be erased.“Join us by showing your support. Utilize your social media platforms, contact your government officials, and engage in dialogues with other community members. We must unite and affirm the experiences and rights of our trans communities here in Pennsylvania and throughout our nation.” Wolf Administration Participates in Rally to Support Transgender Pennsylvanians, Decry Discriminatory Federal Policy October 23, 2018center_img SHARE Email Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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first_img“The information is published in the AP funds reports – for example, in the annual reports and on our websites,” they said.The funds said they shared the view that transparency and cost efficiency were crucial for any management.“The AP funds in general have among the lowest cost levels in the industry, even in an international comparison,” they said.They said the AP funds’ operations and the audit of these activities were partly regulated by law, and that external auditors reviewed their operations and accounts every year.They were critical of the ISF’s report and methods.“The ISF has neither been in contact with us regarding its perceived difficulties finding information nor has it had any contact with us to verify its ‘findings’ regarding the AP funds, when writing the report,” the funds said.They said the report contained a number of misunderstandings and failed to provide a correct presentation of how the AP fund system worked.AP funds 1-4 also said that, for a fund manager in general, and a global pension fund in particular, determining an appropriate cost level was a complex process. “Calculating costs in isolation gives an all too simplistic picture,” they said.The level of costs should form part of the broad canvas, instead of being seen as the primary criterion of valuation, they said. “This means adopting a holistic view, involving an assessment of revenue and risks, as well as costs,” they said.They said it was cost-efficiency that needed to be put in the spotlight but that this was not presented in the ISF report.Meanwhile, a spokesman for AP6 – the Swedish pensions buffer fund that invests exclusively in unlisted companies – said all costs regarding the fund’s asset management, among other things, were disclosed in its annual report and easy to follow year from year.“The owner, the Ministry of Finance, makes an audit of our financial activities each year, which is reported to the Swedish parliament,” he said.Separately, a spokesman for AP7, the default premium pension provider, said the pension fund was very transparent about its fees, as the current management fee could always be found on its website.The ISF report referred primarily to the transparency of the buffer funds, he said, which AP7 is not. Sweden’s AP pension buffer funds have refuted a finding in an official report that there was a lack of clarity in their administrative costs, insisting they are transparent in reporting returns, risks and costs.A report released at the end of last month by the Swedish Social Insurance Inspectorate (Inspektionen för socialförsäkringen or ISF) on administrative costs in the country’s pension system found that some of the administrative costs for the AP funds and the premium pension providers – for example, transaction costs and other fees associated with transactions – were difficult to estimate.In a joint reply to questions from IPE, AP funds 1-4 said: “We are transparent in our reporting concerning returns, risks and costs.”The four funds said they reported according to the IFRS standard and were transparent regarding expenses, including commission expenses. last_img read more

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first_img5 Planchonella Close, Edge Hill, is on the market for $2.25m.A jawdropping stunner once named Australian House of the Year for its design has hit the market and immediately became the hottest home for sale in Queensland. LJ Hooker agent Nadine Edwards has the award-winning property on the market for sale by private treaty priced at $2.25million. Grab a bargain as coronavirus pushes landlords to enter long-term rental market More from newsParks and wildlife the new lust-haves post coronavirus9 hours agoNoosa’s best beachfront penthouse is about to hit the market9 hours agoVideo Player is loading.Play VideoPlayNext playlist itemMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:58Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:58 Playback Rate1xChaptersChaptersDescriptionsdescriptions off, selectedCaptionscaptions settings, opens captions settings dialogcaptions off, selectedQuality Levels720p720pHD432p432p216p216p180p180pAutoA, selectedAudio Tracken (Main), selectedFullscreenThis is a modal window.Beginning of dialog window. Escape will cancel and close the window.TextColorWhiteBlackRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentBackgroundColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyOpaqueSemi-TransparentTransparentWindowColorBlackWhiteRedGreenBlueYellowMagentaCyanTransparencyTransparentSemi-TransparentOpaqueFont Size50%75%100%125%150%175%200%300%400%Text Edge StyleNoneRaisedDepressedUniformDropshadowFont FamilyProportional Sans-SerifMonospace Sans-SerifProportional SerifMonospace SerifCasualScriptSmall CapsReset restore all settings to the default valuesDoneClose Modal DialogEnd of dialog window.This is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.Close Modal DialogThis is a modal window. This modal can be closed by pressing the Escape key or activating the close button.PlayMuteCurrent Time 0:00/Duration 0:00Loaded: 0%Stream Type LIVESeek to live, currently playing liveLIVERemaining Time -0:00 Playback Rate1xFullscreenHow much do I need to retire?00:58 Glass walls let in abundant light. The design wowed judges across the country.The home at 5 Planchonella Close, Edge Hill – which has three bedrooms, two bathrooms, parking for five vehicles and sits on a 0.48 ha piece of land – was the most viewed property in Queensland on realestate.com.au this week.Planchonella House took the Australian design world by storm in 2015 with its handcrafted structures, fixtures and glass walls and concrete, designed to balance fragility and strength in the middle of a tropical rainforest setting. The home hugs a ridge and has views of the Cairns skyline. Even the bathrooms are glassed in to seem a part of the rainforest.Its awards list includes taking out the prestigious Australian Institute of Architects Awards national gong for new houses in 2015, walking away with the Robin Boyd Award for Residential Architecture.In the leader up to that it was named the Far North Queensland Regional project of the year as well as house of the year and then went out to take out the top state title for new houses, the coveted Robin Dods Award for Residential Architecture. A view of the house from the custom made pool.center_img It was also a twin winner at the national Houses Awards that same year, winning Australian House of the Year as well as New House over 200sq m.Ms Edwards was marketing it as “a home with soul”.“Innovative open plan design embraces the concept of movable walls that turn open spaces into functional rooms and an effortless flow between indoor and outdoors,” was how she listed it. The home has a living rooftop with plants along all the edges of a viewing platform. 5 Planchonella Close combines concrete, glass and wood to seem more a piece of art than a house.“The rawness of the concrete is offset by rosewood timber window frames and fixtures to add natural warmth and texture to the abode. Extensive use of frameless glass windows and doors allows unobstructed views to be appreciated from every vantage point within the residence.”The home also has a private pool area and city views in the middle of a rainforest setting, yet is just 7km from the Cairns CBD. FOLLOW SOPHIE FOSTER ON TWITTER MORE: QLD leads with $2k coronavirus relief for struggling renterslast_img read more

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