March 3, 2021
  • 7:39 am Watch Members of Lettuce Join Vulfpeck For Late Night Jazz Fest Throwdown
  • 7:39 am The Disco Biscuits Share Full Videos Of Powerful Hometown Run At The Fillmore
  • 7:36 am The Claypool Lennon Delirium Transcends Universes At The Capitol Theatre
  • 7:35 am Phish Shows Off ‘California Love’ In Their Tour Closing Performance [Recap]
  • 7:31 am Hometeam New Years Rally To Enter 2017 With Music, Art, & Community In Florida

first_imgDo survivors of childhood cancer return to normal health as they grow up? According to new research from Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, overall health-related quality of life in young adult survivors of childhood cancer resembles that of middle-aged adults. In a study published today in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, the investigators show that childhood cancer survivors who are 18 to 29 years old report overall health–related quality of life similar to that reported by adults in the general population who are in their 40s.The key variable determining people’s sense of well-being is the presence or absence of chronic health conditions.  Childhood cancer survivors have been found to have higher risks of heart disease, infertility, lung disease, cancers, and other chronic conditions related largely to their prior chemotherapy, radiation, and surgery. Examining health indicators in 18-to-49 year-olds who participate in the national Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS), the investigators found that only 20 percent reported no chronic conditions. As survival of childhood cancer has increased substantially since the 1970s, research has expanded into ways to reduce the toxicity of treatment to minimize late effects as well as cure the disease. Although a number of pediatric cancers are now treated with less intensive therapies, aggressive treatments with high toxicities remain part of care. Read Full Storylast_img read more

READ MORE

first_img Fauci, Farmer, and Kim discuss coronavirus lessons so far In 2018, public and moral philosopher Martha C. Nussbaum received the award for her framework for thinking about human capabilities and exploring vulnerability, fear and anger in moral and political life. Last year, former Associate Justice of the Supreme Court of the United States Ruth Bader Ginsburg was recognized for her life’s work in pioneering gender equality and strengthening the rule of law. This year’s Berggruen Prize Jury, headed by Appiah, is an international group of authors and thinkers including Antonio Damasio, Yuk Hui, Elif Shafak, David Chalmers, Amy Gutmann, and Wang Hui. The institute announced that the work and ideas of Paul Farmer will be celebrated in a virtual talk moderated by their event partners BBC News World Service in late spring 2021.  Event details are expected to be announced in February 2021. Related Paul Farmer, the Kolokotrones University Professor and chair of the Department of Global Health and Social Medicine in the Blavatnik Institute at Harvard Medical School, was selected as the winner of the 2020 Berggruen Prize for Philosophy and Culture. The $1 million award, announced Dec. 16 by the Berggruen Prize Jury, is given annually to thinkers whose ideas have profoundly shaped human self-understanding and advancement in a rapidly changing world. Farmer was chosen for his impactful work at the intersection of public health and human rights. “We are proud to award Dr. Paul Farmer the Berggruen Prize for transforming how we think about infectious diseases, social inequality and caring for others while standing in solidarity with them. He has reshaped our understanding not just of what it means to be sick or healthy but also of what it means to treat health as a human right and the ethical and political obligations that follow,” said Kwame Anthony Appiah, chairman of the Berggruen Prize jury and professor of philosophy and law at New York University.Farmer is the author of 12 books written throughout a nearly 30-year career in building lifesaving medical care systems in resource-poor communities, most notably in Haiti and West Africa. This lifetime of global health expertise has been instrumental in understanding and addressing the complexities of the coronavirus pandemic. Bringing vast experience from the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, he and his colleagues at Partners In Health designed and implemented the COVID-19 response in Massachusetts, centered around an intensive contact tracing program inclusive of resource coordinators to help people isolate safely. This approach was widely adopted by dozens of other states. “As both thinker and actor, Dr. Paul Farmer has connected the philosophical articulation of human rights to the practical pursuit of health,” said Nicolas Berggruen, chairman of the Berggruen Institute. “He has done this on the basis of new ideas and new analyses and also by connecting the human experience and practical politics of health to enduring challenges of human rights and justice. Not least, he has led by impressive moral example as an educator, a leader and a physician.”As the fifth winner of the prize, Farmer was selected from hundreds of nominees including some of the world’s most renowned thinkers spanning the fields of philosophy, social science, global justice, bioethics and beyond, the institute announced.In both theory and practice, Farmer has worked to change how the world thinks about health and disease. In AIDS and Accusation, Farmer addressed how disease was entangled with place and social relations by examining the profoundly interactive effects of social structure and biology. Farmer remained active in the struggle against AIDS, breaking new ground in linking analysis of gender, drugs and poverty. His lifelong commitment to Haiti is manifest both in his medical practice and in Haiti after the Earthquake, which remains among the most important analyses of when international assistance works and when it doesn’t. In Pathologies of Power, Farmer connected the struggle for better health to the pursuit of human rights bringing a crucial new dimension to our understanding of global public health which is also evident in his newest book, “Fevers, Feuds, and Diamonds: Ebola and the Ravages of History.”In 1983, he began his lifelong commitment to Haiti while still a student working with dispossessed farmers in Haiti’s Central Plateau. He served there for 10 years as medical director of a charity hospital, Good Savior Hospital. As a co-founder of Partners In Health, Farmer has led colleagues working in 12 sites throughout Haiti and 12 additional countries for the past 26 years. Founded in 1987, Partners in Health has become a model for health care for poor communities worldwide and provides the basis for developing a science of global health delivery implementation.“Most recently, Dr. Farmer demonstrates how best to address this pandemic and prevent future ones. Dr. Farmer’s call to improve public health systems is a matter not only of science but also of politics, economics, and ethics,” said Amy Gutmann, Berggruen prize juror and president of the University of Pennsylvania. “In this crisis, like the ones that preceded it, our knowledge far outpaces our will to put effective solutions into action. Farmer has shown that health and health care disparities worsen the pandemic, and he calls for the social as well as medical support needed by all communities ravaged by coronavirus. He also emphasizes — while doing all in his own power to address — the special burden of caregivers. And he helps explain why, for all its importance, the arrival of vaccines will not replace the need for basic public health measures.”Farmer is a member of the National Academy of Medicine and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and recently served as the United Nations special adviser to the secretary-general on community-based medicine and lessons from Haiti. Farmer is also HMS professor of medicine and chief of the Division of Global Health Equityat Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Established by philanthropist Nicolas Berggruen in 2016, the Berggruen Prize for Philosophy and Culture was first awarded to Canadian philosopher Charles Taylor for his impact on the humanities, social sciences and public affairs in deepening understanding among different intellectual traditions and civilization. Baroness O’Neill of Bengarve was the 2017 Berggruen Prize laureate for her work as a citizen philosopher who has elevated the quality of public life and improved the very vocabulary of public discourse. Researchers and public health experts unite to bring clarity to key metrics guiding coronavirus response Paul Farmer on Partners In Health, ‘Harvard-Haiti,’ and making the lives of the poor the fight of his life The path to zero ‘To be horrified by inequality and early death and not have any kind of plan for responding — that would not work for me’ Vaccine close, but it likely won’t be a silver bulletlast_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgThere’s only one day more exciting than our birthdays, Christmas, Hanukkah and Cinco de Mayo combined: Tony nomination day! Bruce Willis and Mary-Louise Parker woke up early to announce the 2015 Tony nominees live from the Diamond Horseshoe at the Paramount Hotel on April 28. We wonder if Parker, who is a Tony winner for Proof, gave Willis any tips about making his Broadway debut in Misery this fall? Check out these photos of the pair spreading the good news, then check out the full list of nominees here! Star Files View Commentscenter_img Mary-Louise Parkerlast_img

READ MORE

first_img Star Files James Monroe Iglehart from $57.50 Related Shows Aladdincenter_img View Comments James Monrow Iglehart(Photos: Mike Coppola/Getty Images, Cylla von Tiedemann, Bruce Glikas) In the corporate world, employees leaving a job are often asked to sit through an exit interview with HR about their time at the company. That concept doesn’t exist for Broadway performers, but we love checking in with stars as they finish up a successful run. Broadway ain’t never had a friend like James Monroe Iglehart, who won a well-deserved Tony Award for originating the role of the show-stopping Genie in Aladdin. Iglehart, who documented early days in the role as a Broadway.com vlogger, will play his final performance in the role on February 19. We asked the Hamilton-bound powerhouse to take our Exit Interview and tell us all about what he’ll miss, what he learned and more about his magical time in the show.How did you feel when you first got this job?Unbelievable! Working for Disney had been my dream since I was 10, and I was playing my favorite Disney character. Absolutely unbelievable.How do you feel now that you’re leaving?It’s bittersweet. I love this show. I love this cast, and I love this company. This has been the best professional experience I have ever had. Although it’s hard to leave my family here, I am very excited about starting a new adventure with Hamilton.What are three words you would use to describe your experience?Wish-fulfillment. Funny. Life-changing.What was the easiest thing about this job?Falling in love with the project and the people.  What was the hardest thing?Building the stamina to do all the work for outside of the show: All the interviews, tv appearances and radio spots. I love it, but it was a workout.What was the highlight of your time at this job?I have so many but here are the highlights: Opening night! That night was spectacular. Winning the Tony! A dream come true.Being a part of the Disney family. Being on the Blu-ray disc of Aladdin. Meeting: Whoopi Goldberg, President Obama and Mrs. Obama, WWE stars Mick Foley & Xavier Woods, Laurell K. Hamilton and Peter David. I have never laughed more backstage than I have with this show.What skills do you think are required for future job applicants?A childlike enthusiasm, a silly sense of humor, a very strong work ethic and a lot of stamina!What advice would you give to future employees in your job position?Have fun and make it your own.  How do you think you’ve grown?I think I have grown as a person and as a performer. My confidence in myself is much stronger now because during the first weeks of the show I got really ill and was able to do the show even in the midst of feeling terrible. That made me feel like I could do anything. Why are you leaving?Well, the rent in the lamp got too high, so I figured it was time to go! What will you miss the most?The cast, the crew and the kids that come see the show.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgWhy is such a bountiful region struggling to get healthy food onto dinner tables?On the outskirts of Staunton, Va., sits a little red brick building with a screen door and whitewash shutters. It doesn’t look like much on the outside, but what happens inside the aptly named restaurant The Shack is emblematic of a movement that is much larger than its 400-square-foot space.“Do I cook Appalachian food? Well, I cook food of the region inspired by the region with ingredients from the region, so sure, I’m an Appalachian chef. Why not?” says The Shack’s owner and chef Ian Boden.His hesitancy to associate with the label “Appalachian” might come across as crass were it not for the fact that The Shack is a tribute to Boden’s wife’s Grandma Tissy, who raised her children in a humble cabin nearby. The Shack’s logo is an artistic rendering of Grandma Tissy’s home. Inside the restaurant, framed black and white photos of the family’s history adorn the walls.“She was the epitome of Appalachian hospitality,” says Boden. “She raised the neighborhood even though she had no money. She gardened, she canned, she bartered, she did whatever she had to do to get by and feed her family.”It’s that sense of good-natured, open door geniality that Boden was yearning for after spending nearly a decade in New York’s exclusive restaurant scene. His own Russian-Hungarian-Jewish upbringing in northern Virginia, which at the time was largely farmland, fostered a strong sense of place that he hardly realized was important to him until he ate at restaurants that missed the mark.“It felt forced,” he says of eating at a barbeque restaurant in New York. “It felt like a hoax,” not because of the ingredients or techniques the restaurant used, says Boden. “I think it’s a feel.”So What is Appalachian Food?The Shack was listed as runner-up for best new restaurant in Esquire’s inaugural American Food and Drink Awards in 2014 and ranked as one of Southern Living’s Best Restaurants in the South. Boden’s locally sourced dishes reflect the blend of Appalachian and eastern European influence in his life: chicken and dumplings made with matzo, butterbean hummus without the chickpeas. Despite his tendency to hold labels like “Appalachian” and “farm-to-table” at arm’s length, Appalachian food advocates are rejoicing in the national coverage restaurants like The Shack are receiving for one reason—the region is finally being recognized as the culturally diverse hotbed that it is.“Appalachian and southern food in general has been pigeonholed into a stereotype, a caricature of itself,” Boden says. “People have simplified what Appalachia is. They’ve tried to boil it down to its essence and what they think the essence of it is is completely off-base.”No one understands this misperception more than chef Mike Costello. His own Appalachian roots can be traced back to the late 1800s when his great-grandmother moved to Helvetia, W.Va., from Switzerland at the age of 10. For so long, Appalachian culture and cuisine has been depicted as a monoculture, Costello says, and with mainstream media playing into that skewed portrait, he worries that it’s even affecting how Appalachians view themselves.Mike Costello’s Appalachian roots can be traced back to the late 1800s when his great-grandmother moved to Helvetia, W.Va., from Switzerland at the age of 10.“Our heritage here in Appalachia is so rich and so diverse. Food is our opportunity to tell a better, more accurate story of Appalachia,” he says. “If you ask someone what are three items they think of when they hear ‘Appalachian food’ they’ll say biscuits and gravy and country ham. What might surprise people about Appalachia is something like an eastern European borscht is just as Appalachian as gravy and Italian sausage is just as Appalachian as country ham. The list goes on and on.”Through their 170-acre property, Lost Creek Farm, Mike and his wife Amy are giving Appalachia’s food heritage the voice it never had. They forage for wild ramps, plant heirloom crops, pickle and can. Then they take those ingredients, as well as their own family stories, on the road. From The Central Collective in Knoxville to Rising Creek Bakery in Mount Morris, Penn., Mike and Amy’s schedule is packed with pop-up dinners and culinary workshops throughout and beyond Appalachia. Part dining, part storytelling, their message is simple: Appalachian food is defined by sense of place.“What they eat at the base of New York state, the top of the Appalachian region, is completely different than what they eat in northern Georgia,” adds chef Travis Milton.Like Costello, Milton’s past is rooted deep in the hills of Appalachia. Originally from Castlewood, Va., Milton decided to return to his hometown to open not just one but three restaurants in Southwest Virginia that pay homage to the food and farm culture on which he was raised. His restaurants feature items like leather britches, sour corn (think sauerkraut, but with corn), and Candy Roaster squash, an heirloom variety native to central Appalachia. Having worked as a chef outside of Appalachia for years, Milton says that when he finally made the decision to head out on his own, he knew his restaurant had to be close to home.“One of the things I preach is being non-extractive,” Milton says. “If I open an Appalachian restaurant in Richmond, what benefit is the Appalachian region seeing other than the word ‘Appalachian’ appearing in an article in the magazine? I wanted to come back here because foodways can be a part of the economic diversification that needs to happen in Appalachia.”Reclaiming Sense of PlaceWhat Milton is putting into action is something indicative of Appalachia as a whole: an unabashed sense of pride in place. It’s a fierce, determined pride, subtle, not gloating, and according to Milton and Costello both, if the region could just harness that passion, Appalachians might stand a chance of actually deciding their economic future, as opposed to having an outside industry dictate it for them. The problem, says Costello, has everything to do with the stigma surrounding all things Appalachian.Travis Milton’s past is rooted deep in the hills of Appalachia. Photo by Beth Furguson.“When I first worked at a restaurant in Charleston, the further away ingredients came from the better,” Costello says. “In a place like West Virginia, ‘local’ was not a symbol of quality. It was frowned upon. We sort of have this tendency to see what we have to offer as not all that special or marketable. We look at other states and see what looks popular and then try to do it here. What we come up with is a much less authentic version.”Costello likens this phenomenon to opening a beach-themed water park in the mountains—it just doesn’t make sense. As with the region’s musical heritage and outdoor recreational amenities, Costello wants Appalachians, and especially West Virginians, to honor their place-based food heritage and be the ones to share those stories. Otherwise, somebody else will.“If there’s a chef in Brooklyn who’s decided that he’s going to show off an Appalachian menu with ramps and morels, if he doesn’t know those stories behind those things, it goes from Appalachian food to Brooklyn food that just so happens to have some Appalachian ingredients,” he says. “There is a movement around Appalachian food right now and if we don’t do enough to insert ourselves in the narrative, that’s going to continue to happen and those rich stories about our land, our people, and the traditions connected to that land aren’t going to be told and that’s going to be a real shame for Appalachia.”Josh Bennett doesn’t need to be told to own his story. A West Virginia native, Bennett is keeping the cider-making traditions of his community alive through Hawk Knob Cidery in Lewisburg, W.Va.The cidery, which Bennett started with his business partner Will Lewis back in December 2015, is West Virginia’s first cidery. Dry yet approachable, Hawk Knob’s ciders are unique not only in their slight bourbon aftertaste (a result of using oak casks for barrel aging), but in the fact that Bennett uses 100 percent West Virginia heritage variety apples.Josh Bennett doesn’t need to be told to own his story. A West Virginia native, Bennett is keeping the cider-making traditions of his community alive through Hawk Knob Cidery in Lewisburg, W.Va.“Financially it’s quite a bit harder to do,” Bennett says of sourcing locally, particularly with heritage varieties. “If I weren’t dedicated to having a truly West Virginian grown product, I could do this a whole lot cheaper. But in the end, it’s not going to be the same kind of product. There’s something to be said for keeping things close to home.”Local Food on the National AgendaBusiness for Hawk Knob has been good. In the first three months of opening, the cidery sold out of product. For Bennett, the challenge isn’t so much getting West Virginians to drink his cider—it’s connecting the dots to form a bigger picture that puts West Virginia right up there with its Virginia neighbor as a food and beverage destination unto its own.“Napa Valley didn’t happen because there were a couple of producers doing their own thing,” Bennett says. “Napa Valley happened because of a conglomeration of growers and the state backing that industry. We have the same potential here. We’ve had to shoulder the weight ourselves of promoting this sort of thing. There’s a lot of room for the state to be involved.”More importantly, argues Burnsville, N.C.,-based author Ronni Lundy, the federal government should be involved, too. Lundy, a Corbin, Ky., native, has spent the better part of her career immersing herself in Appalachian culture. Her recently released book, Victuals (pronounced, “vidls”), explores Appalachian food traditions across the region. In eight years of research for Victuals, Lundy says she was heartened to see the regional food movement’s scope thus far, but fears the change in political agenda may be a detriment to that energy.[nextpage title=”Read on”]“What we have right now is a moment. People are interested in the food and the stories we’re telling about that food, but we’re scrambling as fast as we can to figure out how to make it economically feasible for us,” says Lundy. “If we could get just a little bit of help in the right places, we could do just fine, but I’m afraid we’re again going to become a colony for an extractive industry.”The federal government’s change in priorities is proving especially worrisome given that federal grants from the Obama-era POWER Initiative are already in play in Appalachia’s coalfields. Some of that money created small-scale agriculture programs, like Refresh Appalachia. But those funds aren’t endless, and many are concerned about the future of initiatives that support agriculture. As central Appalachia in particular seeks other means of economic diversification while battling ongoing health crises like obesity and food deserts, these programs are desperately needed.Local Food Access in Appalachia: Challenges and SolutionsFor some communities, simply finding local produce is hard enough, let alone affording a “farm-to-table” meal. In central Appalachia, where poverty rates are high, car ownership is low, and distances to grocery stores can be over 10 miles, people are especially at risk of losing access to fresh fruits and vegetables altogether. In West Virginia and North Carolina, for example, four out of five counties are considered food deserts. That number is increasing by the day as Wal-marts force mom-and-pop grocery stores out of business and then, as in the most recent case of McDowell County, W.Va., Wal-marts begin shutting their doors, too.There’s another underlying issue that is essential to understanding the current state of Appalachia. As a whole, the region is losing population at an alarming rate. In McDowell County, population dropped 2.2 percent in 2015, bringing its overall population below 20,000 for the first time since the 1900 census.“My generation, we were encouraged to go away if you were smart, if you were talented, if you were good in some field,” says Lundy, now in her late 60s. “You were encouraged to get your education somewhere else and establish your life somewhere else.”That’s exactly what many of Appalachia’s younger generations have been doing for decades. Factor in the former coal miners leaving the region in search of work, and it’s no wonder McDowell County’s Wal-mart decided it wasn’t economically viable to stay open.Refresh Appalachia is hoping to address some of those problems. The program, an arm of the Coalfield Development Corporation, targets disadvantaged young people ages 18-25 and those that have lost coal jobs. In addition to providing small-scale farming experience and an Associate’s degree, Refresh Appalachia pays its participants above minimum wage for the nearly three-year duration of the program. That’s a drop in the bucket for former coal miners used to a $60,000 salary, but it’s an income nonetheless.“People who used to work in mining are going to be taking a huge pay cut if they stay in the region, no matter what they do,” says Refresh Appalachia Program Director Savanna Lyons. “We want to give them all the tools they can to help them figure out this transition.”Programs like Refresh Appalachia are also helping tackle a much larger issue: the disparity between low-income families living in food deserts and farmers trying to make a living. Food labeled “local” is often associated with higher price tags, and rightfully so. It is more expensive to grow on and buy from a small-scale farm. Refresh Appalachia delivers its produce to communities where food access is limited and offers scheduled sliding scale pricing, but the struggle to implement accessibility region-wide is not going to be an easy obstacle to overcome.In Knoxville, Tenn., that access to fresh produce is very much a challenge. Despite the fact that Knox County has a farmers’ market nearly every day of the week, year-round, and that many of those markets accept EBT and SNAP doubling, the county alone has 20 food deserts. According to Nourish Knoxville’s Executive Director Charlotte Tolley, part of the problem is that farmers’ markets feel too trendy, which alienates the people who could benefit from them the most.“East Knoxville is considered a food desert and that is one of the communities that feels like downtown is not ‘for them,’” says Tolley. “There’s some urban planning I would blame for that. The James White Parkway is a huge road that visually divides East Knoxville from downtown. It feels much more difficult to walk to, but we want to let people know that the farmers’ market and downtown is for everyone.”“Crummy food is subsidized and far more available and cheaper to people who have issues with money, and many of us in Appalachia have issues with money,” adds Lundy. “We don’t want to gentrify food to such an extent that we make it impossible for the people who have worked so hard to continue to live here to be able to eat.”Appalachia’s Future Returns to Its RootsA 2016 economic report conducted by the University of Kentucky showed that the state ranks 11th in the country for CSA farms. In West Virginia, restaurants and lodging facilities have increased their purchase of local food by 360 percent. Restaurants in North Carolina like Rosetta’s Kitchen in Asheville and F.A.R.M. Cafe in Boone are offering sliding scale meals and work-for-payment plans to help increase accessibility to local foods.Studies also show that staying local and living sustainably are of increasing importance to the millennial generation. Just ask Lars Prillaman, 33, of Shepherdstown, W.Va. Prillaman and his girlfriend Leslie own and operate Green Gate Farm where they grow vegetables, raise animals, and operate almost entirely on horsepower. Literally.Prillaman owns two Percheron draft mares, May and Tulip. Together, the two-horse team weighs in around 3,600 pounds. With their combined strength, the horses can take care of everything a tractor would normally do, from mowing to tilling.That’s all part of Prillaman’s plan to not only have a sustainable farm but to also reduce dependency on fossil fuels. Running a farm hasn’t been an easy, or extremely profitable, endeavor—after four years of operation, Prillaman says they finally turned a profit just last year. But he’s not in it for the money. It’s a lifestyle choice.“Things go wrong inherently in this line of work,” says Prillaman. “If you’re wanting a career that rakes in the dough, and you think organic agriculture is the next hot thing, forget it.”Prillaman is one of many in Appalachia going back to the region’s roots, and not because it’s the trendy thing to do. Chef Mike Costello and his wife Amy inherited Lost Creek Farm, where Amy’s grandparents settled in the mid-1800s. Unlike Prillaman, Costello isn’t a full-time farmer yet. He and his wife both maintain part-time gigs to help supplement their lifestyle. But he says preserving the heritage and history of not just their farm but the region at large is something he is deeply committed to.“We wanted to operate a business that was very much based on sense of place and the heritage that’s connected to that place,” says Costello. “The marketability of food is all about the story that’s attached to the food, and that’s what’s really giving us in Appalachia the opportunity we have today.”For Mountain State Trout owner Thomas Wimer, upholding his family’s history is precisely the reason he bought back the family hatchery two years ago. Nestled in the hills of Franklin, W.Va., the hatchery was first built in 1953 by Wimer’s great grandfather. In 1990, he sold it out of the family, but Wimer was determined to buy it back and carry on the tradition.“I’ve been around all over the country and I love it here. I knew this is where I wanted to be and this is what I wanted to do.”His trout have some of the cleanest, purest water in the region thanks to a spring that surfaces on the property from an underground cave. Wimer charges about $6.50 per pound for his frozen trout, which is cheaper even than the fish you’d find at Kroger.“My ancestors lived off the land, and I think there are a lot of people in our age group getting back to that idea because it makes sense. It’s what’s good.”Appalachia has long been painted as a region where dependency on outsiders is systemic, but that’s not been Wimer’s experience. Nor Costello’s or Milton’s. By and large, the backbone of their Appalachia has been a uniquely creative sense of resilience and community-mindedness.“It’s hard as outsiders to visualize just how hard of a time this is in Appalachia,” says Refresh Appalachia’s Savanna Lyons, “but it’s not just a story about victims. It’s a story about people who have persevered in the region and have been through a lot of hard times. All of that tenacity is still here. These are truly resilient people.”The road ahead will be filled with no shortage of bumps and dead-ends. Restrictions on cottage industry food processing and an increasingly heated political and environmental climate mean farm and food advocates have their work cut out for them in the years to come. But there’s probably no other segment of America more accustomed to hard work than the people of Appalachia.“Hopefully we can come to more consensus in our communities and not have this great division,” says author Ronni Lundy. “If we can’t do it over food, we can’t do it over anything.”last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgFear. Uncertainty. A growing sense of panic every time you scroll through social media or watch the news. Even with interest rates essentially at zero percent, the stock market (and 401(k) balances) continue to tumble. Chatter among friends and co-workers is filled with questions like: Should I get married? Can I afford to pay my rent? Will I get sick? Will I have a job tomorrow?Does any of this sound familiar?As scary as things seem right now due to the impact of the coronavirus, it’s essential to remember that we’ve lived through eerily familiar economic horror stories many times before. Most recently, in 2008, when we weathered the financial crisis that resulted from the collapse of the US real estate market.Now, more than ten years later, we can agree that it’s never fun to go through a downturn, but each of us is stronger because of the tough times we’ve endured. So, here we are, facing yet another crisis—one with a multitude of unknown variables. With all the uncertainty swirling around, what can you do differently this time to come out stronger when the current crisis ends?For starters, don’t let fear be your guiding light. Yes, I know that’s easier said than done. We’re dealing with a scenario that probably never made your list of worst-case scenarios. But at this point, we have to play the hand we’ve been dealt. So, let’s get down to it. Here are a couple of actions you can take to help your team endure this time and make sure your credit union comes roaring back as soon as possible:Embrace TransparencyUnderstand that your team is afraid. You can help alleviate their fear by openly sharing the situations that your credit union is facing. The day after I sent the YMC team home to begin working remotely, I penned a letter to each team member sharing where we were as a team. I shared that I lost my first agency in the financial crisis of 2008, and I learned a lot. I owned my role in the demise of that business and outlined the steps I’ve taken to ensure those mistakes don’t happen again. I shared how we’ve taken intentional steps to prepare for an event like this. Most importantly, I was honest about my fear. I didn’t make promises I couldn’t keep, and I reassured each team member that, even in a worst-case scenario, we’re prepared.An open-book management approach will empower and bond your team as you tackle the challenge of this time together. If you can share the current reality, make sure everyone is on the same page, and establish clear plans to weather the storm, your team will step up to the plate to help.I should also mention that it’s critical to recognize that you don’t have all of the answers. Open yourself to accept ideas and creative suggestions from your team. Not tapping into the wisdom of your people means potentially missing out on great ideas and the opportunity to develop solutions together.When you have the courage to share the ugly truth and be completely transparent, people don’t run; they are more than happy to help, and they want to find ways to contribute.Get Ready for the UpturnEven the most pessimistic person has to admit that there will be an upturn. Even while you’re managing the day-to-day fires that arise, you need to be doing what you can to prepare for the future. As bad and as uncertain as things look today, remind yourself that it’s actually harder to prepare to take advantage of an upturn than it is to prepare for a downturn!Despite the overwhelming negatives, downturns give you opportunities to fix things inside your organization, issues or inefficiencies that you can’t afford to address when the economy is booming (think remote working and fintech). While it might seem counterintuitive, the current down market effectively provides a kind of short-term relief. It’s giving us a chance to catch up, to invest in our people and facilities, and to prepare ourselves to capitalize on the economic uptick that is expected to hit in late-2020, early-2021.Today, as we deal with the realities of our situation—quarantines, shorter workweeks, or the worst case for many, unemployment—you, as a leader, should be thinking creatively about how to invest in your people. If they have to be at home, they can be learning about financial literacy or gaining other new skills to prepare for the “new normal.” When they come back, they will have even more to contribute to the team. And though all of this may sound self-serving, making these investments now will prepare you to serve your members better—and potentially hire back those who have lost their jobs—when the tough times come to an end.Things are painful right now—I feel it, too. The health and safety of our team, our friends, and our families is our highest priority—and rightfully so. Take time to cycle through your emotions, but don’t let fear take over and rule your decision-making process. Embrace transparency and practice financial discipline. Then, focus on guiding your credit union through the next few decades by embracing the “new normal” and meeting the needs of your members on the other side of this current challenge. 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Bo McDonald Bo McDonald is president of Your Marketing Co. A marketing firm that started serving credit unions nearly a decade ago, offering a wide range of services including web design, branding, … Web: yourmarketing.co Detailslast_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgNov 22, 2006 (CIDRAP News) – Two new reports on human cases of H5N1 avian influenza that occurred in Turkey and Indonesia last year show that the illness proved difficult to diagnose, with many tests yielding false-negative results.A report on eight cases in Turkey and a similar report on eight Indonesian cases, published in the Nov 23 New England Journal of Medicine, says many of the patients tested negative the first time around, even on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests.The Turkish report describes 8 of the 12 confirmed cases the country has had so far, all of which occurred in late December 2005 and January 2006. All eight patients—four of whom survived—were treated at a hospital in Van in eastern Turkey. The patients included sets of three and two siblings, and seven lived in the same community.The hospital tested a total of 290 patients for avian flu during the outbreak, using a rapid influenza test, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and real-time PCR. All the rapid and ELISA test results were negative, the report says.Four of the eight case-patients initially had negative results on all three tests, using nasopharyngeal specimens. Because the patients were severely ill, the tests were repeated using tracheal aspirate specimens, and the real-time PCR tests then were positive. Tests of nasopharyngeal specimens established the diagnosis in the other four patients.”Before H5N1 infection was diagnosed in the eight patients, a total of 8 real-time PCR tests, 12 rapid influenza tests, and 12 ELISA tests were negative,” the article states.The Indonesian report covers three family clusters of H5N1 cases that occurred between June and October of 2005 and included the country’s first cases. The clusters consisted of three cases in Tangerang, Java; two cases in Bintaro, Java; and three in Lampung, Sumatra. Four of the eight patients died.All rapid tests on the patients were negative, and many reverse-transcriptase PCR tests were negative, particularly with nasal specimens, according to the report. Throat swabs were more likely to test positive on RT-PCR than nasal swabs were.The Turkish authors write, “Because of the difficulties in detecting H5N1 infection, repeated testing from nasopharyngeal swabs or deep tracheal-aspiration samples in patients who are strongly suspected of having H5N1 infection should be performed even if tests of initial nasophyaryngeal swabs are negative.”In other findings, the Indonesian report says that the source of infection for the first patient in two of the clusters was never identified. The three patients in the first cluster reported no contact with birds, other animals, or sick people other than family members before they fell ill. In the second cluster, patients reported no contact with birds, other animals, or sick people, but the index patient used fertilizer containing chicken droppings that tested positive for H5N1.The report says limited person-to-person transmission could not be ruled out in the first two Indonesian clusters, since the patients had no other known exposures to the virus.Three of the four Indonesian patients who recovered were children (aged 4, 5, and 9) who had mild disease. This resembles the pattern in Hong Kong’s 1997 H5N1 outbreak, in which most children who were infected had relatively mild disease, the article says.The Indonesian authors write that the clusters in Indonesia and Turkey, as well as others in Hong Kong, Vietnam, Thailand, China, and Azerbaijan, “raise questions as to whether genetic or other factors may predispose some persons to H5N1 virus infection or to severe disease.”They add that more investigation is needed to understand “the role of mild cases in the epidemiology of this disease and whether genetic, behavioral, immunologic, and environmental factors may contribute to case clustering.”Oner AF, Bay A, Arslan S, et al. Avian influenza A(H5N1) infection in eastern Turkey in 2006. N Engl J Med 2006 Nov 23;355(21):2179-85 [Abstract]Kandun IN, Wibosono H, Sedyaningsih ER, et al. Three Indonesian clusters of H5N1 virus infection in 2005. N Engl J Med 2006 Nov 23;355(21):2186-94 [Abstract]See also:Oct 31 CIDRAP News story “WHO: H5N1 cases in Turkey targeted children, youth”last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgOle Gunnar Solskjaer fires warning to PSG following Man Utd’s win over Southampton Metro Sport ReporterSaturday 2 Mar 2019 5:40 pmShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link76Shares Solskjaer is currently the interim manager of United (Picture: Getty)Ole Gunnar Solskjaer is optimistic Manchester United can beat Paris-Saint Germain following their win over Southampton on Saturday.The Red Devils came from behind to emerge victorious over the Saints, with a brace from Romelu Lukaku and a goal from Andreas Pereira helping navigate the side to a 3-2 victory.Their next task is overcoming a 2-0 deficit in the Champions League on Tuesday night in their round-of-16 clash against the Ligue 1 giants.It remains a huge ask, but Solskjaer is positive and believes his squad are more than capable of coming away with a result following Saturday’s victory.AdvertisementAdvertisementMore: FootballRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starChelsea defender Fikayo Tomori reveals why he made U-turn over transfer deadline day moveMikel Arteta rates Thomas Partey’s chances of making his Arsenal debut vs Man City‘It was one of those games, it had everything,’ Solskjaer told the BBC. ‘It was an open game and they [Southampton] came here to beat us.‘We should have been 1-0, 2-0 up in the first five minutes. They settled down and scored with two unbelievable strikes. My team did fantastic and the boys did great in the second half.‘The belief is there, they have gone so long without losing games and are raring to go. They want to get on the ball and the confidence is high. They were class finishes from Romelu Lukaku and I am so pleased for Andreas Pereira.More: Manchester United FCRio Ferdinand urges Ole Gunnar Solskjaer to drop Manchester United starNew Manchester United signing Facundo Pellistri responds to Edinson Cavani praiseEx-Man Utd coach blasts Ed Woodward for two key transfer errors Comment Advertisement Lukaku has scored four goals in his last two games (Picture: Getty)‘Rom is a goalscorer, he keeps practicing every single day and has quality. When we changed to two up front that helped him as well. We had some great play at times, 3-2 we did it the hard way. That’s why we are turning grey.‘We have done fantastically well away from home but we go to PSG with the belief, we have nothing to lose. We will give it a go. This club has done so many great comebacks, the tie is not done.‘The dressing room is bouncing at the moment.’Following United’s next trip to Paris they then take on Arsenal in the Premier League on March 10.MORE: Solskjaer provides worrying Alexis Sanchez injury update after Man Utd beat SouthamptonWill United finish in the top four this season?Yes0%No0%Share your resultsShare your resultsTweet your results Advertisementlast_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgAuctions are usually pretty serious but sometimes they can just be hysterical, according to Haesley Cush.AS auction numbers around the country are about to explode I thought I’d share some of the funnier auction stories I’d seen over the years. What prompted me to think about this was last week I was mid call with a bid in the high six hundred thousands and a buyer asked ‘what’s the bid?’, now to lighten the mood I said ‘umm $953,000’’, the crowd laughed, he smirked. “No sir the bid is actually $690,000,’’ I corrected. To which he replied ‘‘OK then, add the $953 on top’.Touche! this took the bid to $690,953, much to the delight of the enormous crowd. It went on the sell for $725,000.A month or so ago I was at a house in Graceville. Bidding had opened and the bid was $600,000. A bidder raised his card and I heard “sixteen”.“‘Good strategy,’’ I replied and raised the bid to $616,000.“No!’ Yelled the man, ‘six teen’.’’“Yes sir,” I replied, “I have taken your $16,000. It’s unorthodox, but I like your style,” I said while trying to lighten the mood and not really sure why he was getting worked up. More from newsMould, age, not enough to stop 17 bidders fighting for this home1 hour agoBuyers ‘crazy’ not to take govt freebies, says 28-yr-old investor1 hour ago“No, you #!#initialState#amp;@ing !#initialState#amp;@?, Tin, I am bidding another tin thousand to six tin.’’Oh boy, it dawned on me, I’d misheard the kiwi accent and he wanted to bid to $610,000. I apologised, he smiled and it eventually sold to someone else for $630,000 – a rare win for the Aussies. You never know how the crowd will behave and what they’ll shout out at auction, according to Haesley Cush.Regular tactics can include people dressing up or dressing down, bidding really fast or super slow and being overly aggressive or ultra friendly. There really is no consistency.I remember an auction in the early 2000s. It was for a hobby farm outside of Brisbane. A beautifully groomed couple attended the auction to buy it. The younger female partner was glowing with energy and as the auction started she started bidding.The interesting bit was, she wouldn’t stop, over and over she called out increase after increase on her own bids, to the sheer delight of the crowd and the owners. Far be it for the auctioneer to stop an enthusiastic bidder from paying more.They were of course the eventual winners and their post auction celebratory embrace was nearly as exciting as their bidding.With auction numbers about to peak, be on the look out for the strange, the weird and the wonderful auction strategies. I’ll report back with some others in the coming weeks.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgChevron OneMore than $33 million in sales have been recorded at Chevron One, the first apartment tower to offer island living just minutes from Surfers Paradise.Owner occupiers, in particular, have embraced the $260 million arts-inspired residential tower, with 26 apartments, including a $3.25 million sub-penthouse, sold since its official launch.The 247-apartment tower is being developed by Melbourne-based Bensons Property Group.Bensons’ Property Group managing director Rick Curtis said he was delighted with the enthusiastic market response to the 40-level Chevron One. “Chevron One is very much a place to live, not just to stay, and that approach is reflected in the scale and design of each apartment and the superb resort-style facilities that residents have just below,” Mr Curtis said. “We believe Chevron One has captured the best of both worlds by delivering apartment living in a vibrant island community just a short walk to everything Surfers Paradise has to offer.”More from news02:37International architect Desmond Brooks selling luxury beach villa17 hours ago02:37Gold Coast property: Sovereign Islands mega mansion hits market with $16m price tag2 days agoChevron One is located close to HOTA (Home of the Arts, the Arts Centre Gold Coast), and has incorporated specially-curated art into residents’ communal spaces. The spaces will include an extensive art collection including sculptural works by artists such as James Parrett and Deborah Halpern.Chevron One, which was designed by Marchese Partners, offers a range of one, two, three and four-bedroom apartments wrapped in wave-inspired architecture.Each apartment features seamless indoor to outdoor living spaces complemented by contemporary finishes such as stone benchtops, timber floors, luxurious bathrooms and kitchens designed by award-winning celebrity chef Shannon Bennett.Apartments will overlook the Surfers Paradise skyline, the ocean, Nerang River and the hinterland depending on their location within the tower.It will be constructed within easy walking distance of the beach, and just 500m from the entertainment and light rail in Surfers Paradise.Residents’ facilities will be located at Club One, and will include indoor and outdoor pools, a barbecue area, al fresco dining, gymnasium, yoga and sculpture garden, outdoor cinema, residents’ lounge and bicycle racks.Chevron One is the first Queensland project for Bensons Property Group. Apartments start from $455,000 for one-bedroom to $3.2 million for the four-bedroom residences.Construction is scheduled to be completed by early 2021.last_img read more

READ MORE