March 3, 2021
  • 7:39 am Watch Members of Lettuce Join Vulfpeck For Late Night Jazz Fest Throwdown
  • 7:39 am The Disco Biscuits Share Full Videos Of Powerful Hometown Run At The Fillmore
  • 7:36 am The Claypool Lennon Delirium Transcends Universes At The Capitol Theatre
  • 7:35 am Phish Shows Off ‘California Love’ In Their Tour Closing Performance [Recap]
  • 7:31 am Hometeam New Years Rally To Enter 2017 With Music, Art, & Community In Florida

first_imgProfessor of Astronomy David Charbonneau and Professor of Organismic and Evolutionary Biology and Molecular and Cellular Biology Hopi Hoekstra have been named as the recipients of the inaugural Fannie Cox Prize for Excellence in Science Teaching.Created to recognize outstanding teaching in introductory science courses, the prize was established through a gift from Gardner Hendrie ’54. Winners are nominated by a committee composed of faculty from across the sciences and selected by Dean of Science and Mallinckrodt Professor of Geophysics and Professor of Computational Science Jeremy Bloxham for their ability to inspire students, instill in them a passion for science, and effectively communicate complex ideas. Each winner receives a grant of $40,000 in unrestricted support for research and teaching, as well as a $10,000 personal award.“I want to congratulate David and Hopi on receiving this award, and recognize their amazing work to instill a passion for scientific learning in our students,” Bloxham wrote in a letter to faculty announcing the prize. “It is my hope that this prize and the examples set by this year’s recipients will both promote excellence in teaching and demonstrate that great teaching and outstanding research can, and do, go hand in hand.”“David Charbonneau and Hopi Hoekstra are both prime examples of what makes Harvard, and the Faculty of Arts and Sciences [FAS], exceptional places for students,” FAS Dean Michael D. Smith, the John H. Finley Jr. Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences, said. “In addition to being world-class researchers, both display a passion for teaching that is infectious among their colleagues and inspiring for their students. I congratulate them for this well-deserved honor.”In his announcement to faculty, Bloxham cited Charbonneau and Hoekstra’s consistently high ratings in the Q Guide (4.79 and 4.61, respectively, out of five). Charbonneau is also credited with increasing the number and diversity of astronomy concentrators, while the number of students in the introductory course in evolutionary biology co-taught by Hoekstra, who is also Alexander Agassiz Professor of Zoology, and Andrew Berry, lecturer on organismic and evolutionary biology, has gone from 34 in 2008 to 86 in 2011.Both Charbonneau and Hoekstra said they hope the prize draws attention to the importance of undergraduate education, and offers validation for the dedicated work of all faculty members.“The news of this prize came completely out of the blue, and was a huge lift,” Charbonneau said. “It is essential that we celebrate excellence in science teaching. The message that one sometimes hears is that research trumps teaching, but that doesn’t reflect the reality at Harvard in 2011. I find such joy in teaching and mentoring our undergraduates. The rejuvenation of our undergraduate curriculum in astrophysics is one of the things I am most proud of since I arrived as a professor seven years ago.”Charbonneau’s plans for the research funds include an idea he has worked on for some time — launching a research project in science education, with a focus toward encouraging a broader participation in the physical sciences.“I am truly humbled by this honor, and feel particularly lucky for two reasons,” Hoekstra said. “First, I teach a subject, evolutionary biology, about which I am truly passionate, so portraying an enthusiasm for the material comes naturally. Second, I co-teach the course with Andrew Berry, who is one of the most inspiring lecturers I have ever known; he has made me a better teacher, and we make a great team.“Perhaps one of the most challenging parts of our jobs as faculty is trying to balance teaching and research,” she added. ���While there are many prizes for excellence in research, there are far fewer recognizing teaching and still fewer recognizing excellence in both teaching and research. Thus, this award is especially unique and important.”last_img read more

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first_imgThey are the perennial complaints of pop-culture connoisseurs: Why are so many Hollywood movies lowest-common-denominator mash-ups of comic book heroes and pricey special effects? Why do radio stations only play the “top” 40 songs, half of which seem to involve Taylor Swift or Jay-Z? And why do some European soccer clubs such as Manchester United and Real Madrid tend to dominate year after year?The answer, says Harvard Business School (HBS) Professor Anita Elberse, is a strategy by successful executives across the entertainment world to place high-stakes bets on a handful of high-priced projects with top-tier talent — the blockbusters — rather than distributing resources over an array of lower-cost vehicles.The “idea of taking this huge risk is actually the best way to go and, in fact, is the safest approach,” Elberse, the Lincoln Filene Professor of Business Administration, said in a recent interview. “For many people, this is counterintuitive. They say, ‘You want to take as many shots at goal and hope one goes in.’ Actually no: You want to put yourself in the best position, really swing for the fences, and go all out in that one shot you’re taking.”Elberse’s debut book, “Blockbusters: Hit-Making, Risk-Taking, and the Big Business of Entertainment,” due out Oct. 15, builds on her pioneering research over the last decade into why some businesses and star-driven brands seem to thrive in the highly speculative and competitive marketplaces of film, music, sports, book publishing, and even nightclubs.Through her work developing HBS case studies, Elberse had rare, close-up looks at the operations and decision-making philosophies of top executives in those fields, including Sir Alex Ferguson, the recently retired, longtime manager of Manchester United; Warner Bros. studio head Alan Horn; and Troy Carter, the manager of musician-performer Lady Gaga. All offered closely held information about why they do what they do, insights rarely shared with the public.Elberse said the resurgence of Netflix from the success of “House of Cards” is the best example of her findings. “The moment they really broke through … was when they said … ‘We’re going to produce a $100 million show.’ This was a bet HBO walked away from. The sheer fact that Netflix is this nontelevision entity producing television, making a blockbuster bet on a handful of shows in a given year now in the hopes of making their business model work, is almost the best proof you could have that the blockbuster strategy works,” she said.Because most entertainment businesses rely primarily on the unpredictable tastes of consumers, inevitably what looks like a surefire winner on paper sometimes turns out to be a dud. But those big failures are not necessarily a reason to scale back.“You want to pick the right projects to bet on, and that’s still an inexact science. You need to spend it on the right things, but spending it on the right things costs money,” Elberse said. “In fact, it’s the very uncertainty that exists in the marketplace that makes this such an attractive strategy — because no one knows exactly what’s going to hit.“You’re buying security by relying on well-known stars or betting on property that was successful in the past, or by betting on something that looks a lot like something that was successful in the past,” she said.Time and again, Elberse found, companies that go “all-in” on a few choice projects with A-list stars and blockbuster potential tend to fare better than those that are more risk-averse.“It seems really sensible, but if you look at the results, it usually backfires and makes business results even worse,” said Elberse of taking a cautious approach. But spending less means getting less in critical areas that ultimately affect the bottom line.“You’re probably not going to get the right talent. You’re probably not going to be able to produce the kinds of products where people say ‘I’m willing to spend some money on it.’ You’re not going to have the advantages in marketing that betting on blockbusters brings with it. And you’re not going to have the support of retailers who are in between you as a producer and the consumer.”That dynamic also holds true in major sports. Elberse studied Real Madrid’s assembly of a premier soccer team by acquiring a roster of superstar players such Cristiano Ronaldo and David Beckham — which is quite different from clubs that can’t afford to spend millions and therefore must build talent from within.While a team of all-stars is no guarantee of success, and can sometimes even inhibit team chemistry, Elberse said that status gives clubs “tremendous marketing advantages.”“I see it almost as an assurance against losses,” she said. “Because the on-the-field results sometimes are just based on luck or what happens in that last minute or an injury. But betting on stars … brings you sustainability in the long run. If you manage that well and if you build an infrastructure around it, it sets the club up for a much longer time, [where] they can afford these types of investments.”One outgrowth of the blockbuster strategy is that it gives creative talent more leverage over businesses, which puts pressure on firms to up the ante. Savvy headliners, such as Lady Gaga or NBA star LeBron James, recognize the growing influence their names have in driving sales and are now demanding — and getting — a piece of the action from sponsors, not just an endorsement check.“It’s not a coincidence that it’s the biggest stars with the most star power who are making those moves,” she said, “because they realize they’re bringing a lot of value to these partnerships. If you already have sufficient wealth, then you can afford to take that risk on yourself.”Contrary to the popular notion that digital technology will democratize the market for musicians, filmmakers, and authors, giving everyone an equal shot at being recognized, Elberse said in reality, that’s not likely because of the increasingly high cost to break through the clutter.“In fact, digital technology will probably create bigger blockbusters and bigger superstars,” she said. “In many ways, everyone has a shot, but only so many people will win, and it tends to be the ones that have the biggest resources behind them. Reaching the top is probably going to be even harder.”last_img read more

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first_imgApril was significantly wetter than normal across most of the state, which recharged soil moisture but delayed planting of some summer crops. This was the fourth wettest April in Columbus in 67 years; the last time it was this wet was 1979 when 10.69 inches. It was the fifth wettest April for Macon in 122 years; the last time it was this wet was 1938 with 10.25 inches. It was also the ninth wettest year in Savannah in 78 years of record. Several other daily precipitation records were also set in April. Atlanta received 2.46 inches on April 7, beating the old record of 2.38 inches set in 1973. Alma received 2.52 inches, also on April 7, to surpass 1.59 inches from 1992. Two inches fell there on April 18, surpassing the old record of 1.04 inches set in 1969. Brunswick received 3.11 inches on April 18, much more than the old record amount of 0.72 inches set in 1953. The highest monthly total precipitation from National Weather Service reporting stations was 9.3 inches in Columbus (5.75 inches above normal) and the lowest was in Athens at 4.17 inches (1.02 inches above normal). Atlanta received 5.9 inches (2.54 above normal), Macon received 7.46 inches (4.50 above normal), Alma received 7.66 inches (4.85 above normal), Augusta received 4.59 inches (1.75 above normal), Brunswick received 7.92 inches (5.43 above normal) and Savannah received 5.55 inches (2.48 above normal). The highest single-day rainfall reported from the Community Collaborative Rain, Hall and Snow network was 5.14 inches near Manor in Ware County on April 8. Two other CoCoRaHS observers in Waycross reported 4.9 and 4.62 inches on the same day. The highest monthly total rainfall was 14.65 inches, observed 13 miles east-northeast of Fort Gaines in Clay County, followed by 12.13 inches measured northwest of Albany in Lee County. The University of Georgia Automated Environmental Monitoring Network station in Donalsonville (Seminole County) reported 23.54 inches for the month, including 5.93 inches on April 7 alone. Despite the wet weather, temperatures hovered around normal across the state. In Atlanta, the monthly average temperature was 62.7 degrees F (0.7 degrees above normal); in Athens it was 62.3 degrees (0.6 above normal); in Columbus it was 64.4 degrees (0.2 below normal); in Macon it was 63 degrees (0.4 below normal); in Savannah it was 68.1 degrees (2.5 above normal); in Brunswick it was 67.3 degrees (0.8 above normal); in Alma it was 65.8 degrees (0.4 below normal) and in Augusta it was 63.2 degrees (0.5 above normal). In addition to wet and temperate weather, April saw two waves of severe weather across Georgia. The first round occurred on April 7. Observers reported two tornadoes and damaging winds after a strong cold front came through. The two EF1 tornadoes were observed in Ocilla in Irwin County and Lowry, 8 miles northwest of Griffin in Spalding County. Three people were injured. A report on this flood and severe weather event can be found at www.srh.noaa.gov/ffc/?n=20140407_flooding_tornado. The second round of severe weather occurred April 28 in the wake of another strong front. Two tornadoes also occurred during this event, including an EF2 storm that moved from Troup County to Heard County. The second, an EF1 storm in Whitfield County, destroyed a chicken house and killed 16,000 chickens before crossing into Tennessee. In addition, a severe wind event associated with a “wake low” on April 30 caused strong wind gusts across central Georgia following a squall line. One man was killed in Athens when a tree limb fell on his van, and several others were injured. Many trees and power lines were blown down, causing scattered power outages and a few school closings due to the lack of power. A description of the storm can be found at www.srh.noaa.gov/ffc/?n=wakelow20140430.More news and information about the intersection of climate and agriculture can be found at blog.extension.uga.edu/climate/.last_img read more

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first_imgBNEF: Coal to account for just 12% of global electricity generation in 2050 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Renew Economy:New projections from Bloomberg New Energy Finance show that significant cost cuts to wind, solar, and battery storage, will help push the share of renewables in the global grid to nearly 50 per cent by 2050.Further, Bloomberg New Energy Finance (BNEF) believes that renewable energy technologies, at least through to 2030, will ensure that the power sector contributes its share to keeping global temperatures from rising more than 2°C.With electricity demand expected to increase by 62 per cent between now and 2050, resulting in global generating capacity almost tripling between 2018 and 2050, BNEF expects the solar, wind, and battery storage sectors will attract a cumulative $10 trillion in new investment.The new projections stem from BNEF’s New Energy Outlook 2019 (NEO 2019) report, published this week, which compares the cost of competing energy technologies through a levelized cost of energy analysis.“Our power system analysis reinforces a key message from previous New Energy Outlooks – that solar photovoltaic modules, wind turbines and lithium-ion batteries are set to continue on aggressive cost reduction curves, of 28%, 14% and 18% respectively for every doubling in global installed capacity,” explained Matthias Kimmel, NEO 2019 lead analyst. “By 2030, the energy generated or stored and dispatched by these three technologies will undercut electricity generated by existing coal and gas plants almost everywhere.”Specifically, according to BNEF’s NEO 2019, coal’s role in the global power mix will fall from providing 37 per cent of the globe’s electricity to only 12 per cent by 2050. Further, BNEF expects oil’s role as a power-generating source to be almost non-existent, while conversely, wind and solar will grow from providing a cumulative 7 per cent today to 48 per cent by 2050.More: Solar, wind and batteries to deliver 50% of global power by 2050last_img read more

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first_imgThese days, craft beer and bikes tend to go hand in hand, and Brevard is a mecca for both. The town of just under 7,500 is the east coast home of the bike-friendly, Colorado-based Oskar Blues Brewery—Motto: Drink Beer, Ride Bikes, Repeat. Brevard offers easy access to and Dupont State Recreation Area and Pisgah National Forest, home to over 100 miles of miles of singletrack for bikers, hikers, and trail runners, along with nearby Looking Glass Rock as a prime climbing destination.Waterfalls abound in this neck of the woods; Brevard and Transylvania County are known as the Land of Waterfalls. Also popular are trout fishing and tubing on the Davidson River, which flows just north of town. In addition to prime hiking trails and backpacking opportunities, Pisgah and Dupont offer entrance to hundreds of miles of world-class single track. As a result, Brevard has become a star on the national mountain biking scene.Cudas_IB_0814_2Vote now at blueridgeoutdoors.com!last_img read more

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first_imgBy Dialogo February 28, 2011 Colombian criminal gangs linked to former paramilitary groups drove a 40 percent rise in massacres in 2010, slaughtering human rights activists, public officials and civilians, the United Nations said on 23 February. The Andean nation is the world’s No. 1 cocaine producer, and multiple illegal armed groups are all engaged in the drug trade — including demobilized, former members of Colombia’s right-wing paramilitary groups. New criminal bands, known by their Spanish acronym “Bacrim,” are widely seen as the new, emerging threat in Colombia, and sprung up to fill the void left by the traditional cartels dismantled by a U.S.-backed drug war. “There was a rise in massacres by 40 percent last year although (the criminal gangs) weren’t the only ones, they had a lot to do with it,” said Christian Salazar, representative for the U.N. human rights office in Colombia. “In addition, these groups have the power to corrupt and infiltrate the state … these groups are a strong threat to the rule of law,” Salazar told reporters. The U.N. rights office, citing government figures, said at least 179 people were massacred in 38 different incidents last year compared with 139 people in 27 massacres in 2009. U.S. authorities say they are trying to crack down on criminal gangs in Colombia that are running cocaine to Mexican drug kingpins who are at war with Mexico’s security forces. The six main Colombian criminal gangs are usually alliances of former members of outlawed paramilitary groups who began a demobilization process in 2003 and remnants of the traditional crime syndicates.last_img read more

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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Nassau County police have stepped up security at the Long Island Marathon (Michael Damm)Running events have seen more participation on Long Island in recent years with more creative events surfacing rather than the usual 5K, 10K, half-marathon and marathon races, participants and organizers say.Since these events are breaking the mold, a broader audience is joining the running community. Runners USA reported there were almost 14 million finishers of running events nationwide last year, about double what it was a decade ago. That may be in part because unique events appeal to more individuals and substitute competitiveness with fun.“Instead of thinking about time or beating someone you work as a group to get through the zombie challenges and help everyone out,” said Danielle Halikias, recent finisher of a Zombie run. “It is really easy to make friends there.”Typical 5Ks are no longer just a 3.1 mile run. They are 3.1 miles of challenging teamwork through mud and obstacles.The Zombie 5K run, which includes running away from the undead while testing various forms of athletic strength, and 15K Mud Run are among the newest editions to LI’s running events. Last week at Belmont Raceway Park in Elmont was the Run 2 Glow, in which participants run through glow tents powered with UV Blacklights.Events like these make it easy for people to shed their stress, be a part of something big and meet new people in a healthy atmosphere.“We see these booms whenever economic times are tough,” said Dejan Popovic, the marketing and communications manager at Runner’s Edge in Farmingdale. “People turn to health and wellness as a way to feel good about themselves.”Registration for these events is easy online and most 5K and 10K races range from $15-30, about the same as eating out at a restaurant. Although the race ends at the finish line, the money raised often extends farther by helping a local charity.Brendan, from the Sayville Running Company, said the Run to the Brewery donated $15,000 to charity earlier this year.“The amounts donated to charities could range from $25,000 down to $2,500,” said Terry Bisogno, a professional announcer of LI racing events.The most popular/unique running events on Long Island  1. The Diva Half Marathon Oct 62.  LI Macarthur Airport 5k Veterans Run June 13. Run 2 Glow June 294. Runner’s Edge 5k Women’s Run July 135. Belmont Stakes Blue Ribbon 5k June 26. Sayville Running Company Run to the Brewery 10 miles Jan. 197. Long Island Marathon Weekend (Full, Half, 10K, 5K) May 4-58. Riverhead Zombie 5K run and 15k mud run Sept. 89. New Years Eve Dash January 110. Cow Harbor Run Sept. 21Popular running trails on Long Island1. Stillwell Woods Mountain Bike Trail in Syosset2. Bethpage State Park, Bethpage & Massapequa Park3.Jones Beach State Park along Ocean Pkwy4. Cedar creek park in Seaford to Jones beach5. Sunken Meadow Park6. Rocky Point Mountain Bike Trail7. Shelter Island trailslast_img read more

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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 25-year-old Miller Place woman was killed in a two-vehicle crash in Coram early Sunday morning.Suffolk County police said Linzie Davis was driving a Nissan sedan westbound on Middle Country Road when her vehicle was involved in a collision with a pickup truck near the corner of Fife Drive at 12:12 a.m.Davis was pronounced dead at the scene. The other driver, 17-year-old Bryan Gregory of Yaphank, was taken to Stony Brook University Hospital for treatment of non-life-threatening injuries.Sixth Squad detectives impounded the vehicles, are continuing the investigation and ask anyone with information on this crash to call them at 631-854-8652. All calls will remain confidential.last_img read more

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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Iconic rappers with roots on Long Island along with veteran hip hop heavyweights to hit the stage at NYCB Theatre at WestburyThe word “legendary” is thrown around in hip hop a bit too often. Hip hop has many participants worthy of bombastic titles like pioneer, architect, Grandmaster and Godfather, but in its music, the word “legendary” can only be applied to the few, and in terms of performances, rarely do such artists appear together.However, the NYCB Theatre at Westbury will serve as truly hallowed ground as some of hip hop’s true veteran heavyweights will appear together at the Legends of the Fall concert on Saturday, October 4. The event will feature Rakim, Big Daddy Kane, Slick Rick, Doug E. Fresh and Biz Markie, each a titan in his own right, and together, an Avengers-like collective of rap royalty.Long Island native and widely accepted “God Emcee” Rakim will deliver the rugged-but-intricate rhymes that made him a truly ranformative artist in the genre, cementing his role atop “top 5” lists of greatest rap orators. His seminal Paid In Full album is widely considered one of the genres’ finest works, and his connection to the Island has always been a source of pride, for Rakim and fans alike.Equally celebrated in the annals of rap history is Brooklyn wordsmith Big Daddy Kane. One of hip hop’s greatest, both stylistically and lyrically, Kane set the bar for rapid-fire delivery, expanding the depth of what rap could say and how it could be said. Coupled with a smooth demeanor and a variety of subject matter, Big Daddy Kane certainly sits perched atop hip hop’s proverbial Mt. Rushmore.Big Daddy Kane Performing at the 40th Anniversary of Hip Hop Event in NYC’s Central Park (Photo: Manny Faces / Birthplace Magazine)Slick Rick and Doug E. Fresh rose to rap prominence together with their undisputed classics “Lodi Dodi” and “The Show,” and have gone on to create equally classic material as solo artists. Often performing apart, to see both on the same bill promises the possibility of witnessing those crowd favorites being performed by one of rap’s most appreciated duos.Biz Markie, who also has Long Island roots, is an artist in a class by himself. A prolific beatboxer, DJ and rapper known for his sense of humor, Biz Markie has one song that is instantly recognized world-wide. When Biz drops the commanding “Youuu!” at the chorus of his piano-laden classic track “Just A Friend,” the resulting “GOT WHAT I NEEEEED” singalong will assuredly be emphatic, and complete.Visit the NYCB Theatre at Westbury on Saturday, October 4 to be transported back to the “Golden Era” of hip hop, when lyricism, originality and charisma were first and foremost.last_img read more

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first_imgIn part 2 of our chat with Filene’s Research Director Ben Rogers, we shed a little light on how vital it is to the success of a credit union to have a Board renewal strategy — which ultimately can have a positive (have one) or negative (don’t have one) impact on the organization. Just about everything is affected by the Board from leadership to lending to technology and much, much more. continue reading » ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img

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