October 16, 2019
  • 6:41 pm A look at this years Amazing Race Canada contestants
  • 8:52 am Harvey Weinstein lawyers seek to publicly identify Ontario woman behind lawsuit
  • 8:33 am AT VANCOUVER WEBFEST 2018 UBCPACTRA Presents … Working with Professional Performers How
  • 8:27 am TORONTO CRITICS HAIL ANTHROPOCENE THE HUMAN EPOCH DIRECTORS JENNIFER BAICHWAL EDWARD BURTYNSKY
  • 3:48 am Aglukkaqs election infrastructure promises fading over time

first_imgBy Bill Brioux – The Canadian Press Korey Sam, 31, and Ivana Krunic, 30, friends and co-workers from Toronto, both work as personal trainers. While they’ve dated friends they’ve never dated each other. “Which is good,” says Ivana, who was born in Bosnia and lived in Germany as a child. “If Korey looks at another girl, I’m not going to be, ‘Later.’ I’ll be, ‘She’s cute.’ It’s platonic but it’s great. There’s no tension.” LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Kenneth McAlpine, 25, and Ryan LaChapelle, 25, best friends from Collingwood, Ont., who call themselves Team Give’r. “That’s us,” says Kenneth. “We give’r all we got, full commitment, 100 per cent.” These two well-travelled surfer dudes will be easy to spot in their Hawaiian shirts. Think of them as mellower, sober Trailer Park Boys. CLICK THE PICS FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION ABOUT EACH TEAM Good thing one of the teams competing this summer are undertakers. Megan Burden, 23, and Courtney Roberts, 21, small town cousins with no filter from St. Lunaire-Griquet and Corner Brook, Nfld. It’s win the “Amazing Race” or bust for Megan, who, when asked what she’d do with the grand prize money, answers without hesitation: “I’m probably going to buy fake boobs. It’s something I’ve wanted since I was 10.” “Yes, we are running in our suits,” says Deb, 54, who insists she has a fun job. “People come in grieving and for some reason I get them laughing.” Among the other teams: Dan Kipnis, 23, and Riya Malik, 23, friends and YouTube stars from Richmond Hill, Ont. The two have been best friends since Dan offered to ride a ski lift with new girl Riya on a Grade 4 class trip. Their “Dan & Riya” YouTube channel deals with pop culture and millennial life, with one video recently passing the 14 million views mark. “We try to make the race harder every year,” says executive producer John Brunton, who feels the new cast truly represents all of Canada. “They’re going to remind viewers of themselves, or of their sons or daughters, older sisters or whoever. Relatability is the key.” Among them are Deb and Aaron Baker, a mother and son team from the B.C. border town of Grand Forks. The two funeral directors refer to each other as “last responders.” They should be easy to spot during the competition: both plan to wear their dark blue funeral attire throughout the entire race. Advertisementcenter_img Facebook Karen Richards, 31, and Bert Richards, 36, a married couple from Edmonton, Alta., tried to get on “Family Feud” — they used the game show theme as their wedding song! — until they found out Canadians weren’t eligible. “The Amazing Race Canada” is probably a better fit anyway, with Bert in the delivery business. He’ll drive and Karen will give forewarning “three streets before.” Login/Register With: Zed Dhalla, 27, and Shabbir Dhalla, 57, a father and son team from Vancouver. Zed’s the big “Race” fan, but Shabbir wanted to compete “because I’ve only got a few more years left on these legs.” Dad is also a stage 3 cancer survivor. “It was very much a blessing in disguise,” says Shabbir. “I look at life completely differently now.” Canada’s most-watched homegrown summer series returns for a fifth season on July 4 on CTV. The network has just announced the 10 teams from all across Canada who will be competing for the grand prize, which includes $250,000, two compact SUVs, and a trip around the world for two. Deb is the second oldest contestant this summer, as teams get younger and stronger. Advertisement Sam Lambert, 25, and Paul Mitskopoulos, 24, a dating couple from Toronto. “We’ve both always been huge fans of the show, starting with the American version, watching every week with our families,” says Paul, who met Sam on a dating app almost two years ago. “It’s been love ever since.” Andrea Croxen, 29, and Ebonie Roberge, 29, friends and business partners from Montreal, are ex-models who met when they were 16 at a bridal fashion show. “This is really a year of taking risks for us,” says Ebonie. The pair just launched their own business running fitness retreats in Costa Rica last year. Adam Cavaleri, 29, and Andrea Cavaleri, 28, a brother and sister team from Montreal. “I applied three years ago with my best friend,” says graphic designer Andrea. They didn’t get picked and the friend wasn’t available this year so her bartender brother stepped up. There’s always a chance a new season of “The Amazing Race Canada” could end in a dead heat. Twitterlast_img read more

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first_imgHarvey Weinstein, shown in 2011, faces dozens of allegations of sexual abuse and harassment, including from some of the biggest names in Hollywood. (John Carucci/Associated Press) Advertisement Login/Register With: Advertisement LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisementcenter_img Her lawyers have said they want to move ahead with the claim without using her name, arguing that identifying her would cause irreparable harm to her mental health and well-being.An affidavit filed in court said she may not continue with the case if she must use her name.READ MORE Lawyers for Harvey Weinstein are seeking to publicly identify an Ontario actress who has filed a sexual assault lawsuit against the disgraced Hollywood producer.A Toronto court is set to hear arguments on Feb. 9, and the outcome could determine whether the lawsuit proceeds.The woman has been granted anonymity by the court for the time being. Facebook Twitterlast_img read more

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first_imgRob LyonsSuper CreativeRob Lyons is a Vancouver born producer/director, president of Super Creative and a brand ambassador for Panasonic Lumix cameras. Rob has been making web series since 2006 in a variety of roles and is currently the Executive Producer and Cinematographer of House Call with Dr. Yvette Lu, a new show that aims to provide practical solutions for caregivers across Canada. Advertisement Twitter Advertisement Joel McCarthyDirector/WriterJoel is a multi-award winning director/writer who has now completed two feature feature films, multiple short films and two popular web-series. Joel most known for his feature films; Taking My Parents to Burning Man; (feature documentary) ‘Shooting the Musical’ (controversial comedic film) as well as the short films & Why Does God Hate Me?; “I Love You So Much It’s Killing Them”. Most recently his semi-autobiographical web-series; Inconceivable; was nominated for the very prestigious Gotham Independent Film Award for & ;Breakout Short Series. Currently Joel is working as a directing teacher at Vancouver Film School, and developing Inconceivable as a long form episodic and a new feature film. Login/Register With: Troy MundleActor / Director / Producer / WriterOriginally from the East Coast, Vancouver Web Fest alumn Troy Mundle is an actor, writer and filmmaker who has created, produced and acted in several projects under the UBCP ULB program: most notably Single & Dating In Vancouver, an Award winning, 14-time nominated, Internationally screened comedy webseries that took him to France in 2016; Ghost Unit, a new action-crime drama currently being pitched to networks; and La Buena, a short-film entering the film festival circuit and recently admitted into the 2018 Cannes Short Film Corner. In addition to filmmaking, Troy enjoys long walks on the beach and swiping left on Tinder.CLICK HERE TO PURCHASE YOUR PASScenter_img Advertisement Facebook Hear from a diverse panel of filmmakers about their experiences with professional performers, how it benefited their productions and the ins and outs of working with the union. Lisa PurdyNotio MediaLisa Purdy is an experienced media executive who has worked in creative development, funding, production, broadcast, digital product development, business development, brand, marketing and content distribution. She has played a leadership role in her close to 30 years in media in Canada. She founded Notio Media in 2017 to produce and consult on digital media projects and initiatives.Formerly Director of Knowledge Kids, part of British Columbia’s Knowledge Network, and the Director of BBC Kids, a national specialty channel, Lisa has also worked for CBC Television and the 2010 Olympic Winter Games.Recent projects include co-producing the scripted web series SPIRAL for TELUS and under the Notio Media banner, working with a range of clients – from tech companies to film festivals – on strategy and analysis. Lisa is also working on a start-up for live performances. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment last_img read more

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first_img Twitter Advertisement Login/Register With: LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement Facebook Advertisement As runners-up, Maison du bonheur director Sofia Bohdanowicz (who won last year’s Stella Artois Jay Scott Prize for an emerging artist) and Ava director Sadaf Foroughi each received $5,000 from Rogers Communications.Hosted by TIFF Artistic Director and Co-Head Cameron Bailey, the ceremony took place at a gala dinner held January 8, 2019 at the Four Seasons Hotel in Toronto with a cocktail reception sponsored by Cineplex Entertainment.“All of the films honoured by the TFCA this year prompt us to think about the human condition and to reflect on the footprint we leave upon the planet,” said TFCA president Peter Howell. “But ANTHROPOCENE: The Human Epoch does so with life-changing authority. It’s a clarion call to action, one that I hope leaves these awards to find a global reach and response.”“This year’s three nominated films speak to the extraordinary range and international outlook of Canadian cinema,” said Rogers Vice-Chair, Philip B. Lind. “ANTHROPOCENE: The Human Epoch presents a vision of environmental ruin on an unprecedented scale, with a profound and disturbing beauty. It’s a literal landmark and we are thrilled to celebrate its unique achievement.”At the gala, Grace Lynn Kung (Frankie Drake Mysteries) and Jess Salgueiro (Mouthpiece) introduced a series of video acceptance speeches from winners, including Best Director Alfonso Cuarón (Roma), Best Actor Ethan Hawke (First Reformed), Best Supporting Actress Regina King (If Beale Street Could Talk) and Best Supporting Actor Steven Yeun (Burning).Rick Mercer presented the $5,000 RBC Allan King Documentary Film Award for Won’t You Be My Neighbor? Morgan Neville’s affectionate look at the legacy reaching beyond the small screen neighbourhood created by TV’s Mr. Rogers.Canadian television personality Traci Melchor presented writer-director Molly McGlynn with the $10,000 Stella Artois Jay Scott Prize for an emerging artist.In its mission to recognize new voices in film criticism, the TFCA gave Genevieve Citron the inaugural TFCA Emerging Critic Award. Citron is the creator and lead editor of The Film Atlas website.Prolific actor Tantoo Cardinal was presented with the Technicolor Clyde Gilmour Award by actress Tanaya Beatty (Through Black Spruce). Under the pay-it-forward terms of the award, Technicolor donated $50,000 in services to a filmmaker of Cardinal’s choosing — writer-director and video artist Darlene Naponse, whose film Falls Around Her, starring Cardinal, had its world premiere at TIFF 2018.Richard Crouse, host of the CTV talk show Pop Life, welcomed prominent members of the film industry, civic and culture community on the red carpet, including producer J. Miles Dale, whose The Shape of Water won the Academy Award for Best Picture last year, producer-director Miranda de Pencier, producer-director Charles Officer, producer-director Barry Avrich, actors Tanaya Beatty, Kawennáhere Devery Jacobs, Clark Johnson, Michaela Kurimsky, Grace Lynn Kung and Jess Salgueiro, Telefilm executive director Christa Dickenson, TIFF co-head Joana Vicente, Beth Janson, CEO of the Academy of Canadian Cinema & Television, Hussain Amarshi, founder and CEO of Mongrel Media and Toronto Mayor John Tory.The TFCA is extremely grateful to founding sponsor Rogers Communications for the Rogers Best Canadian Film Award, to returning sponsors Labatt’s for the Stella Artois Jay Scott Prize for an emerging artist, to Technicolor for the Technicolor Clyde Gilmour Award, to Cineplex Entertainment for the awards cocktail reception. The TFCA welcomes new sponsors Air Canada as the official airline and RBC for the RBC Allan King Documentary Award. The TFCA also welcomes new sponsors the Four Seasons Hotel and Champagne Perrier-Jouët. The TFCA salutes stalwart supporters The Globe and Mail, Maclean’s, Zoomer Magazine, and TAXI Toronto.(Under the TFCA’s guidelines, contenders eligible for the awards include films released in Canada in 2018 plus films that qualify for the 2018 Oscars and have Canadian distribution scheduled by the end of February 2019.)The Toronto Film Critics Association was established in 1997 and is comprised of Toronto based journalists and broadcasters who specialize in film criticism and commentary.  All major dailies, weeklies and a variety of other print, electronic and web outlets are represented. Members of the TFCA also participate in the Federation of International Film Critics (FIPRESCI).  As such, they have sat on juries at festivals in Cannes, Berlin, Venice, Toronto, Montreal, Miami, Palm Springs, Chicago, Pusan, Moscow, Amsterdam, London and Vienna, among others.Website: www.torontofilmcritics.comTwitter: @TFCAHashtag: #TFCA2019 TORONTO – ANTHROPOCENE: The Human Epoch, a dramatic exploration of humankind’s devastating impact on environmental change, has won the Toronto Film Critics Association’s 2018 Rogers Best Canadian Film Award.The award, the richest annual film prize in Canada, was presented to Jennifer Baichwal and Nicholas de Pencier by writer-director Don McKellar, whose Last Night was named the TFCA’s Best Canadian Film in 1998.It was Baichwal’s third trip to the TFCA podium, previously winning Best Canadian Film forManufactured Landscapes in 2006 and the 2013 Rogers Best Canadian Film prize (with Burtynsky) for Watermark.last_img read more

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first_imgAPTN National NewsWhat a difference two years can make.In 2012, when Leona Aglukkaq was running for the job of MP for Nunavut, she had a long list of infrastructure projects she wanted pushed through.It seems those promises have faded over time.APTN National News reporter Kent Driscoll has this story.last_img

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first_imgBy Jorge BarreraAPTN National NewsAn Akwesasne man facing charges in connection with a human smuggling case recently trumpeted by the Conservative government says the Nigerian network allegedly behind the underground operation has put a hit out on his life.Seth Lazore, 28, says he discovered the threat against his life while incarcerated in the Ottawa provincial jail following his arrest. Lazore said he was told the individuals who wanted to kill him were linked to the network allegedly involved in smuggling a Nigerian family of five into Canada through the U.S.The RCMP announced on Sept. 6 that Lazore and another Akwesasne man, Oren Lazore, 21, along with two men from Brampton, Ont., Emmanuel Omoghan, 46, and Felix Omoghan, 66, had been charged following a three month human smuggling investigation involving several police forces – from Toronto to Akwesasne – and border agencies in Canada and the U.S.The charges drew the attention of Public Safety Minister Vic Toews and Immigration Minister Jason Kenney. They issued a joint statement praising authorities for the arrests.The federal Conservative government has made cracking down on human smuggling a priority of their tough-on-crime agenda which features legislation that will impose mandatory minimum sentences on human trafficking convictions later this year.APTN National News has learned that the family -a mother, father and three children-travelled originally from Nigeria to Italy and then to the U.S. before they were allegedly taken into Canada by boat across the St. Lawrence River to Cornwall, Ont.The family was allegedly in contact with a Nigerian network which was involved in arranging their passage across the Canada-U.S. border.Lazore told APTN National News the family was in Chicago before they attempted to enter Canada.The RCMP would not comment on the case or confirm the nationality of the family.The Mohawk territory of Akwesasne sits about 120 kilometres west of Montreal and straddles the Ontario, Quebec and Canada-U.S. borders.Given its geography and the fierce nationalism of the Mohawks, the region has developed into a main corridor for smuggling for tobacco and guns going north and marijuana heading south.While he was in custody at the Ottawa-Carleton Detention Centre, Lazore said he was told inmates in the jail were looking to kill him at the request of the network. While he had protection inside, Lazore said he took the threat seriously and said fear forced him to turn down a jail-house meeting with an APTN National News reporter at the last moment.Lazore said he quickly left the Cornwall, Ont., courthouse after his release following a bail hearing last Wednesday over worries a member of the network was in the courtroom.Lazore, who is a father of three children, was released after the mother of his long-term girlfriend put up a $1,500 surety and $5,000 bond. He was ordered into house arrest until the case comes to its conclusion. His conditions allowed him to find work and he recently found a job on a construction site.Lazore, who was raised by a single mother, grew up in and around Akwesasne and cared for his grandfather, Hubert Lazore, until the 87 year-old was felled by a stroke, said the charges against him should be tossed.All he did, he said, was help a family travel through Mohawk territory.“I didn’t do nothing wrong in my eyes and I’m sure in a lot of other’s eyes, just helping a family out get into Canada,” said Lazore, in the backyard of the Akwesasne home where he’s been ordered to live. “I don’t even think there is a border there…This is our land, this is the Mohawks’ land…The way I look at it, there ain’t no boundaries and borders around here.”He said the family was trying to escape a miserable situation in Chicago and get into Canada where they hoped to reunite with extended family and start a new life.“They were living a horrible life in Chicago,” he said. “They were saying they were getting their paycheques taking from them and everything out there, they were working basically for free. They were living on…maybe $100 a week…they were talking about coming to Canada, starting a new life, they would get loans or whatever.”During his bail hearing, Lazore was overcome by emotions at one point when he believed he’d be heading back to the provincial jail. Lazore said the Ottawa jail is worse than the U.S. federal penitentiary he spent 27 months in following a plea agreement on a 2004 indictment on marijuana distribution.“The way they got that place set up, it’s like the max. They have it set up almost as if you were a serial killer, almost as if you did a heinous crime and some people are only in there on little charges,” he said. “I don’t wish that up on anybody to go up in there….tension is tight in there, real tight.”Now Lazore, whose next court appearance is set for Sept. 25, says he’s trying to spend as much time as he can with his family in case another prison term locks down his future.“I am in a bad position right now, really bad position,” he said.jbarrear@aptn.calast_img read more

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first_imgAPTN National NewsSome major sports organizations are coming under fire for using ethnic terms in team names like the Washington Redskins NFL team.In Canada, as APTN’s Keith Laboucan reports, some people the CFL’s Edmonton Eskimos should consider making a name change.last_img

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first_imgAPTN National NewsThe Saskatchewan government is trying to make up some of the shortfall in funding for Aboriginal education.Officials there say they need skilled Aboriginal workers to help meet the shortfalls in provincial employment.But as APTN’s Larissa Burnouf reports, the provincial government also says it’s waiting for the feds to do their part.last_img

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first_imgAPTN National NewsThe Neskonlith Indian Band in British Columbia has issued an eviction notice to the mining company responsible for last week’s massive tailings pond breach before a similar mine is developed on their land.Chief Judy Wilson says Imperial Metals, through its subsidiary Ruddock Creek Mining,  is seeking approval for a mine in their territory but accuse the company of failing to protect lands and point to the Mount Polley tailings pond breach Aug 4.“(Mount Polley) could have been prevented if Imperial Metals had proper risk assessment and management practices in place; and the provincial and federal governments had properly assessed and monitored the mining operation,” says Wilson in a statement.The Secwepemc is made up of 17 First Nations.Wilson says they have a responsibility to protect their land and waters.“Our people made a declaration opposing the Ruddock Creek mine and held water ceremonies to protect our water and salmon. Our council stands with our elders and people, we oppose the proposed Ruddock Creek mine by Imperial Metals and hereby evict Imperial Metals from our territory,” she says.” If Imperial Metals does not comply, Neskonlith will also block access to the Ruddock Creek Mine to ensure it is closed indefinitely.”last_img read more

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first_imgTrina Roache APTN National NewsIn New Brunswick – a small Maliseet community celebrated national Aboriginal Day with a book launch.The book was decades in the making – and it’s one that could challenge how Canadian copyright law looks at oral storytelling.last_img

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first_imgJohn MurrayAPTN InvestigatesDarla Contois woke up one morning and her left side was completely numb.The 18-year-old actor and writer from a remote community in northern Manitoba said when she shook her own hand, it felt like a stranger’s.She continued her morning routine thinking it would pass, until her mother, Crystal Cook, asked her to smile.She couldn’t smile, and her numbness was increasing.Alarmed, the pair went to the Garden Hill nursing station where she was told not to worry, it was just Bell’s Palsy, a medical condition where muscle control on one side of the face is lost. The condition usually goes away on its own after a couple of weeks.But at a follow-up, she was told by a city doctor she was anaemic.That was until a CAT scan six years later for an unrelated incident revealed she’d had a stroke.Ironically, suffering a stroke at such a young age may have been fortunate.“I’m very lucky because the stroke that I had when I was 18 because I had it when I was so young means that my brain was sort of able to regenerate itself a little bit better than it would have if I was older,” she said. “So there are no effects from the stroke.”She said this is normal health care for her family in the north.Her grandparents had to move to the city from Misipawistik Cree Nation to get adequate care for their diabetes, and an uncle wasn’t so fortunate.“My uncle actually passed away because he went to the nursing station with chest pains and they sent him home. On the way home he had a heart attack and passed away,” she said, adding It was a devastating loss for her.She has since learned she has a congenital heart disorder that needs surgery.“It’s very nerve-wracking. Like I never thought at 25 years old, I’d have to have heart surgery,” she said.She wonders what would have happened if she had remained unaware of the condition.She said she has been subject to racism and stereotyping in healthcare. She encountered racist stereotypes.“Sometimes I feel our communities back home, they’re just used to it. They hear it all the time,” she said. “That’s normal. Whatever. Just let it fall off your back. Doesn’t mean anything.”Contois said she feels normalizing these stereotypes is detrimental to the community.“But when this is affecting people’s lives and it’s affecting the way health care professionals do their job, then it’s really hurting us in the end.”Contois can’t say whether racial stereotyping or just a lack of resources caused the missed diagnosis. But either way, she said, the system needs to improve how it serves remote First Nations.“I don’t know how to deal with the fact that I had a stroke. And there is like emotional and psychological damage from that,” she said. “And I have a hard time trusting doctors and the health care system now.”jmurray@aptn.calast_img read more

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first_imgTORONTO – Canada’s largest real-estate trust says it’s planning to sell about $2 billion worth of properties — primarily open-air malls or power centres — in secondary markets across the country.RioCan Real Estate Investment Trust (TSX:REI.UN) expects to net about $1.5 billion after expenses from the sale of about 100 properties by late 2018 or 2019, with exact details yet to be revealed.About half of the net proceeds will be used to repurchase RioCan trust units from the open market.RioCan also plans to invest $300 million to $400 million per year on property development in the six major markets that already account for about 75 per cent of its annual rental revenue.RioCan chief executive Edward Sonshine told analysts that its properties in secondary markets generally have less growth potential than its holdings in Toronto, Montreal, Ottawa, Calgary, Edmonton and Vancouver.“We have always known that the best assets, from a growth perspective, are located where there’s population growth,” Sonshine said Monday during a conference call with analysts.“In Canada, that population growth is essentially in the six major markets of this country.”Although Sonshine said RioCan won’t be revealing the exact list of properties until individual deals are reached, he said that many of them will be in Ontario and Quebec, with a smaller number in Atlantic Canada, Alberta and British Columbia.Among the communities he identified as potential markets for sales were London, Ont., and smaller Ontario communities such as Collingwood, Renfrew, and Leamington.He also said that Orillia, Ont., is home to a RioCan property with a vacant space formerly occupied by Target.However, Sonshine said RioCan is flexible about what it sells and will keep some of its secondary market properties, including one in Barrie, Ont., that is part of a joint venture with Hudson’s Bay Co. (TSX:HBC).The B.C. capital of Victoria also has a property that RioCan will likely hold onto because of its potential for growth, he said.As for the plan to buy back some of RioCan’s equity, Sonshine said it made sense because of the relatively low market value of its units.RioCan units were at $24.10 at mid-day on the Toronto Stock Exchange, little changed since Friday and well off their 2017 closing high of $27.08 on Jan. 6.last_img read more

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first_imgTOKYO – YouTube said Thursday it has punished well-known blogger Logan Paul over a video that appeared to show a body hanging in a Japanese forest that is said to be a suicide spot.The company said in a statement that it has removed Paul’s channels from Google Preferred and will not feature him in the new season of the web series “Foursome.” It said his new video blogs are also on hold.Paul earlier announced he was stepping away from posting videos “to reflect” following an outcry when he uploaded images of the apparent body and his reaction to finding it in the forest.YouTube prohibits violent or gory content posted in a shocking, sensational or disrespectful manner, the company says. It issued a “strike” against Paul’s channel for violating its community guidelines after the posting.The video was viewed some 6 million times before being removed from Paul’s YouTube channel, a verified account with more than 15 million subscribers.A storm of criticism followed despite two apologies, with commenters saying Paul seemed disrespectful and that his initial apology was inadequate.Google Preferred’s advertising program aggregates top YouTube content for advertisers to buy time on them.last_img read more

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first_imgRENO, Nev. – The head of one of the nation’s largest fish conservation groups says Fiat Chrysler’s Super Bowl ads “glorified” the destruction of aquatic habitat in an apparent attempt to appeal to off-road thrill-seekers.It’s the second time ads by the automaker have drawn complaints since the Feb. 4 game.Trout Unlimited President and CEO Chris Wood said Wednesday that one ad gave the impression a Jeep Cherokee was splashing down the middle of a wild streambed.Fiat Chrysler is defending the ads but says there are no plans to run them again. It says the spot with the Cherokee was shot on a flooded county road and another with a Jeep Wrangler was filmed in a man-made lake with a man-made waterfall on private land.Wood said many of his group’s 300,000 members and supporters own Jeeps, but the images were upsetting.“Fish are tough and resilient critters, but they don’t do well with several-thousand-pound vehicles driving over their spawning grounds, tearing up the gravel where they lay eggs,” he said. “Why someone would want to put out the idea that you should buy a Jeep so you could drive it up a creek is incomprehensible to me.”The Reno Gazette-Journal first reported the ad flap last week. Pam Harrington, Trout Unlimited’s Nevada field co-ordinator, told the newspaper she was upset because she’s worked with ATV clubs in Idaho repairing damage caused by irresponsible drivers.Stream habitat improvements are part of the decadeslong efforts to protect endangered salmon in the Pacific Northwest, where research shows riverbank disturbances and sedimentation chokes off fish eggs.Wood said he didn’t learn until this week that much of his membership was upset over the Jeep ads. He said he had already written a personal letter of complaint Feb. 6 to Fiat Chrysler CEO and Chairman Sergio Marchionne after Wood’s son noticed the ad during the game.The automaker also came under fire last week for another Super Bowl ad featuring a Ram pickup set against audio of “The Drum Major Instinct” sermon delivered by Martin Luther King Jr. 50 years ago.The 60-second spot included images of the truck with people helping others and hugging loved ones. Critics said it omitted King’s words in the same speech guarding against advertisers exploiting consumers, including when the civil rights icon said, “In order to make your neighbours envious you must drive this type of car. … And you know, before you know it, you’re just buying that stuff. That’s the way advertisers do it.”A company spokeswoman said that ad “was selling the message of serving in your community.”Wood, who worked as chief spokesman for the U.S. Forest Service under the Clinton administration before joining Trout Unlimited in 2001, said Fiat Chrysler apparently “got some bad marketing advice” on the Jeep campaign.He said there are plans to connect with a Jeep branch representative for a “broader conversation.”“Hopefully something good will come of this, and we can begin a dialogue with Jeep to promote smart use of off-road vehicles as well as conservation of natural resources,” Wood said.last_img read more

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first_imgTORONTO – The Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce set the tone for banks’ earnings season with a dividend hike and better-than-expected first-quarter net income, helped by a boost in earnings in its U.S. division as it looks to expand south of the border amidst slowing mortgage growth at home.Canada’s fifth-largest lender said Thursday it continues to see benefits from the purchase of Chicago-based The PrivateBank, which CIBC acquired in June 2017 and rebranded in September as CIBC Bank USA. As part of its strategy to ramp up its U.S. presence, it also purchased Chicago-based wealth management firm Geneva Advisors for roughly US$200 million last year.“With a second full quarter’s contribution from CIBC Bank USA, we continue to perform well and deliver against our commitment to build client relationships north and south of the border,” CIBC chief executive Victor Dodig told analysts on a conference call.In the latest quarter, CIBC’s U.S. commercial banking and wealth management division reported net income of $134 million in the latest quarter, up $105 million from the same period in 2017, contributing to a more than 22 per cent increase in adjusted net income year-over-year despite slowing mortgage growth.It’s a welcome sign for the bank, which has a larger domestic exposure than its peers and mortgages — demand for which is expected to slow under new tighter rules — also represent a bigger chunk of its loan book, said Shannon Stemm, an analyst with Edward Jones in St. Louis.“They’re working to try to diversify themselves away from their domestic banking, and seeing some good early results with growth in the U.S. business that they recently acquired. … It’s going to take some time before the U.S. is going to be a meaningful offset to potential slowdown in Canada,” she said.CIBC was the first of Canada’s big lenders to report results for the quarter ended Jan. 31, kicking off the season by raising its quarterly payment to common shareholders by three cents to $1.33 per share — even as it reported a decline in profit attributable to shareholders, which amounted to nearly $1.31 billion, down from $1.39 billion a year ago.However on an adjusted basis, the bank said it earned a record $1.41 billion or $3.18 per diluted share for the quarter, up from $1.15 billion or $2.89 per share a year earlier. Analysts had expected an adjusted profit of $2.83 per share, according to Thomson Reuters.Industry watchers were also eyeing CIBC’s results for early signs of the impact of recent changes to the banking landscape, such as stricter rules surrounding uninsured mortgages as of Jan. 1. Canada’s biggest banks have cautioned that the federal financial services regulator’s revised qualifying rules — requiring would-be homebuyers with a down payment larger than 20 per cent to prove they can continue to service their mortgage if interest rates rise — could present a headwind to loan originations.Demand for mortgages in December saw an uptick, with national sales up 4.5 per cent according to the Canadian Real Estate Association, as buyers scrambled to snap up homes before Jan. 1.CIBC’s mortgage balances for the fiscal first quarter were $203 billion, up 9.1 per cent from $186 billion a year earlier. In comparison, the bank saw a more than 12 per cent jump in mortgage growth from $166 billion in the first quarter of 2016. Originations of Canadian uninsured residential mortgages for the quarter were $9 billion, down from $12 billion a year ago.Christina Kramer, CIBC’s group head of personal and small business banking for Canada, said it is too early to gauge the extent of the impact of the mortgage underwriting rules, as well as the January interest rate hike.“We saw some pull forward in November and December, so January itself is not a good indication alone,” she told analysts. “So early days, we’re not seeing any big change to customer behaviour.”The lender’s Canadian personal and small banking arm reported net income of $656 million for the period, down $149 million or 19 per cent compared with a year ago. However, on an adjusted basis, net income was $658 million, up $97 million or 17 per cent from a year ago.Net income for the domestic commercial banking and wealth management division was $314 million, up 14 per cent compared with a year earlier. Its capital markets net income was $322 million for the quarter, down $25 million or seven per cent from a year earlier.Dodig has estimated that CIBC’s U.S. business will account for 17 per cent of its earnings by 2020, up from nine per cent for the four-month period it owned PrivateBancorp in fiscal 2017. The bank’s results included charges totalling 23 cents per share, including an $88-million net tax adjustment due to a cut to the U.S. corporate tax rate from 35 per cent to 21 per cent that took effect this year.Several of Canada’s biggest lenders have indicated they expect to record a write down to reduce the value of deferred tax assets already held on company balance sheets as a result of tax changes under U.S. President Donald Trump, but expect a lift to earnings in the long term.CIBC was also the first of the Canadian banks to report its earnings after the introduction of a new accounting standard known as IFRS 9 that puts more emphasis over expected losses over the life of a loan compared to previous guidelines. In turn, provisions for credit losses, or the amount of money set aside for bad loans, may be more volatile — and will also make it difficult to make year-over-year comparisons in this and coming quarters, analysts say.John Aiken, an analyst with Barclays in Toronto, said the new standard helped CIBC in the latest quarter, with provisions for credit losses dropping to $153 million from $212 million a year ago.“(This volatility) was evidenced with the first bank out of the gates, but actually benefited CIBC with recoveries reported in the quarter,” Aiken wrote in a note to clients.last_img read more

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first_imgCALGARY – A financial analyst says prices being paid for Western Canadian oilsands bitumen have fallen so far that many producers are losing money on every barrel sold into the spot market.Analyst Matt Murphy of Tudor Pickering Holt & Co. says recent headlines have been focused on the falling value of the Western Canada Select price, but that measure is for a blend of heavy, sticky bitumen and light oil needed to dilute it so it can flow in a pipeline.The price of WCS fell to about US$19 per barrel on Thursday, about US$52 per barrel below the benchmark U.S. West Texas Intermediate price.“Those are the headlines but the reality is actually quite a bit worse than what those headline WCS differentials would suggest,” said Murphy.“It’s not the actual realizations these producers are getting … you’re losing money before you even produce that barrel at current differential levels.”Condensate, a type of light oil often used to dilute bitumen, was selling for about US$63 per barrel in Edmonton on Thursday, which means the bitumen part of a WCS barrel composed of 30 to 40 per cent diluent was actually fetching between negative 11 cents US and negative 28 cents US per barrel, he said.It’s the first time that has happened, Murphy said, adding bitumen prices have always previously been in positive territory. In early 2016, when U.S. oil prices fell below US$30 per barrel, bitumen was still worth about US$8 per barrel, he said.The negative pricing is expected to be short-lived, however. Demand for heavy oil will increase when U.S. refineries complete fall maintenance programs, he said, and growing crude-by-rail capacity will help bring barrels to market that can’t fit into Canada’s full pipelines.Murphy said he expects railway exports of crude to climb to about 300,000 barrels per day by year-end from recent record levels of more than 200,000 bpd.Cenovus Energy Inc., which slowed bitumen production earlier this year because of poor prices, recently signed contracts with Canada’s two major railways to move 100,000 bpd of heavy crude oil from northern Alberta to various destinations on the U.S. Gulf Coast.“There’s no question that these differentials are challenging and that they underscore the critical need for immediate action on market access,” said Cenovus spokesman Brett Harris in an email. He declined to comment specifically on the company’s price netbacks.Different types of bitumen require differing amounts of diluent to flow in a pipeline.The newest mining projects such as Suncor Energy Inc.’s Fort Hills mine need 20 to 25 per cent diluent but steam-driven projects that produce from wells need 30 to 40 per cent diluent, Murphy said.Follow @HealingSlowly on Twitter.Companies mentioned in this article: (TSX:SU, TSX:CVE)last_img read more

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first_imgUPDATE – Denise Menard has dropped out of the race for Council.  There are now 12 candidates running for six seats.FORT ST. JOHN, B.C. – Lori Ackerman will officially be the mayor of Fort St. John for another four years.Ackerman has been elected mayor by acclamation for the second straight time in this year’s municipal election. She was first elected mayor in 2011 when she beat Don Irwin by 60 votes. She was re-elected by acclamation in 2014. The remaining six seats on Fort St. John City Council have not yet been decided.All six incumbent candidates – Larry Evans, Gord Klassen, Byron Stewart, Trevor Bolin, Bruce Christensen, and Lilia Hansen – have filed nomination papers to be re-elected.Of the five councillors who have served since the last municipal election in 2014, Byron Stewart received the most votes that year with 1,223, finishing second to former councillor Dan Davies. Trevor Bolin finished sixth in that year’s election with 940 votes, less than 100 more than Graham McCoubrey.There are seven candidates challenging the incumbents for their spots on City Council, none of whom have previously been elected to public office.Two-time unsuccessful candidate Becky Grimsrud will be making her third bid for a seat on City Council after she lost last year’s by-election to councillor Hansen.Of the ten candidates looking to be elected to Council, three are involved in the Fort St. John and District Chamber of Commerce. Hansen, who is the Chamber’s executive director, has been joined by Treasurer Tony Zabinsky and, as of Thursday afternoon, Chuck Fowler.Fowler serves as a member of the Chamber’s Board of Directors and is also involved in local grassroots organization FSJ for LNG.Justin Jones, whose nomination papers list him as a sales representative with United Rentals, is the fourth non-incumbent candidate.On Friday, Jim Harris became the eleventh candidate for Council to file. Harris is the manager of Hi-Performance Motor Sports and owns Advantage Hotshot & Pilot Car, according to his nomination papers.center_img With just minutes before this afternoon’s 4:00 p.m. deadline, the City received two more nomination papers. Denise Menard and Gabor Haris have submitted their nomination papers which, as of 4:25 p.m., have not been posted on the City’s website.This year’s municipal election is taking place on October 20th, with advance voting days on the 10th and 17th.last_img read more

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first_imgDAWSON CREEK, B.C. – The Fire Department attended a fire on Sunday, February 3rd, 2019. With a quick response, no one was injured and the fire was contained to the garage.The call was received at 1 pm by the DC Fire Department, one apparatus, three support vehicles and 9 Firefighters were dispatched to the fire that took place on the 1200 block of 117th Avenue, Fire Chief Shorty Smith shared.The fire was contained and the homeowners did have insurance, the cause of the fire is still unknown at this time and remains under investigation. As the temperatures were very cold, Chief Smith shares that fires can burn a little slower when they meet open air yet the test is keeping the fire hoses from freezing.This was a successful event as the fire was confined to the garage and no damage was done to the home.last_img read more

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first_imgVICTORIA, B.C. – The B.C. Wildfire Service is asking the public for help to prevent wildfires this long weekend.While the wildfire activity so far this year has been relatively normal, the Wildfire Service says the month of August is typically the most active part of the province’s wildfire season.They say human-caused wildfires are the leading factor, which is preventable but makes up about 58 percent of this year’s wildfires in B.C. “Human-caused fires are completely preventable and unnecessarily divert crucial firefighting resources from naturally occurring wildfires. From April 1 until noon on July 31, 2019, the B.C. Wildfire Service responded to 579 wildfires throughout B.C., 58 percent of which were human-caused.”While campfires are currently allowed in all areas of the province, the Wildfire Service is reminding British Columbians to practice responsible fire use by assessing their environment and keeping an ample supply of water nearby to fully extinguish any recreational fire they light.For up-to-date wildfire information, you can visit gov.bc.ca/wildfirebans.last_img read more

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first_imgMumbai: National award-winning actor Kalki Koechlin, who has observed a behavioural change among men after the prominence of #MeToo movement in India, says workshops ahead of performing any intimate scene is important. “Intimacy workshops were important because like every dance and action sequences are previously choreographed and each actor knows every movement of the performance, an intimate scene is also choreographed. It is not improvised on the spot,” she added. Also Read – Hilarie Burton, Jeffery Dean Morgan tie the knotThe #MeToo movement has changed the film industry Kalki said. “Of course, there is a change. I would say, consciousness has been created.” Citing an example, she said: “Right after the #MeToo movement took off, I was doing a play where my director was a male, and he sent two pages write-up on how we all should behave at the rehearsal space.” She had an “intimacy rehearsal” where she interacted with her co-actors and asked for permission on “how we will touch each other in an intimate scene. Also Read – ‘Vaastav’ gave me the real sense of being an actor: Sanjay Dutt on film’s 20-year anniversaryKalki has earlier addressed drug addiction and drug mafia in Candyflip, a film and ‘Smoke’, a web series. Talking about her experience, she said: “It happened to one of the friends of our director of the film. That fellow took a lot of drugs and then his mind just flipped, it lost control. It was quite a moving story and it shows the sea of confusion…” How does she look at the situation of youngsters’ addiction? “I do not think only youngsters are suffering from addiction, I have seen middle-aged people also going through the addiction of alcohol and other things. The concept of addiction is when an individual gets into a loop of a habit that he/she cannot come out of,” she said. “Empathy and re-telling the story from our perspective might just change people’s mindset towards those (drug addict) who are suffering. “They are no different from an individual who is addicted to work… it is only wise to humanise the person who is suffering instead of humiliating. That is the way we change our society,” said Kalki.last_img read more

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