November 16, 2019
  • 5:11 am Hazard out to attack Arsenal in ‘special’ semi
  • 5:20 am HIGH PERFORMANCE HERALD: VOLUME 2
  • 5:05 am In The Spotlight – Sarah Peattie
  • 5:03 am Rivals To Meet In Girls NYC Final
  • 5:01 am 2013 ACT Super League Results

first_imgMovea´s Gyration Air Mouse works both in the air and on the desk. Wave your Air Mouse in the air and navigate your mouse pointer on your desktop. Movea’s MotionSense technology that enables it to work both in-air and on desktop by just waving your mouse. Movea´s Gyration Air Mouse uses a proprietary radio frequency technology and has a range of up to 100 feet and also works through walls. The laser sensor enables for precise desktop tracking, making it ideal for working on a desk or other flat surface. Precision motion sensors guarantee accurate responses to natural hand movements. A simple wrist motion will command presentations, enhanced with Movea´s GyroTools presentation effects, or control multimedia entertainment on a laptop or desktop.The RF-based unit weighs approximately 4 ounces. The RF USB unit stores conveniently inside the mouse and comes with a travel case. The device will be available for purchase in early October with a suggested retail price of $99.99. For additional information, visit Gyration Website. Citation: Movea’s Gyration Air Mouse (2008, September 24) retrieved 18 August 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2008-09-movea-gyration-air-mouse.htmlcenter_img This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more

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first_imgThe initiative has been taken by the Ministry of Textiles Government of India through National Handloom Development Corporation (NHDC) to provide handloom weavers a direct access to the market.95 agencies including apex societies, state government bodies among others are displaying their handloom and weaving work. One will find muga silk from Assam,  tussar, kantha, madhubani prints from Bihar, chanderi, maheshwari work from Madhya Pradesh and much more. Five weavers who are recipients of National Award for design are also a part of this exhibition.The unique silk products such as pochampalli, paithani, kanjivaram, jamdani, baluchari, and ikkat are attracting customers with their exclusives designs and traditional motifs. Government of India has launched the Handloom Mark scheme for products, to encourage and give a distinct identity to the products, apart from highlighting the uniqueness of the products. It also serves a guarantee for the buyer.last_img read more

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first_imgIndira Gandhi National Centre for Arts celebrated it’s silver jubilee in an exceptional manner. Delhiites were taken back in time via an exhibition which showcase journey of all the audio-visual equipment INGCA has been using and the multi-disciplinary documentation it has done using them in 25 years.This exhibition titled 25 years of Audiovisual Journey: Recalling Through Equipment and Documentation provides a retrospective stopover to view how evolution took place in the last 25 years and how the world is negotiating towards future – in the digital sphere. Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’IGNCA, has gone beyond the traditional platforms to archive their heritage and with technology they have brought out a lot to public domain. They have brought out a lot in last one year to public domain hence, conducting large number of seminars, exhibitions, collaborative events. Dipali Khanna, member secretary, IGNCA said ‘This exhibition is basically to exhibit the equipments that this organisation have used in 25 years which is for interest to the people who wants to know about it. This is also to show the work we have been documenting on this particular centre.’ Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixIn commemoration of the 25 years of audio-visual, the Media Centre in run-up to this exhibition and also organised a film festival which will screen six documentaries from renowned directors to highlight the cultural vibrancy that has been captured by traditional as well as new age AV techniques.Media Centre of Indira Gandhi National Centre for Arts has been carrying out audio-visual research documentation, archiving them for posterity, post-production and dissemination of documentaries through DVD publication, Doordarshan transmission, film shows and outreach for scholars in Media Centre Library.Eminent actor Kulbhushan Kharbanda, said,‘This exhibition potrays the change in technology, cinema has also progressed in every way from its production, content, picturisation. With technology, the world is getting closer, now everything is available to people easily.’last_img read more

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first_imgIt’s my very first winters in Delhi and winter for me means to binge on food. The city offers so many flavours that I usually get confused about what to eat and amidst of all the confusion I found myself in Eros Hotel’s A Taste of Kashmir food festival. The usual Singh Sahib is converted in Kashmiri theme, right from the table set up where a small decorated Shikara was placed along with the service staffs wearing Kashmiri dresses. The fragrance of traditional Kahva from the pot, being served in the traditional clay glass (khullar) was the thing that arrested my senses on a cold winter evening.  Also Read – ‘Playing Jojo was emotionally exhausting’Kashmiri food is an indigenous fusion of spices and herbs to bring out some of the most unique flavours across the country. Spices that are suited to beat the chilly winters.  The meal started with a refreshing drinks and a platter of starters both veg and non-veg to choose from like Surkh Tsaman Tikka, Rajma Kababa, Arvi Anjeer Kebab and more for the vegetarians. Maaz Shammi, Gadh Dhaniwal Tikka and Kukur Kabargah will be the recommendation for the non-vegetarians. Also Read – Leslie doing new comedy special with NetflixKashmiri food is known to be a heaven for the meat eaters and for the main course chef Mujeebur Rahman served us  signature dishes like Tabakh Maaz, Rista, Gustaba and Roganjosh for the non-vegetarians. They also had plenty in store for the vegetarians with delicacies of lotus stem, mushrooms, haakh (Kashmiri spinach) and eggplant.After the main course desserts were presented, one had ample options to choose from – Kong Phirni (saffron and milk pudding), Khubani Ki Kheer (apricot pudding), Chukander-e-Afroz (beetroot halwa), Sewiyan Kashmiri and more. I specially liked the buffet system with a big Kashmiri themed back drop, along with a traditional Kangri to keep the atmosphere warm. Whole buffet is set up in a way that the guests could taste through all the traditional Kashmiri food like along with different Kashmiri spices which were on display as well. The perfect ambience for that perfect lunch or dinner! We like!last_img read more

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first_img‘A party with a difference, hence the most lavish oath taking ceremony in the history of Maharashtra government formation,’ NCP spokesman Nawab Malik posted on twitter. Sharad Pawar’s NCP with 41 MLAs has already extended outside support to the BJP-led government which will take oath on Friday.The NCP has also said that it will abstain from voting if the new government has to face a trust vote to prove its majority. The swearing-in ceremony of the new government at Wankhede Stadium will be a lavish affair with about 40,000 guests, including PM Narendra Modi, several of his Cabinet colleagues, chief ministers of BJP-ruled states, besides business leaders, actors and celebrities in attendance.last_img

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first_imgVikas Bahl’s coming-of-age drama Queen triumphed at the 60th Filmfare Awards, winning in key categories including best film, best director and best actress for its lead star Kangana Ranaut. The film bagged six honours in total – best editing to Abhijit Kokate and Anurag Kashyap, best cinematography (Bobby Singh and Siddharth Diwan) and and best background score for Amit Trivedi. Kangana, who saw off competition from Alia Bhatt, Madhuri Dixit, Priyanka Chopra, Rani Mukerji and Sonam Kapoor in the best actress category, was not present to accept her award.Vishal Bhardwaj’s Shakespearean tale Haider closely followed Queen with five wins which includes a black lady for Shahid Kapoor in the best actor category and best supporting honours for Tabu and Kay Kay Menon. Haider triumphed in the technical categories as well, with Dolly Ahluwalia winning best costume designer and Subrata Chakraborty and Amit Ray topping the best production design list.The lifetime achievement award was given to veteran actress Kamini Kaushal for her outstanding contribution to Indian cinema. Young star Alia Bhatt bagged the best actress (Critics) trophy for Highway and Sanjay Mishra won the best actor (Critics) for his outstanding performance in Ankhon Dekhi, which also earned director-writer Rajat Kapoor the best story gong.Kriti Sanon won best debut female award for Heropanti, while Pakistani heartthrob Fawad Khan won the best debut male award for Khoobsurat. Rajkumar Hirani and Abhijat Joshi won for PK in the best screenplay and best dialogue categories, which were the only wins for the Aamir Khan-starrer film.In the music categories, Ankit Tiwari won best male playback singer for Galiyaan from Ek Villain and Kanika Kapoor was named best female playback singer for Baby Doll from Ragini MMS 2. Trio Shankar-Ehsaan-Loy won best music director for their work in 2 States. Best choreography honour was handed out to Ahmed Khan for the song Jumme Ki Raat from Salman Khan’s Kick.The evening saw performances from Salman Khan, Arjun Kapoor, Shraddha Kapoor, Varun Dhawan, Ranbir Kapoor, Alia Bhatt and was attended by B-Town celebrities like Rekha, Kajol, Manisha Koirala, Neha Dhupia, Subhash Ghai, Vidya Balan among others.The ceremony held at Yash Raj Studios was hosted by filmmaker Karan Johar and stand-up comedian Kapil Sharma.last_img read more

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first_imgKolkata: West Bengal Chief Minister Mamata Banerjee has written a letter to Prime Minister Narendra Modi urging him to consider the contribution of business houses to the chief minister’s relief funds (CMRF) as money spent on corporate social responsibility (CSR) activities. The letter, a copy of which is with PTI, pointed out “one major infirmity in the present CSR framework as provided in the Companies Act 2013”, concerning the interest of the states. Also Read – Heavy rain hits traffic, flights While contributions to the Prime Minister’s National Relief Fund (PMNRF) was mentioned as an eligible activity under the CSR in the 2013 Act, the same made to the CMRF was not considered as an activity “eligible for contribution under the CSR”, she wrote in the letter. “It will indeed be praiseworthy if contribution to CMRF in the states is also made an eligible activity under CSR. The little contribution would be very helpful to all the states to extend the much-desired assistance and relief to people in need,” the letter read. Also Read – Speeding Jaguar crashes into Merc, 2 B’deshi bystanders killed Stating that the CMRF is always under financial constraints because of limited donations from the companies, Banerjee has written that if the proposal is accepted by the Centre, the “contributions” will also enable the donors to claim tax breaks. “You may be aware that West Bengal, like other states of the country, has an established CMRF, similar to the PMNRF. We have been using the fund to provide medical, education and other kinds of relief to the most needy and distressed people in their times of grave financial crisis. However due to paucity of funds, “we are not being able to fulfill all the requests made for support,” her letter read. The current regime of the CSR in the country was introduced with the notification of Section 135 of the Companies Act 2013 and the CSR Policy Rules, 2014. It mandates that from April 1, 2014 every company, private limited or public limited, which either has a net worth of Rs 500 crore or a turnover of Rs 1,000 crore or net profit of Rs 5 crore, has to spend at least 2 percent of its average net profit for the immediately preceding three financial years on corporate social responsibility activities.last_img read more

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first_imgKolkata: The Annual Summary Revision of electoral rolls has been initiated in the state by the Election Commission on Saturday. New names can be enrolled in the voters’ list and the existing names can be modified through this process that will continue till October 31. “People can enrol new names, delete, modify or transfer existing names within the state by submitting applications at the polling booth located in their neighbourhood. The verification will be done on September 8, September 22 and October 27,” a senior official of the Chief Electoral Officer’s (CEO) office in Bengal said. Also Read – Rain batters Kolkata, cripples normal lifeIn an official statement, the CEO West Bengal specified the forms that one needs to apply for according to their purpose. Form 6 is for inclusion of new names and transfer of an existing name from one Assembly segment to another, Form 6A is for inclusion of new overseas electors, Form 7 for deletion of name of any ineligible or dead voter, Form 8 for correction of existing names or other related details, Form 8A is for transfer of existing name/s from one polling booth to another within the same Assembly segment and Form EPIC 001 for issuance of replacing the Elector’s Photo Identity Card (EPIC). According to sources in the CEO office, beginning from Saturday over the next two months, the booth-level officers would distribute electors’ information door-to-door wherein the details of a voter as available in the existing voters’ list would be mentioned. The existing voters can check for mistakes and apply for correction if any. State-level toll-free numbers — 1950 and 1800111950 — have been made functional at the CEO office to help people with their queries regarding enrollment, modification, deletion and transfer of names. The final voter list will be published on January 4 2019.last_img read more

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first_imgAmerican Idol premiered in 2002 and it has been running (mostly) on and off since then. The show gave birth to a number of other similar shows, each with its own unique twist: The Voice, America’s Got Talent, and most recently, The Masked Singer. One of the most appealing things about these shows to the people who watch them is that they can call in and vote for the performer(s) that they like the best. Before the show, a toll-free number is assigned to each performer, and the shows’ producers tally that information to pick or help pick a winner.Tenth season American Idol tour, Scotty McCreery performing with Thia Megia, Haley Reinhart and Pia Toscano. Photo by Michael Tanne – CC BY-SA 2.0Though this type of program has been running in the United States for close to two decades now, there is a much older version of this show which has run in Europe since 1956.This is Eurovision, which began in Western Europe. In more recent years Eurovision has made headlines in the USA not only because these types of shows are more popular, but because of both national rivalries and controversial decisions on the coveted top prize.Eurovision Song Contest 1965When the show first aired, American music in the form of rock and roll was just getting popular, but a variety of acts were featured, and the people who decided the winners were men and (some) women who worked in the music industry in some way.That changed in 1997 when viewers began calling in to vote for the person they liked best. For Eurovision and other TV programs, this was a relatively new thing, but for some European countries it was “old hat” — sort of.Abba Eurovision. Photo credit OLLE LINDEBORG/AFP/Getty ImagesUntil 1989-90, Europe was truly divided in two: Western Europe aligned with the United States, and Eastern Europe, aligned with the Soviet Union (USSR). In 1977, the Soviets, seeing the popularity of Eurovision, decided to start their own show, “Intervision”, to appeal to those in the Eastern Bloc.The show was essentially like Eurovision, but with state-approved performers singing/performing state-approved songs. Lyrics and jokes belittling the state or those in power were forbidden, and any dancing had to be pretty tame – perhaps not to excite the workers too much!International Radio and Television Organisation (OIRT, Intervision) logo in 1970-1980’s.Oddly enough, in a part of the world that hadn’t held free elections for ages, Intervision allowed viewers to vote for their favorites from the first day, something Eurovision did not do for a long time. There was only one hitch…phones were a rare commodity during those days in the Eastern Bloc and USSR.So, another method for voting had to be used. Ballots mailed in would take too long, and people might lose interest. Plus, there was virtually no trust in paper ballots anywhere. Eventually, the directors of the show, along with the state power authorities (meaning utilities, not those in “power”) came up with an interesting work-around.Participation since 1977. Photo by Alex Great -CC BY-SA 3.0In the last segment of the show, and when the host told them to, people who wanted to vote for that act would run to their light switches and turn on the lights. At the power authority, consumption graphs listed by times would show increases in power use – and thereby, the winner!Read another story from us: The Touching Letters Jim Henson Wrote to his Children and Friends Before he DiedSome pop-culture historians point out that at the time, the communist version was way more democratic than that in the West, and perhaps “voting by light-switch” did work. Others point out that the show required people to sit in the dark waiting to vote for an act they may have liked better than some truly awful ones. No one is quite sure if the system worked as designed, and either way, Intervision went the way of the dodo in 1980, after only four years on the air.last_img read more

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first_imgThe town of Setenil de las Bodegas in Spain has been compared to something out of the Flintstones. Why? Its combination of ancient stone and modern living certainly call to mind the legendary cartoon. It has also been likened to puppet paradise Fraggle Rock! One look tells observers this is no ordinary destination. The striking houses are part of the ‘Pueblos Blancos’, a long-established Andalusian tradition of ‘White Towns’. Yet Setenil de las Bodegas is intriguing as it’s literally built into the rock. Their inhabitants follow in the footsteps of cave dwellers, with boulders providing support and the overhang of the cliffs forming the very roofs themselves.Setenil de las Bodegas in Cadiz Province, Spain is one of the well-known “white villages”. Photo by Jialiang Gao CC by SA-2.5Setenil de las Bodegas. Photo by manuelfloresv CC by 2.0What’s the real story behind this distinctive location, which can be found in the province of Cadiz, southern Spain? The original caves may have been lived in since around 20,000 B.C. Links have been made to the region’s prehistoric past, with the place possibly playing host to a Spanish equivalent of Fred and Wilma.Setenil de las Bodegas. Photo by Andrei Dimofte CC by 2.0Photo by Falconaumanni CC BY-SA 3.0The first true inhabitant was the mighty Rio Trejo river. Everything was built in the eroded gorge created by its movement. The site was later invaded by the all-conquering Romans in the 1st century A.D., and traces exist of previous civilizations. As for how far back it all goes, no-one truly knows. Educated guesswork aside, the archaeology presents a varied and fascinating picture.Photo by Pepe Rodríguez Cordon CC by 2.0Photo by manuelfloresv CC by 2.0Setenil.com has this to say about the general sweep of history. “Setenil is one of those towns whose origins are an enigma,” it states. “First, its blackish-roofed caves bring us back to prehistory, when our primitive congeners possibly used them as a natural refuge. From the ancient stage we know that the Roman colony Laccipo was located nearby. However, it is in the medieval era when the primitive urban settlement dates back to the same place as the current one.”Setenil de las BodegasPhoto by Andrei Dimofte CC by 2.0The name Setenil de las Bodegas gives some pointers about the emergence of a modern community. It can be divided into 2 parts. ‘Setenil’ apparently comes from the Latin ‘septem nihil’, or ‘seven times no’. This refers to the Moors’ control of the area and their repeated fending off of Christian expansion. The formidable Moors occupied the area from the 8th century A.D and were finally overcome in the late 15th when medieval times were drawing to a close.Photo by manuelfloresv CC by 2.0Setenil de las Bodegas, SpainThe second part, ‘de las Bodegas’ – ‘Bodegas meaning ‘wine shop or cellar’ – was added after because it seems the Christians liked their vineyards! The Daily Beast website wrote in 2014 that “The wine storage units, or bodegas, were perfect for the cool caves. Unfortunately, the grape industry in the region was later wiped out in the mid 1800’s by pests.”Photo by José Luis Sánchez Mesa CC by 2.0Related Video:The excellent shade provided by the cliffs was great for produce. So why not humans trying to escape the heat, and indeed the pests? 3,000 live there at the last count, with a healthy tourist trade. Visitors enjoy the taste of authentic chorizo sausage and pork which is locally produced, together with pastries and other fine foods through which the town has made its name.Historical detail is all around, such as the imposing presence of Nazari Castle. This enduring fortress is a relic of the Moors’ occupation. Today it contains an art gallery and gives people a bird’s eye view of the town.Related Article: Entire Abandoned Spanish Villages Are Being Sold Cheap to Raise MoneyWhile there’s still a lot people don’t know about Setenil de las Bodegas, it is a place where a sense of heritage is palpable. Just as the early inhabitants did all those years ago, the current population live their lives in harmony with nature’s awesome spectacle. And thanks to that epic quantity of rock they’re surely amongst the coolest residents in Spain!last_img read more

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first_img Advertisement Here’s Colin’s full interview with LaVar Ball: On Charles Barkley calling him out“If Charles thought like me, maybe he’d win a Championship.” -LaVar BallLaVar Ball responds to Charles Barkley’s criticism: “If Charles thought like me, maybe he’d win a Championship.” pic.twitter.com/XWc9Y5n0Xg— Herd w/Colin Cowherd (@TheHerd) March 7, 2017center_img LaVar Ball has quickly become the most recognizable sports Dad in America. His oldest son Lonzo has burst onto the college basketball scene as the the potential #1 pick in the NBA Draft. His youngest son LaMelo just scored 92 points as a sophomore at Chino Hills High School. The middle son LiAngelo is set to play at UCLA next year.Today, LaVar sat down with Colin to discuss a number of topics, from his relationship with his boys, to his controversial public comments, to recent harsh criticism of him by Charles Barkley.True to form, Ball didn’t hold anything back and didn’t back down from anything. He also got in a dig at Sir Charles that can be filed in the “sick burn” category.On the perception that he only wants Lonzo to play for the Lakers“I did not say Lonzo’s only going to play for the Lakers… I prefer him to play for the Lakers because all my family is here.” — LaVar Ball pic.twitter.com/PwYxv5Au0H— Herd w/Colin Cowherd (@TheHerd) March 7, 2017last_img read more

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first_img 1 min read This hands-on workshop will give you the tools to authentically connect with an increasingly skeptical online audience. In December, a report by The Information indicated that well-funded startup Magic Leap wasn’t nearly as close to producing its vaunted augmented reality headset as demo reels had suggested. CEO Rony Abovitz responded by claiming it had completed a “PEQ (Product Equivalent) build of our target form factor,” and now Business Insider has what it says is “the first public photo” of the device. Delivered by an unnamed source, it shows a person wearing not only a headset, but also a backpack-like setup with an exposed circuit board and processor, and apparently holding the battery pack.If this is the current hardware, then it’s in rough shape, but hardware prototypes often are, and what’s most important is what one sees in that headset. According to BI’s source, next week the company’s board will see a demo unit with belt loops instead of a backpack that looks “more finished.”TIP @techmeme “This is the first-ever public photo of Magic Leap” https://t.co/6hPEMe6eCg pic.twitter.com/i9iKJ8TyvH— Alternative Dave (@redletterdave) February 11, 2017 February 13, 2017 This story originally appeared on Engadget Free Workshop | August 28: Get Better Engagement and Build Trust With Customers Now Enroll Now for Freelast_img read more

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first_imgCancer Vaccines Market “Surge in prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and increase in administration of prophylactic cancer vaccines drive the global cancer vaccines market. In addition, rise in investments and government funding in the development of cancer vaccines supplement the growth. The preventive (prophylactic) vaccine segment accounted for more than half of the total revenue in 2017 and will maintain its dominance by 2023.”According to the report published by Allied Market Research, the Global Cancer Vaccines Market contributed $4.81 billion in 2017 and is estimated to garner $12.81 billion by 2023, growing at a CAGR of 17.7% from 2017 to 2023. The report offers a detailed analysis of the key segments, top investment pockets, changing dynamics, market size & estimations, and competitive scenario.Increasing administration of prophylactic cancer vaccines coupled with launch and approval of new cancer vaccines drive the global cancer vaccines market. However, high cost for development of cancer vaccines due to frequent need for upgradation in manufacturing technology and longer timelines required for manufacturing a vaccine restrict the market growth. On the contrary, increasing transition from prophylactic to therapeutic cancer vaccines and high growth prospects in the emerging markets would present opportunities in the cancer vaccines market.Download Sample Copy of this Report @ https://www.alliedmarketresearch.com/request-sample/1453Preventive (prophylactic) vaccine segment to maintain its dominance by 2023The preventive (prophylactic) vaccine segment accounted for more than half of the total revenue in 2017 and will maintain its dominance by 2023. However, the therapeutic vaccine segment is expected to register the highest CAGR of 20.2% from 2017 to 2023.North America to maintain lead position by 2023The market across the North America region accounted for two-fifths of the market in terms of revenue in 2017. However, the market across the Asia-Pacific region is expected to grow at the highest CAGR of 19.6% during the forecast period. The report also explores the other regions including Europe and LAMEA.Recombinant segment to lead throughout the forecast periodThe recombinant segment accounted for nearly one-third of the total revenue in 2017 and will maintain its dominance by 2023. However, the dendritic cells segment is projected to register the highest CAGR of 18.6% from 2017 to 2023.Cervical cancer segment to maintain its dominance by 2023The cervical cancer segment accounted for more than three-fifths of the market in terms of revenue in 2017. However, other indications segment is expected to grow at the highest CAGR of 18.8% during the forecast period.Adults segment to maintain its dominance by 2023The adults segment accounted for more than three-fifths of the market in terms of revenue in 2017. However, the pediatrics segment is expected to grow at the highest CAGR of 19.3% during the forecast period.  Leading market playersThe key market players explored in the research include Merck & Co., Inc., CSL Limited, AstraZeneca Plc. (Medimmune, LLC.), Serum Institute of India Pvt. Ltd., GlaxoSmithKline Plc., Astellas Pharma Inc., Pfizer Inc., Sanofi Pasteur, Sanpower Group, and Aduro BioTech Inc.Check discounts available on this report @ https://www.alliedmarketresearch.com/purchase-enquiry/1453About usAllied Market Research, a market research and advisory company of Allied Analytics LLP, provides business insights and market research reports to large as well as small & medium enterprises. The company assists its clients to strategize business policies and achieve sustainable growth in their respective market domain.Allied Market Research provides one stop solution from the beginning of data collection to investment advice. The analysts at Allied Market Research dig out factors that help clients to understand the significance and impact of market dynamics. The company amplies client’s insight on the factors, such as strategies, future estimations, growth or fall forecasting, opportunity analysis, and consumer surveys among others. As follows, the company offers consistent business intelligent support to aid the clients to turn into prominent business firm.last_img read more

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first_imgStop Resetting My Apps blocks default apps resets on Windows 10 by Martin Brinkmann on October 28, 2016 in Software – Last Update: July 05, 2017 – 12 commentsStop Resetting My Apps is a free program for Microsoft’s Windows 10 operating system to block the system from resetting default programs for certain tasks.One of Windows 10’s biggest usability issues is that the operating system may reset some or even all default apps or file associations after operating system updates.This can be extremely frustrating for the user, as it means that files or protocols will open in the default programs that ship with Windows 10 instead of user selected programs. Additionally, it means that you have to waste some time correcting the reset file associations again.Stop Resetting My AppsStop Resetting My Apps is a rather simple program for Windows 10 designed to block Windows 10 from resetting default apps.The program displays a list of default Windows 10 apps, Microsoft Edge, Mail, Photos, Movies & TV, Groove Music and 3D Builder, on start.All you need to do to block it from being set as the default app on the system is to click on it in the program interface. This adds a “stop” icon to the tile that marks it as blocked.Blocking won’t prevent the application from working on the computer. You can still run it and use all of its functionality.What it does is block the selected application from being set as a default app for any file extension or protocol.So, if you want Mail to be handled by Thunderbird or Gmail instead of the default Mail application, you simply click on it for that. Windows 10 cannot set Mail as the default handler for the mailto protocol anymore from that moment on.The same is true for any of the other applications the program supports. You could for instance block any app that you don’t use if you are unsure about some of the apps supported by Stop Resetting My Apps.You can undo any blocking by running the program again and clicking on its tile in the interface. This removes the “stop” icon from it and enables it for file associations and protocols again.Stop Resetting My Apps does not need to run in the background once you have made the changes. You can close the program afterwards without losing any of its functionality.Note: In case you are wondering how this works: You can set a NoOpenWith string in the Windows Registry to prevent specific apps from taking over file associations.So, here is what you need to do for that if you prefer the manual way:Tap on the Windows-key, type regedit.exe and hit the Enter-key. This opens the Windows Registry Editor. If you can, open a second Registry window for easier handling of the following operations.Navigate to the following key: HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\Classes\Local Settings\Software\Microsoft\Windows\CurrentVersion\AppModel\Repository\PackagesLocate the application you want to block from being the default, and open App\Capabilities\FileAssociations there. This displays the list of file associations of that particular application.Take note of the value in Data, it looks like a long random string: AppXsq3757nydv3f9bx6862hv0t4z7ennqqdPlease note that this string may be different for any of the file types or protocols listed there.Switch to the second Registry Editor window, and go to HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\Classes\ThatRandomString, e.g. HKEY_CURRENT_USER\SOFTWARE\Classes\AppXsq3757nydv3f9bx6862hv0t4z7ennqqdRight-click on it, and select New > String Value.Name it NoOpenWith, and keep its value empty.Repeat the process for any file association that you don’t want that particular app to be ever associated with again.Summary12345 Author Rating2.5 based on 8 votes Software Name Stop Resetting My AppsOperating System WindowsSoftware Category ProductivityLanding Page http://www.carifred.com/stop_resetting_my_apps/ Advertisementlast_img read more

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first_imgStrongbox Password Safe is a free, open-source KeePass client for iOS by Ashwin on July 11, 2019 in Apple – Last Update: August 12, 2019 – 11 commentsMany privacy/security conscious users, including myself, prefer to use KeePass. After all a free, actively supported, open-source application, that stores your logins in an encrypted database on your local storage is hard to beat.Strongbox Password Safe is a free, open-source KeePass client for iOS which I personally prefer to use .iOS used to have a ton of great KeePass clients, but a lot of them have been abandoned for over 2 years. A new app called KeePassium is currently in open beta. Also free, and open-source, with a better looking UI, it does seem promising. But, let’s focus on why Strongbox is a good choice.Cloud-based services like LastPass, and the open-source Bitwarden, may provide a lot of options when it comes to Password Managers on iOS (and other platforms). They are free to use on all platforms, and hence people often opt for convenience when it comes to mobile devices. The auto-fill feature is especially useful on a smartphone.Strongbox provides the same functionality, and offers a lot more privacy. For one, it doesn’t store your database on its servers. You decide where the database is stored and accessed from.You can create a new database using Strongbox or import an existing database. The latter has the following options to choose from.One DriveGoogle DriveDropboxWebDAVSFTPCopy from URLFiles (Local Storage)Strongbox Password Safe supports KeePass 1 (KDB 1) and KeePass 2 (KDBX 3.1/KDBX 4.0) and Password Safe 3 (PSAFE3) database formats.Note: If you choose a cloud-storage service, it is advisable to use the corresponding service’s app on all your devices to keep them up to date. For example, I use the Dropbox app on my computer, Android phone and iPad to sync my KeePass database (.KDBX) across all 3 devices.Selecting a cloud service will require you to authenticate the Strongbox app to access your account. Once you have done that, you will need to select the database that you wish to use. It is perfectly safe to store your KeePass database on the cloud, since it will be encrypted and requires the master password that you set, to decrypt it but that is not a requirement.Just make sure you use a strong password. For added security, always enable 2FA (Two-factor authentication) for your Dropbox/Google Drive/One Drive accounts. You can optionally set the database to be accessed in read-only mode if you wish. I wouldn’t really advise using the “Allow empty password” option.Once your database has been added to the app, tap on it to open the database. The app displays the information using a two-pane view. The left pane has all your folders, and accounts which aren’t stored in any folder. Tap a folder or account name to open it. The details of the selected account will be displayed on the right pane.This includes the FavIcon of the website, the title of the login, your username and password (hidden by default, can tap to view), the URL for logging in to the account, and any metadata if available. You can edit any of the fields or add a custom field using the “Edit” option.You can sort the list from the toolbar on the bottom. This is where you can also manage the program’s settings, which includes options to change your master password, export the database, etc. It also displays some interesting options such as the total number of usernames, how many of those are unique, including the number of unique passwords, most used username, the database format, etc.Tip: Navigate to the iOS Settings > Passwords & Accounts > AutoFill Passwords and select Strongbox. This allows you to use the app’s autofill feature in Safari and other apps. To use the feature, open any website where you have an account, hit the sign in option, and the keyboard should pop-up when you tap the login field. Select the displayed “login”. It will have the word Strongbox above it, and you’re good to go.Password Generation, Auto clear clipboard and Advanced OptionsThere is a gear icon in the top right corner of the Strongbox UI, which you can use to generate secure passwords. This can be handy if you are creating new accounts, or replacing old passwords. There are some other useful options like the new entry defaults, that can also be useful for adding new entries. It lets you set the autofill options for forms with a default username (can be your most used one), or custom username, and even lets you save a randomly generated password.The Auto clear clipboard option is a must use one, though it is disabled by default. You can set it to as low as 30 seconds to a maximum of 3 minutes. There is a similar Database automatic locking option, but this one is pre-enabled.The best feature in the app is perhaps the App Unlock failure setting, which you can customize. It allows the application to delete all databases, local files, caches, etc that are related to Srongbox after a certain number of failed attempts. So, in case someone gains access to your device and tries to break in to your database, the app will protect your information by auto deleting them.Optional paid featuresMy only gripe with Strongbox is that the search database option is not available in the app for free. You have to pay to use that feature.Update: Search is now included in the free version of Strongbox.There are a couple of subsctiption options that you can opt-for, or a one-time fee for a lifetime license that unlocks this feature among others. Strongbox Password Safe Pro supports Touch ID and PIN Code, i.e., you can use the fingerprint scanner on your iPhone or iPad or the screen unlock code, to quickly access your database. The only other feature that the PRO version has is support for KeePass FavIcons.But really, I’m nitpicking here. Given the lack of other KeePass clients, and the fact that I rarely search for passwords, I’m fine with the freemium model that Strongbox employs. You can try the Pro features for free for 91 Days, if you like to.If you’re an Android user, I can vouch for Keepass2Android. It is available in 2 versions: One which works offline, and another with cloud-storage sync.Now you: Which password manager do you use?Summary12345 Author Ratingno rating based on 0 votes Software Name Strongbox Password SafeOperating System iOS, iPadOSSoftware Category SecurityPrice FreeLanding Page https://apps.apple.com/app/strongbox-password-safe/id897283731 Advertisementlast_img read more

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first_imgScience season in Antarctica begins in November, when noontime temperatures at McMurdo Station climb to a balmy 18 degrees Fahrenheit and the sun hangs in the sky all day and night. For a researcher traveling there from the United States, the route takes time as well as patience. The easiest way is to fly from Los Angeles to Christchurch, New Zealand—a journey of 17 hours, if you’re lucky—and then to McMurdo, a charmless cluster of buildings that houses most of the southern continent’s thousand or so seasonal residents and both of its ATMs. McMurdo isn’t the end of the line, though. Often it’s just a pass-through for scientists hopping small planes to penguin colonies or meteorological observatories farther afield.Few places in Antarctica are more difficult to reach than Thwaites Glacier, a Florida-sized hunk of frozen water that meets the Amundsen Sea about 800 miles west of McMurdo. Until a decade ago, barely any scientists had ever set foot there, and the glacier’s remoteness, along with its reputation for bad weather, ensured that it remained poorly understood. Yet within the small community of people who study ice for a living, Thwaites has long been the subject of dark speculation. If this mysterious glacier were to “go bad”—glaciologist-­speak for the process by which a glacier breaks down into icebergs and eventually collapses into the ocean—it might be more than a scientific curiosity. Indeed, it might be the kind of event that changes the course of civilization.In December 2008, a Penn State scientist named Sridhar Anandakrishnan and five of his colleagues made the epic journey to Thwaites, two days from McMurdo by plane, tractor, and snowmobile. All glaciers flow, but satellites and airborne radar missions had revealed that something worrisome was happening on Thwaites: The glacier was destabilizing, dumping ever more ice into the sea. On color-coded maps of the region, its flow rate went from stable blue to raise-the-alarms red. As Anandakrishnan puts it, “Thwaites started to pop.”The change wasn’t necessarily cause for alarm. Big glaciers can speed up or slow down for reasons that scientists still don’t completely grasp. But Anandakrishnan knew that Thwaites’ unusual characteristics—it is shaped like a wedge, with the thin front end facing the ocean—left it vulnerable to losing vast quantities of ice quickly. What’s more, its size was something to reckon with. Many glaciers resemble narrow rivers that thread through mountain valleys and move small icebergs leisurely into the sea, like a chute or slide. Thwaites, if it went bad, would behave nothing like that. “Thwaites is a terrifying glacier,” Anandakrishnan says simply. Its front end measures about 100 miles across, and its glacial basin—the thick part of the wedge, extending deep into the West Antarctic interior—runs anywhere from 3,000 to more than 4,000 feet deep. A few years before Anandakrishnan’s first expedition, scientists had begun asking whether warming waters at the front edge could be playing a part in the glacier’s sudden stirring. But he wanted to know what was going on deep below Thwaites, where its ice met the earth.During that 2008 expedition and another a year later, Anandakrishnan’s team performed the geologic equivalent of an ultrasound on Thwaites. Each morning they’d wake up in their freezing tents, call McMurdo on the satellite phone to attest that they were still alive, eat a quick breakfast, and move out by snowmobile across the blankness of the ice sheet. At a prearranged point, they’d place an explosive charge at the bottom of a hole—usually between 70 and 100 feet deep—fill the hole with snow, and blow it up. The wave of energy would travel from the charge to the bed of the glacier and back to the surface, where it would be recorded by an array of geophones, exquisitely sensitive seismic instruments. By measuring the time it took for the waves to rebound, and by looking at alterations in the waves’ characteristics, Anandakrishnan’s team could gain clues about the depth and makeup of the glacier’s bed, thousands of feet below. They repeated the process again and again. ANATOMY OF A MELTDOWN: In one of the largest scientific collaborations in Antarctic history, a team of British and American researchers is scrutinizing Thwaites Glacier from every side—air, ice, and sea.Grounding Line: For the time being, Thwaites is held in place by a bump in the seafloor. Once it pulls off this so-called grounding line, it’ll begin to collapse more quickly.Ghost Ridge: Glaciologists have identified a second bump about 45 miles behind the current one. They call it the Ghost Ridge, and there’s hope it could significantly slow Thwaites’ decline.Explosive Charges: Seismologists study the area under the glacier by setting off small explosive charges in the ice and listening for the reverberations.Ice Shelf: A floating ice shelf defends Thwaites from the assaults of ocean currents. As it disintegrates, more and more of the glacier becomes vulnerable, and more icebergs end up in the sea. Sridhar Anandakrishnan has been to Antarctica more than 20 times.Ross Mantle On a warm afternoon this past September, at a conference at Columbia University’s Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, just up the Hudson River from Manhattan, Anandakrishnan gave a lecture detailing his plans for returning to Thwaites. All told, there were 120 scientists in attendance, some of whom had been meeting annually to discuss the West Antarctic Ice Sheet. For 25 years, they had debated whether the region’s potential instabilities were cause for alarm and whether Thwaites, which acts as the keystone holding the ice sheet together, was a near-term risk. This year the conference had a larger sense of purpose: The United States and Great Britain had recently announced a more than $50 million joint venture known as the International Thwaites Glacier Collaboration. Over the course of five years, scientists would probe the glacier in every conceivable manner.At the conference, it was hard to shake the notion that the situation was urgent. “The question is, what’s going to happen next?” Ted Scambos, the American project coordinator of the Thwaites Collaboration, told me. “Is it going to be 50 years or 200 years before we see a truly large increase in the rate of ice being unloaded into the ocean from that glacier?” As a practical consideration, the world needed to know. Over the past few decades, climatologists have become better and better at modeling how Earth’s atmosphere is responding to rising concentrations of greenhouse gases. But ice-sheet models, which aim to translate various future scenarios into actual impacts, such as changes in sea level, aren’t nearly as reliable. One reason for this is that the physics of glaciers has proven formidably complex, with many factors that influence their behavior still unknown. “There is uncertainty and crudity in these models,” Dave Pollard, an ice-sheet expert from Penn State, told me. The point of the Thwaites Collaboration, he said, is to fill in some of the blanks.The architects of the collaboration, the National Science Foundation in the US and the Natural Environment Research Council in the UK, selected eight research projects from among 24 proposals. Some will focus on the front end of Thwaites, which extends beyond the shoreline of Antarctica and forms a cantilevered ice shelf that floats on the Amundsen Sea. Ice shelves are a good thing. As glaciologists are fond of saying, they act like corks, preventing upstream ice—the wine in the bottle, so to speak—from pouring into the sea. They also protect the glacier from warming waters. Thwaites’ ice shelf has been crumbling, so one group in the collaboration, calling itself Tarsan (Thwaites-Amundsen Regional Survey and Network), will investigate the local effects of ocean circulation and warm air. Another team, known as Melt (not an acronym), will use submersible robots and seals tagged with satellite transmitters to examine the glacier’s so-called grounding line, the point where its front end rests on the ocean floor.Anandakrishnan’s seismic experiments will be among the most crucial parts of the collaboration’s work. His group has taken the name Ghost, which stands for Geophysical Habitat of Subglacial Thwaites. His study will map a sliver of the bed beneath the glacier, deep below sea level, in an effort to predict how Thwaites will behave in the future. Soft, wet sediment, Anandakrishnan says, can make a glacier slide extremely fast, and it is probable that a lot of such sediment lies under Thwaites. He likens it to what you might find “when you go into your backyard and play with the mud with your kids. It’s got a little bit of strength but not a great deal.” A few weeks before the conference, I visited Anandakrishnan at Penn State. His office, an austere space with white cinder block walls, cluttered with books and stacks of papers, had little in the way of mementos to show that he’s been to Antarctica more than 20 times. As we talked, he laid out his plan for studying Thwaites. In 2008 and 2009, he told me, he examined an area of the glacier bed roughly 25 miles long. The blueprint for the next four years, beginning in the winters of 2020 and 2021, is far more ambitious: With nearly a ton of explosives in tow, Anandakrishnan and around a dozen colleagues should be able to chart an area 10 times as big. If things go right, the seismic reverberations will illuminate the contours and material composition of what’s underneath Thwaites.Anandakrishnan stood up and walked over to a whiteboard to draw me a picture of the glacier bed’s geometry. It was a line that began with a bump in the front, where the glacier met the sea, and sloped gently downward as it went inland. At the moment, he said, it’s unclear how long Thwaites has before it pulls off its bump—its grounding line—and starts a rapid decline. “It’s kind of hanging on by its fingernails right about there,” he explained, gesturing at the bump.Glaciers like Thwaites that terminate in the ocean tend to follow a familiar pattern of collapse. At first, water gnaws at the ice shelf from below, causing it to weaken and thin. Rather than sitting securely on the seafloor, it begins to float, like a beached ship lifted off the sand. This exposes even more of its underside to the water, and the weakening and thinning continue. The shelf, now too fragile to support its own weight, starts snapping off into the sea in enormous chunks. More ice flows down from the glacier’s interior, replenishing what has been lost, and the whole cycle starts over again: melt, thin, break, retreat; melt, thin, break, retreat.It is difficult to find any scientist, Anandakrishnan especially, who thinks that Thwaites can avoid this fate. Because its bed lies below sea level, water will pursue it far inland. When Thwaites’ grounding line starts to retreat, possibly within the next few decades, Anandakrishnan says, it could do so fairly fast. That retreat may raise sea levels only modestly at first. From radar studies, scientists believe they have detected another bump, now called the Ghost Ridge, that runs about 45 miles behind the existing one. This is what Anandakrishnan’s Ghost team will trace with their seismic experiments from the surface. Is the ridge made of wet sediment, or is it firm and dry? Is it low, or is it high? Such esoteric differences may have extraordinary effects. If any good news arises from his fieldwork at Thwaites, Anandakrishnan says, it may come from the discovery that the glacier has a chance of getting firmly stuck on the Ghost Ridge. More Great WIRED StoriesAn eye-scanning lie detector is forging a dystopian futureA SpaceX delivery capsule may be contaminating the ISSHow to use Apple Watch’s new heart rate featuresEverything you need to know about data breachesTumblr’s displaced porn bloggers test their new platforms👀 Looking for the latest gadgets? Check out our picks, gift guides, and best deals all year round📩 Get even more of our inside scoops with our weekly Backchannel newsletter Perhaps the greatest problem in imagining the future of Thwaites lies in trying to imagine a natural disaster that has never occurred in all of recorded human history. One day at Penn State, I dropped in on Anandakrishnan’s colleague Richard Alley, who sat me down in his office and insisted that I watch a clip of a short documentary he had been replaying on YouTube. Like his friend Anandakrishnan, Alley studied with Charlie Bentley at Wisconsin and has been thinking about the instabilities of West Antarctica for 30 years. The video detailed a catastrophe in Norway in the late 1970s. In the agricultural town of Rissa, the land, an unstable soil known as quick clay, suddenly liquefied during a construction project. Within a few hours, 82 acres fell into a lake. One person died, and the man filming the incident barely escaped with his life.“It’s not ice,” Alley cautioned me as we watched. “But it’s an analogy for what can happen when things can break, when the cliff is too high and nothing piles up at the bottom.” Alley’s point was that this could be the situation for Thwaites. As a glacier breaks down, larger cross sections of the wedge become exposed to the elements. The process creates an ice cliff, which gets so tall that it can no longer sustain itself. In engineering terms, the ice suffers a material failure. In models, it breaks, and it breaks fast. The resulting icebergs are likely to float away, carried by swells and tides, rather than create a pileup that slows things down.“So the question,” Alley said, “is where is the threshold for triggering that in an irreversible or nearly irreversible way?” In his view, one of the most critical pieces of the Thwaites Collaboration is investigating when the glacier’s grounding line might move beyond the Ghost Ridge. This is conceivably the point at which disaster ensues. “If Thwaites behaves itself, and we only get a meter of sea-level rise by 2100 under a high-emissions scenario, a meter is a big deal,” Alley said. It would be painful, but humanity could adapt by building floodgates and sea walls, rethinking patterns of real estate development, and retreating from vulnerable shorelines. But what Thwaites and the glaciers around it have in store could be much more significant. “You have to think in terms of maybe 3 feet, but maybe 10 or 15,” Alley said. Maybe 15 feet. In that scenario, the Jefferson Memorial and Fenway Park would be underwater, and the Googleplex would become an archipelago. Outside the US, the damage would be incalculable. Shanghai, Lagos, Mumbai, Jakarta—all would flood or drown.For now, the prospect of Thwaites’ rapid collapse seems enough of a possibility that a few scientists have suggested buttressing it. One of these geoengineering schemes, recently put forward by Michael Wolovick and John Moore, proposes that an “artificial sill” of gravel and rocks be constructed at the base of Thwaites to protect it from warm water. In an academic paper, Wolovick and Moore acknowledge that such an undertaking would be “comparable to the largest civil engineering projects that humanity has ever attempted.” When I spoke with Wolovick, he told me that the idea was intended to spark debate about a “glacial intervention” that may take a century to conceive and execute. Whatever the cost, he said, it seemed worth it. Rapid sea-level rise could mean trillions of dollars in losses and the mass migration of hundreds of millions of people. The poorer parts of the planet would invariably suffer worst. “If you stop sea-level rise at the source,” Wolovick said, “that benefits everyone.”When I asked Anandakrishnan what he thought of this plan, he said it made him wonder whether we were in danger of losing sight of the larger problem. Geoengineering Thwaites would be the most difficult and dangerous construction project in the history of humanity, he agreed. As one of only two dozen people who has actually been to the glacier, he could say this with some authority. About 100 workers died building the Hoover Dam, he noted; the hazards here might be similarly large, or worse, even if you could get the right equipment in place. “But whether geoengineering works or not—and that’s a separate question—it doesn’t address the effects of pumping CO2 into the atmosphere,” he told me. “And that’s what is raising temperatures, melting glaciers, acidifying the ocean, and changing weather patterns around the earth.”Dave Pollard, the Penn State ice-sheet modeler, and his colleague Rob DeConto, of the University of Massachusetts, have found divergent futures for Thwaites. “It ranges from devastating sea-level rise and rapid retreat into the middle of West Antarctica for ‘business-as-usual’ emissions,” Pollard told me, to “very little sea-level rise and tiny retreat around the edges.” The second future is possible, though, only if we keep atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations where they are today or allow them to go only slightly higher. Such a feat would involve cutting back drastically on fossil fuels and making a wholesale switch—as soon as possible—to a renewable-energy economy. Pollard’s point was that even a glacier as vulnerable as Thwaites could conceivably be contained if humans decided to radically change their behavior.And that’s the biggest problem of all. We’re so small and so stubborn, and the challenges in holding back the ice are so large. Saving Thwaites, or even finding out whether the Ghost Ridge looks stable, won’t save the world. At the rate temperatures are rising, Anandakrishnan may soon have to pack up his explosives and go elsewhere. By then, some other glacier will be hanging by its fingernails.Jon Gertner (@jongertner) is the author of The Idea Factory: Bell Labs and the Great Age of American Innovation. His second book, about the melting of the Greenland Ice Sheet, is due out this summer.This article appears in the January issue. Subscribe now.Let us know what you think about this article. Submit a letter to the editor at mail@wired.com.Listen to this story, and other WIRED features, on the Audm app. You might therefore think of Thwaites as a man dangling from the edge of a cliff. Just as he falls, he grips a rock, a sturdy handhold, to avoid the abyss. Of course, the rock may loosen and dislodge tragically in his hands. And then he’ll drop. The first team ever to set foot on Thwaites Glacier, in the late 1950s, included a crusty glaciologist named Charlie Bentley. He spent 25 months driving around West Antarctica in a tractor, taking soundings across the ice. His process was much like Anandakrishnan’s. Bentley would drill a hole deep enough to reach the compact layer of snow known as firn or, better yet, solid ice; place in it an explosive charge; and then register the shock wave using geophones. In those days, the data was recorded in analog form, with a needle “that would shake back and forth and inscribe something on a piece of paper that was whipping past,” Anandakrishnan says. “Afterwards, you would look at the record, and the distance on the paper was equivalent to a certain amount of time.” Bentley’s momentous discovery was that much of West Antarctica’s land is actually below sea level, even though it is cloaked by thick sheets of ice.Anandakrishnan never intended to help revolutionize this process with digital networks, but that’s how things turned out. He had little interest in ice or climate when he arrived as a graduate student in electrical engineering at the University of Wisconsin in the mid-1980s. Born in India, he had spent his teenage years in suburban Maryland, which is why he carries in his speech a relaxed folksiness; his father, a civil engineer, worked as a science adviser to the Indian ambassador in Washington. Anandakrishnan’s main interests during his college years were fiber optics and lasers. He planned to become a professor or an optical engineer in Silicon Valley. But then he answered an advertisement for a summer job.A group of Wisconsin glaciologists were trying to link their instruments together in the field, so they could record their data on a central hard drive. Anandakrishnan designed a fiber-­optic system for their project and was eventually asked to go to Antarctica to install it. He was 23 years old. “These were things that I knew absolutely nothing about,” he says. “I’d come from a straight engineering background. I knew that glaciers existed. I knew glaciers had something to do with sea level. But I really knew nothing more than that.” When he got back to school, he remembers thinking, “I’m a year into my PhD program in electrical engineering. I have a guaranteed mansion or a yacht down the road, if I want it, or a position in a university. Or I could retrain myself—learn seismology, geology, glaciology, climate, oceans.” He’d been transfixed, he says, by the “unending horizons” of the ice sheet, but he was also taken in by a world of what he calls “capital-T” toys—snowmobiles, forklifts, cranes, and cargo planes. He immediately signed up for a PhD in glaciology, which happened to be Bentley’s department.Anandakrishnan knows that exploding small bombs in ice may seem primitive. Each blast, known as a shot, can yield a foul gas that blows up from the borehole, along with sooty residue that sometimes rains down on researchers and their equipment. “But the reality is there is almost no other way to get the information we’re trying to get,” he says. Airborne radar missions can do some of the same work with equal accuracy and less fuss, but they can’t penetrate rock, so they don’t reveal much about the nature of the glacier bed.This used to be the case with seismic soundings too. When Bentley was driving around Thwaites in 1957, the only thing he could calculate with any certainty was depth. When digital recordings became standard in the 1980s, researchers could focus on small changes in the reflection strength of the bed at different points and different angles. This new level of sensitivity, Anandakrishnan says, profoundly changed his field.Innovations in explosives have also helped. Early glacier soundings, including Bentley’s, were done with TNT. On the upcoming Thwaites expeditions, Anandakrishnan—who still designs much of his own equipment—will instead use PETN, a chemical compound frequently found in plastic explosives. (It comes in 200-gram cylinders about the size of your index finger.) Besides being very stable, PETN is fast; its seismic waves propagate through ice at about 12,000 feet per second. This is critical, because a higher-frequency explosion will collect more detailed information about the glacier bed. When it comes time for a shot on Thwaites, the wind has to be quiet. Nobody is allowed to breathe, cough, or sneeze. “We have a protocol for all machinery in the area to be shut off,” Anandakrishnan says. “Nothing can be happening. People can’t be walking. They can’t be talking. Everybody gets stock still. And for that five seconds when that seismic energy is coming up to your geophones, that’s the only thing you want those devices to be hearing.” On the surface you hear a thunk. If you’re close enough, and if it’s a large enough shot, you can feel it in your feet, a little tap on the soles. The team will look at the data quickly to confirm that the blast reached the bed. Then they’ll move on.I asked Anandakrishnan whether there was any chance that he might crack off part of Thwaites with his explosive charges, which can sometimes add up to about a kilogram. I imagined some kind of calamitous avalanche, as in the Alps. He shook his head. “This ice sheet is so large,” he said. His small bombs would destroy the office we were sitting in, but they were nothing compared with the forces of nature moving Thwaites’ ice into the ocean. By the end of the mission in 2009, Anandakrishnan and his colleagues had collected data from about 150 boreholes. The new information didn’t precisely explain what was hastening Thwaites’ acceleration, but it was a start. Meanwhile, the satellite maps kept getting redder and redder. In 2014, Eric Rignot, a glaciologist at NASA, concluded that Thwaites was entering a state of “unstoppable” collapse. Even worse, scientists were starting to think that its demise could trigger a larger catastrophe in West Antarctica, the way a rotting support beam might lead to the toppling not only of a wall but of an entire house. Already, Thwaites’ losses were responsible for about 4 percent of global sea-level rise every year. When the entire glacier went, the seas would likely rise by a few feet; when the glaciers around it did, too, the seas might rise by more than a dozen feet. And when that happened, well, goodbye, Miami; goodbye, Boston.No one could say exactly when Thwaites would go bad. But Anandakrishnan and his colleagues now had an even keener sense of the perils that the glacier posed. “We had been walking on the lip of a volcano without knowing it,” he says.last_img read more

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first_imgThis year is the 40th anniversary of Sydney’s Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras.To mark this milestone, one photographer has drawn together significant memories of the festival from 40 LGBTI people. Richard Hedger was inspired to do so after taking photos at the event for many years. Mardi Gras Parade 2010 | Photo: Richard HedgerAnd in the 40th anniversary year he see’s how far the pride has grown as an achievement, but also a time for reflection:‘Our corporatized and globalized uber-capitalistic world has changed the landscape irrevocably and Mardi Gras can’t escape that. With the current right-wing neo-liberal party politic state endorsed poofta bashing alive and kicking, I think Mardi Gras is more relevant than ever. Our human rights are central to us as a species, nation, and world.‘I’m not fond of floats and marching people as product placement. Moreover, I believe that should be left to the ads and fences. We need more people to get on the streets and dress the fuck up again! Where are the cheeky floats taking the piss?‘Where are the grand costumes and brilliant moving sculptures? Maybe people are too busy or poor or unable to dislocate themselves from a screen – but I miss the irreverent, vibrant, rebellious, political creative edge the parade once had.’Ian Roberts – ActorIan’s portrait in Telling Tales 40 years of Sydney Mardis Gras | Photo: http://www.richardhedger.comBy the time Ian turned 18, he had started to explore his sexuality. And with a good friend would frequent Sydney’s gaybourhood Oxford Street, on Fridays and Saturdays.‘It was there that I met John Appleby and Andrew Hill, who became lifelong friends in a ménage à Trois relationship. Around 1984, the boys were going to be working at Mardi Gras doing the lighting and visual effects for the party. Leading up to the party I was a bit nervous and apprehensive. But they invited me along and I spent the night up on one of the scaffolding towers throwing fake snow. It was fabulous. The first time I’d been to the party and the first time I had explored my sexuality as well. It felt like a rebirth.’But this wasn’t his most significant memory, which was actually a sad story of the hate that can surround a pride festival:‘John and Andrew moved to America. Sadly, they both passed away from HIV/AIDS. They were a generation older than me and I often think if I’d been born earlier I might possibly not be here today. So the year after my first Mardi Gras where I was with John and Andrew, I still wasn’t out.Mardi Gras Parade 2010 | Photo: Richard Hedger‘On parade night a friend and I walked behind the Exchange Hotel on Liverpool Street and we saw an older gay man being beaten up. There was a crowd standing around making fun of him. My friend and I just stood there, joining the mob. I remember seeing them take off the man’s leather jacket and boots in order to humiliate him, spitting on him and pushing him down.‘Although the parade revelers were only a street away, there was a weird silence that seemed to go on and on. When the thugs left, the man sat in the gutter, shirt torn, clutching his jacket and tying his boots.‘My friend offered to help him up, but was pushed away and told he should have done something to help earlier. In spite of his ordeal, the man was dignified. He straightened himself and quietly walked away. But as I think back I feel so ashamed that I didn’t react to defend a gay man in trouble because I was feeling awkward about my own sexuality. I often think of him and wish I had acted differently.So now, while Ian finds Mardi Gras still relevant, he feels it needs to be more political.‘Now young gay people can go to clubs where they are accepted for who they are. Hopefully, that will continue. I’m old school. I still bear the scars of resentment and feel a sense of shame. The younger generation shouldn’t have to suffer as we did. They should never feel isolated or be discriminated against.’Casey – Sydney residentCasey’s portrait in Telling Tales 40 years of Sydney Mardis Gras | Photo: http://www.richardhedger.comCasey was 19 at his first Mardi Gras in 2004.‘I had been living in Sydney for about 18 months. Slowly I built up the confidence to go to the Oxford Street bars and clubs. But, eventually, a handful of friends decided to wander into town for the parade. My mind was blown by the sheer number of people marching, cheering from the sidelines and having the time of their lives.I paused a moment to look around and see how much joy it brought to people’s lives. I remember thinking that everyone has their own story to tell, their own journey behind and in front of them. Being there to celebrate this was powerful.But like Norrie, Mardi Gras 2016 was his game-changer year – when he marched for the first time.Mardi Gras Parade 2010 | Photo: Richard Hedger‘I was lucky enough to march with the Northern Territory float, alongside the Sistagirls from the Tiwi Islands. Morover, having followed the Sistagirls’ efforts in just getting to the parade, I was proud to be a part of their story. Seeing their excited response to the crowds, I was transported back to a 19-year-old me. In awe of the color, music, laughter and the love that reverberates through the pre-parade gathering. Marching was a blur of excitement but I have occasional flashbacks that make me break out into a massive smile.‘Mardi Gras will always be important to the LGBTI community. It holds the history of our struggle to take our rightful place in the wider society. It celebrates diversity like no other event and it sends a positive message, to young people most of all, that it is ok to be who you are and that you belong.‘I’m convinced that the future will see the continuing evolution of Mardi Gras. The festival itself is growing and leaves no stone unturned. Massive crowds continue to turn up at the various celebratory events. The positive impact it has on the community is immeasurable.’You can buy Telling Tales on Richard’s website for more stories of the 40 Years of Sydney’s Mardi Gras.Read more:We are loving the First Nations float for the 2018 Sydney Mardi Gras GAYSTARNEWS- Got a news tip? Want to share your story? Email us . The Pride hijab is back and this time it’s going to Sydney’s Mardi Gras eTN Chatroom for Readers (join us) When the event began back in 1978, it was a challenging time for the LGBTI community. And yet 40 years later, Hedger believes, ‘We find ourselves in an equally challenging time.’The stories in Hedger’s ‘Telling Tales’ are a mixture of the familiar, famous and unsung heroes who attend the festival. Their personal accounts tell Mardi Gras’ 40-year history through a deeply personal lens.Reading them gives you a sense of how much Mardi Gras has developed since its grassroots inception.Like other pride festivals around the world, Mardi Gras has had to grow and change. For some that means embracing corporate sponsorship to ensure its survival. This has left some people craving for the community roots that drove the event’s early days.That longing for pride to return to its political roots rings loudly in many of the stories in ‘Telling Tales.’Hedger shared some of his photos of Mardi Gras, along with five portraits and excerpts from their stories with Gay Star News, to celebrate four decades of Sydney Mardi Gras.Norrie – ‘Demimondaine’Norries portrait in Telling Tales | Photo: http://www.richardhedger.comNorrie classes her self as a demi-monde: ‘a women considered to be of doubtful social standing and morality.’ And with her portrait in this book above – its hard to argue with her.Moving to Sydney in 1988, she found her first Mardi Gras in 1989 electrifying – ‘the glitter lay everywhere for weeks.’Back then Mardi Gras was about her protesting the active discrimination of LGBTI people. And now, 40 years on she says:‘We should be celebrating the (long fought for) achievement of marriage equality, whilst continuing to raise awareness of matters in relation to prejudice and socio-cultural injustice.’Mardi Gras Parade 2010 | Photo: Richard HedgerAnd Norrie’s most significant moment is also a pivotal moment in Mardi Gras’s recent history. One she sees as a positive change for it:‘In 2016 the police urged festival officials to sideline a young activist float. The officials agreed to do so and pulled the Community Action Against Homophobia (CAAH) float to the side at the starting line of the parade route.‘It would seem that some of the young people in the float had expressed their political opinion to certain MPs with whom Mardi Gras officials aspired to ingratiate favor. In my view, extracting the float was a shameful act of civil suppression whereby Mardi Gras went from a conduit for a political protest to an arena for complicity with police and politicians.‘In response, a large number of more community-minded people enrolled to vote in the Mardi Gras organization’s elections. At the next AGM, approximately half of the old Board were replaced by new voices more supportive of grassroots political engagement.’Danling – DesignerDanling’s portait in Telling Tales | Photo: http://www.richardhedger.comDanling first’s Mardi Gras was in 2008, two years after she moved to Sydney and met her first girlfriend:‘We watched the parade with friends from Oxford Street. To secure a spot, we arrived three hours before the parade was due to begin with our milk crate, water and rainbow flags at the ready. We took turns to walk around looking at the marchers and the people who dressed up. As the parade ended at 11.30pm, we would have stood on the street for over seven hours. Yet none of us complained or noticed the passing of time.’Mardi Gras Parade 2010 | Photo: Richard Hedger‘The most significant year for me was 2017 when I watched the parade from The Oxford hotel with my partner. Heaps Gay’s boombox float and aerobic dancers in their neon outfits reminded us of the positive impact Heaps Gay has on our community.‘I attend Mardi Gras every year now and will continue to do so to be a part of this meaningful event. I always take photos of the floats and the crowds for my parents in China, to show them there is no shame in having a daughter who is in love with another woman. My parents always delight in the photos. Therefore, Ffrom that perspective, Mardi Gras has inspired my family. But I believe it has for many others as well. And allows them to rethink the meaning of acceptance, equality, and love.’Tobin aka Vanessa Wagner – Educator and ‘Professional Show-off’Toby aka Vanessa’s portrait in Telling Tales 40 years of Sydney Mardis Gras | Photo: http://www.richardhedger.comIn 1986 Toby went to the Sydney Gay Youth Group that met in Chippendale. It was a mixed-gender social group who hung out on Saturday afternoons.‘It was a chance to meet people outside of the bars and we sometimes had elders talk to us about Queer history. But, we also went on the odd excursion. Safety in numbers was a good thing back then.Although being gay was decriminalized in 1984, Toby tells the book ‘the vestige of hate and violence was still close and at times pungent. The streets were dangerous, the media ugly and the dreaded ‘AIDS’ was fuelling a new level of hate. This is not the sort of climate to build self-esteem!And that’s what inspired an act of solidarity, celebration, and courage that became his most significant memory.‘The Sydney Gay Youth Group made a colorful and rudimentary structural creation on the back of a ute and I dressed up in a Bauhaus-inspired costume made of colorfully painted foam. I recall I made a strange piece of headgear too! The other young people dressed in all sorts of outfits and it was a true expression of youthful diversity.‘It was so exciting getting the float ready and even more so on the afternoon of the parade. Once night fell and we trundled up Oxford Street we felt thrilled, validated and loved. The idea of shutting down the main street for a big show-off/party/protest is just gold!’ Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… Read the full article on Gaystarnews:  :https://www.gaystarnews.com/article/most-significant-mardi-gras-memory/last_img read more

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first_imgAftermathAccording to The Advocate, Saavedra denies knowing the woman she harassed. She also continued to misgender the woman while speaking to Advocate reporters.‘I was feeling afraid of being inside the bathroom with a man,’ Saavedra told The Advocate. ‘I didn’t know he was gay [sic], I just heard the voice was a man. Another customer approached me and said that they were scared to go into the restroom because there was a voice of a man inside, and so I told the manager.’The Advocate contacted Denny’s corporate communications department, but did not receive a response.This particular Denny’s location was just about five miles from the Los Angeles LGBT Center, on Vermont Ave. and Wilshire Blvd.‘[Harassing the trans woman] has nothing to do with the LGBT agenda, he’s a man, simple as that, we were afraid to be in the bathroom,’ Saavedra said, apparently not aware of the fact the T in LGBT stands for transgender.‘I don’t even know if he was a transgender; he was a man talking with a man’s voice, it was a man. I was in danger, everyone was in danger. This is a family values issue. We put our little girls in danger, this is not safe for our families.’The realityThere has never been a case of a transgender woman harassing or attacking someone in public restrooms in the United States.In the last year, the United States, emboldened by the Trump administration, has introduced 125 anti-LGBTI bills. Many of them are aimed specifically at transgender people.‘Ignorance is not the sole province of one party or political perspective,’ Los Angeles LGBT Center Chief of Staff Darrel Cummings said in a statement following the incident. ‘But the current Administration has emboldened people to express their ignorance and hatred in a way that is so odious and shameful that we are required time and again to actively resist.’‘That a candidate for Congress can express such outrageous and callous disregard for another human being clearly demonstrates that she is not fit for public office. But just to be clear in case Ms. Saavedra does not get the message, ignorance, fear-mongering and harassment have no place in a country founded on principles of equality and mutual respect. On this International Day Against Homophobia, Transphobia, and Biphobia, let this candidate’s disgraceful behavior be a rallying cry for us all to stand up for what is right.’Watch the full interaction below:Got a news tip? Want to share your story? Email us . Read the full article on Gaystarnews:  :https://www.gaystarnews.com/article/watch-trans-woman-harassed-out-of-bathroom-by-california-congressional-candidate/ Jazmina Saavedra, a Republican running to represent South Los Angeles in the House of Representatives, harassed a transgender woman in a Denny’s restroom.Saavedra live streamed the whole encounter on Facebook on Tuesday, 15 May. In the video, she slams former President Obama’s support for trans people. Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… GAYSTARNEWS- The interactionWearing a Trump sweatshirt and carrying a selfie stick, Saavedra storms into the women’s restroom and starts yelling at an unidentified woman.A man in the video, described as the manager at Denny’s, was already stationed in the women’s restroom, standing outside the stall where the trans woman was hiding.‘Why [are] you using the ladies’ room?’ Saavedra screams at the trans woman from outside the stall.‘You’re invading my privacy,’ the trans woman responds.Saavedra retorts: ‘You’re invading my privacy because I am a woman!’‘I’m in the toilet,’ the trans woman replies. ‘How am I invading your privacy?’The manager attempts to get Saavedra to leave the restroom as she yells, ‘you’re violating my rights! You’re sick, stupid.’While walking back to her table at the restaurant, Saavedra says, ‘So that guy violated my right to use the ladies’ room here. He’s saying he’s a lady. Stupid guy. I’m going to wait for him to get out of the restroom.’Soon, she heads back to the women’s restroom and stands outside, aiming her camera at the door.‘This is so stupid in California,’ Saavedra says to her Facebook viewers. ‘You let people say, “I’m a lady. He’s a man.” This is what the politicians, the sick politicians, approve. They put us in danger, a woman like me.’A couple minutes later, the trans woman emerges from the restroom followed by the manager.‘You’re invading my privacy,’ Saavedra says to the woman as she passes.‘Excuse me? I was using the toilet. How did I invade your privacy?’ she responds.The trans woman apparently recognized Saavedra from a previous encounter. In the video, she says Saavedra had followed her before.‘Next time use the men’s room,’ Saavedra said as she followed the woman to the exit.After the trans woman leaves the restaurant, Saavedra jokes about how she was ready to use her pepper spray. ‘I was looking for my stun gun.’ eTN Chatroom for Readers (join us)last_img read more

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first_imgeTN Chatroom for Readers (join us) Read the full article on Gaystarnews:  :https://www.gaystarnews.com/article/navy-premier-drag-queen-action/ Tyler John first shared Kelley’s story for the Navy, before sharing it with GSN. John is a journalist for the US Navy and the USS Ronald Reagan Public Affairs Officer for our Gay, Lesbian and Supporting Sailors (GLASS) association.Kelley was doing drag before the military became a new reality for him.‘Drag was too costly of a road to go down at the time because I had college loans and living expenses to overcome,’ he originally told John.He knew, however, of what the military could offer. His father served in the Navy for 24 years as a counselor.‘Knowing the benefits of enlisting, I would be able to gain a more comfortable lifestyle to support myself and my future in drag.’Harpy in a performance onboard | Photo: ProvidedExploring his drag personaAs John describes: ‘Kelley’s hard work, determination and attention to detail is rivaled only by the dedication he has to his drag life.’Kelley first began doing drag when he was 16, inspired by RuPaul’s Drag Race.‘I never knew a man could embrace his femininity in a creative and entertaining way like that and I knew it’s what I wanted to do,’ he explained.‘When I put on a face, it’s a face of art and creativity, not just a face of make-up. To hear people cheer, laugh or cry, or even join in with you during a performance is an absolute thrill. The best thing about it is that it allows me to inspire others by just being who I am today.’ Joshua Kelley in his uniform | Photo: Provided GAYSTARNEWS-center_img Yeoman 3rd Class Joshua Kelley is challenging what it means to be a service member in the United States military. By day, he serves in the Navy as Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 115’s administrative supervisor. As night falls, he assumes his drag queen persona — Harpy Daniels, Miss Gay Harrisburg America 2015. A drag family took Kelley in as he began exploring his lifestyle and identity.Tequila Daniels, who has more than 19 years of drag experience, became Kelley’s drag mother.‘Harpy had a spark within her,’ she told John of Kelley’s drag identity. ‘She was able to grab an audience’s attention and hold it, which is not as easy as some may think.’Showing off the skills | Photo: ProvidedBalancing different lifestylesKelley is now based in Japan and has less time to pursue his drag life, along with his military commitment.And he is committed.Cmdr. Samuel Gray, former commanding officer of VFA 115, wrote of him: ‘Kelley has performed his demanding duties in an exemplary and highly professional manner and demonstrated tremendous initiative and attention to detail.’Previously, he also won the Navy’s Blue Jacket award for excellence as a sailor.Still, on the weekends, he finds time to keep his passion alive.‘I practice different make-up techniques by experimenting with different styles of drag make-up. I plan different looks through costuming and hairstyling for future performances, as well as rehearse choreography to new songs.’With this current administration’s attacks on service members, both transgender people and those who are HIV positive, Kelley is a shining light of inspiration and defiance.Got a news tip? Want to share your story? Email us . Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading…last_img read more

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first_imgCancun, Q.R. — One man has died and another injured after shots were fired on a beach of the mainland of Isla Mujeres.The mainland area of the municipality of Isla Mujeres registered its first murder of the year after a man was shot and killed on a beach in front of the Riu Dunamar Hotel.According to reports, the man shot was a street vendor. The shooting occurred Tuesday at 8:30 a.m. after he was targeted by an unknown subject who reportedly shot at him several times. The shooting took place on the beach in front of the lifeguard tower of the Rui Dunamar hotel.During the shooting, a hotel lifeguard was injured, receiving a gunshot wound. Both were taken to a nearby hospital. The street vendor later died from his injuries. The lifeguard was voluntarily released from hospital the same day.The deceased has been identified as Manuel Guillermo N.An investigation by Ministerial Police revealed that more than 10 casings were lifted by hotel security employees and moved more than 100 meters away, altering the crime scene. The move was reportedly to try cover the image of the hotel.Unofficial sources said the attack could be related to the sale of drugs in the beach area.Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)last_img read more

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