October 16, 2019
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Friends, family and dignitaries paid their last respects to Warrant Officer Patrice Vincent on Saturday.Prime Minister Stephen Harper, NDP leader Thomas Mulcair and liberal leader Justin Trudeau attended the private service in Longueuil, Quebec.53-year old Vincent and a colleague were run down by a Jihadist sympathizer in Quebec on October 20th.Police say it was a deliberate attack by Martin Couture-Rouleau, who was eventually shot dead.Vincent’s military career spanned 28 years at nine bases across the country.He was working as a member of the military’s personnel support staff in the IT department in Saint-Hubert.Vincent’s death came two days before Hamilton Reservist Corporal Nathan Cirillo was gunned down at the National War Memorial.

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Hamilton police are looking for two men who allegedly robbed a pharmacy at gunpoint on Hamilton Mountain.Shortly after 10:30 a.m. on April 12, two men walked into the Guardian Pharmacy on Redmond Dr.Police say the suspects “displayed weapons believed to be a firearm and a knife” and demanded drugs from the employees.The men stole a large quantity of drugs, including fentanyl patches. Police officers and members of the K-9 Unit searched the area but were unable to find the suspects.Hamilton police are asking anyone who may be able to identify the suspects in the images to contact Det. Constable Ryan Hay at 905-546-8938.

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Canadian Press Alberta’s climate change strategy revealed by 660 NEWS Staff Posted Nov 22, 2015 5:05 pm MDT Last Updated Nov 22, 2015 at 5:39 pm MDT AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to TwitterTwitterShare to FacebookFacebookShare to RedditRedditShare to 電子郵件Email Premier Rachel Notley unveiled her NDP government’s climate change strategy on Sunday in Edmonton.The premier said Alberta needs to change, and once again become a leader in the country. She said the strategy focuses on creating a sustainable, strong and visionary energy sector in Alberta.The strategy calls for a carbon tax, that would start at $20 per tonne of greenhouse gases produced in 2017, and increase to $30 per tonne by 2018.“We’re going to reduce pollution by putting a price on it. We all contribute to carbon pollution, and we can all be part of the solution,” Notley said. “By we, I mean industry and mining. I mean all of us in our cars. I mean the many ways we currently burn carbon and put it in the atmosphere for our children to breathe.”All of the revenue generated from the tax will be put back into the province, although it isn’t clear where the money will then be allocated.The government will also implement an accelerated phase-out of coal.“We will phase out all coal emissions by 2030, and we will encourage the generation of clean, renewable electricity in its place,” Notley said.The other big announcement made by the premier was a cap on greenhouse gas emissions created by the oil sands industry.Currently, oil sands generate about 70 megatonnes of carbon a year. The NDP will legislate an emissions limit of 100 megatonnes.“The simple fact is this,” Notley said. “Alberta can’t let its emissions grow without limit, but we can grow our economy by applying technology to reduce our carbon output per barrel. That is what this limit will promote.”Notley is off to Ottawa on Monday to meet with the prime minister, as well as other provincial and territorial leaders. She will then head to Paris the following week, for the United Nations climate change conference.Officials with the Broadbent Institute, a think tank founded by former NDP leader Ed Broadbent, called the plan a “game changer”.Executive director with Broadbent, Rick Smith, told 660 NEWS, the health of Albertans will benefit from the phasing out of coal-fired power generation.“The Canadian Medical Association has calculated that because Alberta still derives much of its electricity from the burning of dirty coal, unless something changes between now and 2030, thousands of Albertans will die prematurely; thousands of Albertans will visit emergency rooms with smog-related illnesses,” Broadbent said.Smith added, the creation of a comprehensive energy efficiency program will be an enormous employment generator and save Albertans money on their electricity bills.The executive director of the Alberta Energy Efficiency Alliance, Jesse Rowe, also weighed in on the announcement.“From an energy efficiency perspective, the announcement was quite good,” Rowe said. “We haven’t been doing very much on energy efficiency in the province for about 20 years now and this brings us into line with what every other province is doing on the file.”Mike Hudema with Greenpeace Canada called the climate plan a pretty historic step after years of rejection from previous governments.“The government finally listened to people demanding climate action; what we’re going to see is a plan that will start to slowly reduce Alberta’s emissions will allow Alberta to create jobs, diversify its economy and start taking advantage of the tremendous renewable energy potential the province has to offer,” Hudema said.However, he did express concern over the lack of short or long-term emission reduction targets, but that Greenpeace will work with the government to try and create targets, and ensure they live up to what science is telling us we need to do. read more

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Marlins+1.44-0.08+0.19 SENTIMENT SCORE Red Sox+0.63-0.27-0.12 Twins+0.41-0.03-0.10 Pirates+0.92-0.13-0.07 Reds+0.58-0.04-0.22 Rangers+0.24-0.78-0.08 Orioles+0.43-0.07+0.08 Giants+0.50-0.04+0.05 Baseball teams have a way of dragging their fans’ moods with their fortunes on the field. It’s no fun to root for a perpetually losing team, especially if its performance seems unlikely to improve. Conversely, an unexpected contender has a way of lifting one’s spirits.But wins and losses are much easier to measure than happiness. We do have a proxy, though: the masses at Reddit. I scraped comments from each team’s subreddit1Using this script to get text from specific subreddits. on the website and determined how happy their comments were.2In technical terms, the valence of each subreddit, or how positive it was. To do this, I used the AFINN-111 word list, which was assembled by Finn Arup Nielsen in 2011. To do that I used sentiment analysis, collecting the words used by each fan base to determine their overall level of joy. More positive words (“win,” “wow,” “wonderful”) point to a happier fan base, and more negative words (“unimpressed,” “miserable,” “wrong”) suggest the opposite.Here are some highlights of what I found (a full table is at the bottom of this post):There are some caveats, as there always are with sentiment analysis. The word list I used was calibrated to a sentiment analysis of Twitter — it’s possible that language is used differently on Reddit, and so the sentiment scores may not be as calibrated to the medium as they would be if we had Reddit-centric sentiment scoring. For example, the word “damn” is rated as strongly negative, since it is usually a negative exclamation (“damn, we lost again”). However, it can also be used in a positive sense: “damn, that was our fifth straight win, we are pretty good.” And maybe people on Reddit “damn” more positively than the hordes on Twitter. (The same can go for any word used atypically in any sentence, making its meaning different from how the algorithm interpreted it.) Also, people who write on Reddit do not constitute a random sample of a team’s fans.But let’s get back to the results. Hope springs eternal in the offseason but is extinguished for many fan bases by July.3All measurements come from three time periods: one preseason (Feb. 15 to March 15), one pre-trade-deadline (June 15 to July 15), and one crossing the trade deadline (July 15 to Aug. 15). That makes sense given how many teams don’t have any hope left. In the preseason, only one team — the Phillies — had playoff odds less than 1 percent, per FanGraphs. Now, 11 teams have odds less than 1 percent. Sentiment scores per word — our index of happiness — tended to be between 0.3 and 1 on the sentiment scale in the offseason, indicating that the average word was a positive one (between a neutral word and the word “agreement”). Nowadays, the same scores have plunged. Clearly the grind of the MLB season wears on the fans’ happiness as it does the players.Every fan base lost some of its happiness from the preseason, save one: the Chicago Cubs, who increased their sentiment score by a bit. The Cubs have not only been contenders in the crowded National League Central, they have also seen a number of top prospects called up, most notably Kris Bryant (but also Addison Russell and Kyle Schwarber). Not only are the Cubs contending a little earlier than expected — the future is even brighter.All other teams’ fans have become much less happy since February, but not all by the same amount. The change in sentiment score from February to July is roughly in proportion to the change in playoff odds of each team.4The correlation coefficient is r = -.3, which is not quite significant. Teams that made strides in their playoff hopes such as the Yankees, Angels and Dodgers have seen the smallest declines in sentiment since February. At the other end of the spectrum, teams such as the Mariners, Athletics and Padres have seen their playoff odds tumble. Their fan bases also have had some of the most pronounced declines in sentiment scores per word.From July to August, sentiment scores were steady, fluctuating about four times less than they did from February to July.5The Pearson correlation value was a strong .746. The trade deadline didn’t seem to do much to move the needle in terms of fan happiness, but the teams that did gain are mostly the ones you’d expect: the Blue Jays (who strengthened their roster enormously), the Cardinals (who locked down a playoff spot) and a few others who were riding winning streaks. On the other side, the Tigers lost happiness, witnessing their championship window close and their highly regarded general manager leave.Although on-field success can buy happiness, it doesn’t seem to work for every team. The Royals have gained the most playoff probability of any team since the preseason, but they lost the fourth-most happiness from the offseason to July. There are any number of potential reasons6Including the All-Star controversy, an injury to their star player (Alex Gordon), and enmity from other teams/fan bases. for the relative grumpiness of Royals fans, but one may be that fans were more optimistic about the Royals than the projection systems. While contention in Kansas City may seem surprising to sabermetricians, it may not to Royals fans who were riding high off a World Series appearance.Conversely, failure on the field isn’t necessarily enough to dissuade a happy fan base. The Phillies, hopeless since the beginning of the year, nevertheless have fans who aren’t that much sadder than they were before the season. Despite the loss of erstwhile ace Cole Hamels at the trade deadline, fans have gotten happier since July — his trade and others signaled a shift in direction for the team toward rebuilding. As above with the Cubs, fan bases seem to not only weigh the present but also to consider the prospect for future improvement.There are also some inexplicable cases such as that of the Rays, whose fan base declined in sentiment much more dramatically than their playoff odds would lead one to expect. It’s possible that the Rays’ 4-8 slide in July before the All-Star break had something to do with it, or the seven-game losing streak from June 28 to July 4. The streaks, winning and losing, may play havoc with fans’ emotions, causing people to see false patterns suggesting imminent decline in what is mostly random fluctuation.Obviously, we’re grasping for answers as to why fans are happier or sadder as the season goes by. But the general trend seems to be that a complex calculus of current performance and hope for the future dictates how happy each team’s fan base feels. Of course, it all resets come March. Hang tight, Reds fans. Only a few more months to go. Cubs+0.49+0.74+0.84 Rockies+0.88+0.13+0.12 Mariners+1.07-0.38-0.35 Indians+0.66+0.05-0.02 Angels+0.28+0.21+0.08 Dodgers+0.29+0.07-0.15 Tigers+0.55+0.15-0.11 Brewers+0.71-0.29-0.06 Mets+0.23-0.19-0.04 Rays+2.24+0.04+0.27 Nationals+0.61-0.11-0.18 Yankees+0.90+0.62+0.74 Royals+0.85-0.27-0.20 Braves+0.46+0.11+0.08 Cardinals+0.44-0.26-0.02 TEAMFEBRUARYJULYAUGUST White Sox+0.940.00-0.07 Padres+0.94-0.11+0.13 Diamondbacks+0.28+0.04+0.17 Blue Jays+0.28-0.03+0.21 Astros+0.87+0.09+0.11 Athletics+0.62+0.10+0.10 Phillies+0.35+0.05+0.35 read more

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first_img“That information could be the key to solving this murder.” An insurance executive shot dead in a raid on his £1million home could have been killed by drug addicts from a charity where his partner volunteered, it has been claimed.Peter Hedger, 61, who was known as Guy, died after being blasted with a shotgun at his luxury home on the edge of the New Forest in Dorset in the early hours of Sunday.Police believe he and his partner, 48-year-old Simon-Pierre Hedger-Cooper, had been deliberately targeted for high-value jewellery and designer watches stored in their detached home in Castlewood, St Ives. It emerged on Wednesday that Mr Hedger-Cooper – the victim’s partner of 12 years – had spent years supporting homeless youngsters as a director at The Clock Tower Sanctuary, which runs a drop-in centre in Brighton.”The vast majority who use the centre are just desperate people who have fallen on tough times,” The Sun reported a source saying of the charity.”But it’s also used by some with severe drug problems who would have a motive to carry out this kind of crime. “Maybe they caught a glimpse of his watch and found out how wealthy they were. Whoever did this targeted them.”Armed with a shotgun and wearing balaclavas, at least two burglars broke into the couple’s property in the secluded cul-de-sac, which police believe they had been staking out.The timing of the raid also suggested a high degree of planning, with the attackers waiting until the streetlights went off after 1am, before making their move. Detectives believe the intruders had been staking out the couple's property in the secluded cul-de-sac in Castlewood, Dorset A police search dog is used in the hunt for cluesCredit:Andrew Matthews/PA A police search dog is used in the hunt for clues Detectives believe the intruders had been staking out the couple’s property in the secluded cul-de-sac in Castlewood, DorsetCredit:Bliss Aviation/BNPS Detectives said Mr Hedger-Cooper, who was in the house at the time of the raid, has been deeply affected by the incident and is being supported by specially-trained officers.In a statement released by police, Mr Hedger’s victim’s family said: “Guy was a caring and compassionate partner, son, brother and uncle who lived life to its full and enriched the lives of all those who knew him.”We are devastated that Guy’s life has been cut short in this way. Guy will be sorely missed by family, friends and colleagues, but he will live in our hearts forever. We ask for time to grieve in peace.”Detectives believe there may have been an element of pre-planning involved and would like to hear from anyone who may have seen people or vehicles acting suspiciously in the area directly before or during the days or hours leading up to the incident. Police close to Guy Hedger’s homeCredit:Andrew Matthews /PA Maybe they caught a glimpse of his watch and found out how wealthy they wereSource Dorset Police received a call at 3.03am reporting that Mr Hedger had been blasted with a shotgun. He was pronounced dead shortly after arriving at hospital. Police close to Guy Hedger's home Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. A spokesman for insurance company Liverpool Victoria (LV) paid tribute to Mr Hedger.”An extremely talented marketer, Guy was instrumental in building the LV  brand and he will be sorely missed by many,” he said.Mr Hedger was a director of the Avonbourne International Business and Enterprise Trust, which runs colleges and a primary school in the Bournemouth area.Chief executive Debbie Godfrey-Phaure said: “Guy was a very kind and generous man who volunteered and gave his time freely to Avonbourne.”She added: “Guy had a deep passion for education and was dedicated to expanding the experience and knowledge of children in Bournemouth.”Everyone at the trust will miss his guiding hand, friendship and the wonderful service he provided us.” Detective Chief Inspector Sarah Derbyshire said: “This was a truly horrific crime and our deepest sympathies go out to Guy’s family and friends. Our thoughts remain with you all.”I want to reassure the public that we have the best detectives, officers and staff working day and night on this case.”The violent offenders responsible for this crime are still at large and we are doing everything in our power to bring these individuals to justice.”I would ask the public to please get in touch with us if you have any information you think may be relevant to this investigation no matter how small you believe it to be.last_img read more

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The remains were stored before a 2006 change in the law which made it illegal to remove or store human tissue without consent. Detective Chief Superintendent Mary Doyle said: “This is a deeply sensitive and private matter for the families affected and the decision to contact them was not taken lightly”. A spokesman for the Greater Manchester mayor’s office said it was a “deeply distressing matter” and it had been raised with the chief constable of Greater Manchester Police, Ian Hopkins.Asked why all of Leah’s body had not been handed over in the first instance, a spokeswoman said: “Prior to the implementation of the Human Tissue Act 2004, samples were sent for testing from all forces to leading experts across the country. Regrettably there were occasions where those samples were not reconciled with families. Leah Aldridge in hospital before her deathCredit:Janine Aldridge “Only a few weeks ago yet more body parts were discovered by the police and the family had to go through the ordeal of a third funeral.”Officials from the Home Office are now set to investigate the case. Leah’s family is one of 180 cases where tissue from crime victims has been retained by the police force without their family’s permission.  Want the best of The Telegraph direct to your email and WhatsApp? Sign up to our free twice-daily  Front Page newsletter and new  audio briefings. “The implementation of the Human Tissue Act gave clarity to forces nationally on how tissue samples should be dealt with. “Today samples continue to be sent to labs across the UK but in line with the Act are now returned to the next of kin or sensitively disposed of as per their wishes.” The casket used for Leah’s third funeral, this yearCredit:Janine Aldridge  A family had to hold three funerals for a baby after a police body parts blunder, it has emerged.15 years after Leah Aldridge was killed by her father, her family was told last year that Greater Manchester Police had retained parts of her body without their consent. But a year later her mother Janine Aldridge was told that there were yet more parts that had not been handed over.Ms Aldridge’s MP Chris Green said her family now has “no confidence” that the baby, who was five weeks old when she died, has finally been laid to rest. Ms Aldridge, who was 16 when she lost her daughter, said family friends had helped her investigate the situation herself after the second funeral, because she did not trust that she had been able to bury her properly.Calling the experience “horrific”, she said: “I’m not sleeping with it all, because I’m just constantly thinking that it’s not all of Leah that we have got back.” Janine Aldridge called the experience 'horrific' Janine Aldridge called the experience ‘horrific’Credit:Janine Aldridge Leah suffered brain damage and died at Christmas 2002 after she was shaken by her father Andrew Ashurst, who was later jailed, while Ms Aldridge slept upstairs. Mr Green told the House of Commons: “Last year the police discovered they had retained some of Leah’s body parts and these were returned to the family for a second funeral. The casket used for Leah's third funeral, this year Leah Aldridge in hospital before her death read more

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first_imgL’iguane bleu, sauvé de justesse de l’extinction totaleDe puissantes ONG américaines et britanniques ont réussi à tirer d’affaire l’iguane bleu, endémique des îles Caïman, passé en quelques années grâce à l’élevage en captivité, d’un effectif de moins de 25 individus en liberté à quelque 500, après des réintroductions en milieu naturel.Coordonné par l’ONG britannique National Trust, le programme de sauvetage de l’iguane bleu des îles Caïman – un consortium de partenaires locaux et internationaux – a réussi à relâcher dans la nature plus de 500 reptiles élevés en captivité. Et ce, depuis la création de l’initiative, en 2002, année où la population sauvage de ces iguanes atteignait moins de deux douzaines de spécimens.À lire aussiCes 18 animaux méconnus à l’aspect étonnant pourraient disparaître avant vousFred Burton, directeur du Programme, explique : “Nous nous attendons à atteindre notre objectif de 1 000 iguanes vivant à l’état sauvage dans des aires protégées et gérées, d’ici quelques années. Après cela, nous allons surveiller ces iguanes pour nous assurer qu’ils se reproduisent en nombre suffisant pour maintenir la population sauvage. Si nous obtenons des résultats positifs, nous aurons réussi”.L’iguane bleu de Grand Caïman est la plus grande des espèces indigènes de son île homonyme, atteignant parfois 1,50 mètre pour une douzaine de kilos. Anciennement présent dans la plupart des régions côtières et des terres broussailleuses sèches de l’intérieur de l’île, il avait vu sa population réduite à 10 ou 20 individus seulement il y a dix ans à peine, à cause de la destruction des habitats, de la mortalité liée aux automobiles et de la prédation par les chiens et les chats introduits.Le 24 juillet 2011 à 10:07 • Maxime Lambertlast_img read more

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first_imgLeicester City manager Claude Puel who is already used to playing in the Champions League during his career has emphasized the importance of ambition being included as part of the competition.Following their Premier League title heroics, Puel’s team featured in Europe’s elite competition during the 2016-17 season.On the other hand, Leicester greets West Ham to the King Power on Saturday, having grabbed nine points without reaching the top four places.“When I was a player or when I was a manager in France I managed and played a lot of international games – Champions League games, Europa League,” Puel said via Sky Sport.“It’s important to have the ambition and I hope for the club to find this competition again.Harry Maguire, Manchester UnitedLiverpool legend Nicol slams Harry Maguire’s Man United form Andrew Smyth – September 14, 2019 Steve Nicol believes Harry Maguire has made some “horrendous mistakes” recently, and has failed to find his best form since joining Manchester United.“I hope we can find this level again. When I look at the games on Tuesday and Wednesday nights it’s hard. I would like to find the possibility again with this club.“If we continue to work with consistency and stability, why not?“When Leicester were champions, the season after it was difficult to have the consistency in Premier League and Europe.“When the club doesn’t have the habits to play every three days it’s difficult to maintain good results. Leicester needs to go step-by-step, to find good stability.”last_img read more

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first_imgSEATTLE — A new report says the Seattle area’s average rent increase of 6 percent a year is among the highest anywhere.Seattle area apartment rents rose faster in the past year than in 81 other major U.S. metropolitan areas, The Seattle Times reported in Saturday’s newspaper.Reis, a New York-based company that sells data to the commercial real-estate industry reports the average asking rent in the Seattle area climbed 6 percent in the past 12 months, outpacing cities like San Francisco and Boston. The study extended from King County to North Marysville in Snohomish County.Across all apartment sizes, the Seattle area’s average asking rent in the second quarter was $1,150.Another firm’s data put Seattle’s rent increases at fourth-highest in the nation, up from sixth just three months earlier, but agrees with the 6 percent growth rate.According to Reis, rents in the Seattle area grew more than twice as fast as the national average of 2.6 percent.Strong job growth has fueled record demand for apartments, pushing vacancy rates down to very low levels.“It’s all about the jobs,” said Kenny Dudunakis, senior partner at Hendricks-Berkadia, one of the nation’s largest apartment-investment advisers.“People love the Fortune 500 companies that are here that seem to be on a perpetual hiring mode,” he said.Another research firm, Dallas-based MPF Research, also reports that apartments in the Seattle-Tacoma area saw a 6 percent increase in effective rent in the second quarter.Within the Seattle region, there’s a wide range of increases. MPF, which samples half the apartments in the area, found annual effective rent increases in the second quarter ranging from 4 percent in Federal Way to 10 percent in Issaquah.last_img read more

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first_imgPALMETTO BAY, Fla. (WSVN) — 7News’ Today in Florida anchor Christine Cruz and her daughter sang the national anthem for the Village of Palmetto Bay, Wednesday evening.Cruz and her daughter Leah were honored to sing the national anthem for local lawmakers who were giving the State of the Village address.Cruz said she was “honored to sing the star-spangled banner with my little star.”Copyright 2019 Sunbeam Television Corp. All rights reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten or redistributed.last_img

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first_imgOsmania University: Members of PDSU Vijrumbhana said that the corporate institutions like Chennai Amrutha were running their hotel management colleges against regulations of UGC, during a press meet held at OU Guest House on Tuesday. They criticised Telangana State Council of Higher Education for not taking any action against such forces and expressed worry over career of students. They demanded officials of education department to take stringent action against such institutions. Leaders Tony, Ranjith, Bhoopal, Tirupati, Mahesh and others were present.last_img

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first_imgAngelina Jolie and her son Pax arrive for the 75th Golden Globe AwardsVALERIE MACON/AFP/Getty ImagesBrad Pitt and Angelina Jolie are close to finalising their long divorce proceedings. Angelina Jolie is currently shooting for a new movie in New Mexico and has taken her six children along with her. Does this mean that Brad Pitt is missing the children as he is not getting some quality time to spend with them?Well, as per a recent Hollywood Life report, Angelina Jolie has reportedly set up a second home in Albuquerque, New Mexico, where she is shooting for a new movie, Those Who Wish Me Dead. An alleged eyewitness stated that Brad Pitt’s ex-wife is not letting her work come in between her family time.”[Angelina’s kids] love going on location with her, it’s what they’ve always known,” the alleged eyewitness stated. “They’re spending the majority of their time in Albuquerque now, but they’ve already made several trips back to LA. It’s a very quick flight on a private jet so it’s an easy commute.”In addition to this, the insider contended that no one, in particular, knows that Angelina Jolie is down south with her children and this gives them a lot of privacy and extra freedom which they all deserve.Ever since Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt decided to part ways in September 2016, several outlets talked about the life of Angelina’s six children. The divorce proceedings have been tough on everyone who is closely involved with all of this. Staying in New Mexico with her children, away from all the media and press would have been amazing for Angelina Jolie.”People mostly leave them alone wherever they go in town. It’s very obvious that they’re enjoying the change because they’ve all been smiling so much more lately, they seem very happy,” the insider further added. Brad Pitt and Leonardo DiCaprio at Cannes Film FestivalTwitterAs per the report, Brad Pitt was missing his children and even came to meet all of them on May 15.Meanwhile, Those Who Wish Me Dead movie will feature Angelina Jolie sharing screen space with Nicholas Hoult. The upcoming thriller movie is written and directed by Taylor Sheridan and is a female neo-Western movie set against a wildfire in the Montana wilderness. Apart from this, fans will soon get to see Brad Pitt in a Western movie as well. The acclaimed star will be seen sharing space-time with Leonardo DiCaprio in the upcoming Once Upon a Time in Hollywood.last_img read more

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first_img X Share 00:00 /14:42 One of the victims was treated by paramedics. Another victim, 21-year-old Joe Eodice, was in the hospital for about a week recovering from his injuries. Haltom, 20, died at the scene. Hannah McBride/Texas STMiguel Navarro was certified and tried as an adult after committing a crime at age 15. Moon v. StateIn 2008, 16-year-old Cameron Moon shot and killed Christopher Seabreak, 20, in a drug deal gone awry. Moon was tried as an adult, convicted, and sentenced to 30 years in prison.Appealing his conviction, his attorneys argued that Moon should never have been tried as an adult in the first place – that the courts needed to show a good reason why he was not able to be rehabilitated before they could send him to an adult prison.In the end, the courts agreed. The case created a precedent, changing how the state views juveniles in the criminal justice system. The opinion stated that juvenile judges can’t transfer children to criminal court “merely for the sake of judicial economy. … Such a notion is the very antithesis of the kind of individualized assessment of the propriety of waiver of juvenile jurisdiction [expected] of the juvenile court in the exercise of its transfer discretion.”The Moon decision put state legislators into action. In 2015, they passed Senate Bill 888, a law that said juvenile defendants could appeal their certification before they went to trial as an adult. Going forward, kids who had been tried as adults would get a chance to repeal that decision before having to go through a full trial in criminal court, giving them the opportunity to stay in the juvenile system.Michele Deitch, a professor with the Lyndon B. Johson School of Public Affairs at the University of Texas at Austin, specializes in criminal justice policy. She says the Moon case changed the playbook for juveniles in court.“It is a very rare – and should be a very rare occurrence – to put a youth in the adult criminal justice system,” Deitch says. “What Moon does is to better ensure that the system is in fact only allowing the most serious, and dangerous, and irredeemable youth to make it to that point in the system – where they are transferred to the adult court. And if that is to happen, it’s making sure that there is a fair process that allows an appellate court to look at this and decide if a decision was fairly made.”Navarro had written Matheson to ask him to look over the Moon case but Matheson had never heard of it. Matheson wanted to look at the transfer orders from Moon’s and Navarro’s certifications side by side.“I remember staring at the first paragraph and saying ‘That’s familiar,’” Matheson says. “Second paragraph: ‘Ok, they are saying the same thing.’ I’m sort of getting more and more excited as I went through the orders. By the end, I think I immediately got on the computer and emailed the team, said ‘Guys, you have to read these two orders!’ I attached the two orders – and lots of exclamation points.”One of the grounds for Navarro’s appeal deals with the specific language from his certification, also known as a waiver of jurisdiction. In a memo to the court filed with his case, Navarro’s lawyers lay out six passages from Moon’s waiver that use much of the same language as the juvenile judge used in Navarro’s waiver. Neither includes supporting information to back up the judge’s conclusions.In other words, the juvenile court didn’t show its work by setting out sufficient evidence in Navarro’s waiver. This notion of requiring the court to “show its work” is at the heart of the Moon decision. So the argument from Moon suggests Navarro shouldn’t have been transferred to adult court at all.Essentially, Navarro and his attorneys argue that the same thing that happened to Moon happened in his case: that he had been sped through the process to try him as an adult. Listen To embed this piece of audio in your site, please use this code:  99 Years The morning after the party, Navarro was arrested and charged with murder. Since his family was poor, he relied on a court-appointed defense attorney.The prosecution wanted to try 15-year-old Navarro as an adult. Before a juvenile can be tried as an adult, the juvenile court must hold a hearing and certify a set of criteria laid out by the state. If the court decides that a juvenile can be tried as an adult, the judge then submits a waiver of jurisdiction – sometimes referred to as a transfer order – to waive the juvenile court’s jurisdiction over the case and transfer the juvenile to an adult criminal court.During Navarro’s five-day hearing in Fort Bend County’s juvenile court, administrators at Katy Junior High, where he went to school, took the stand. They testified that he read at a fourth-grade level but could do 12th-grade math. He had flunked twice. He skipped class and got into fights. A few months before the stabbing, a fight on the bus had landed him on probation.During his certification hearing, Navarro’s prosecutor, Fort Bend district attorney Tyra McCollum, said that the law says transferring a child to adult court is up to the judge’s discretion. But in this case, the judge had no choice, McCollum said.“I believe that justice says that transfer of this young man is, in fact, mandatory, not discretionary,” McCollum told the judge. “It is mandatory because the facts surrounding this case suggest that there is no other remedy other than transfer.”The judge agreed with her and certified Navarro, then 16, to stand trial as an adult. With no chance to appeal, he was moved to county jail to await trial.Navarro’s defense attorney, Maggie Jaramillo, convinced him that a trial in the adult court was a good idea. Navarro still remembers his attorney telling him why:“She told me, ‘If we go to trial they are going to look at you as a child with these grown men and they are not going to convict you,’” Navarro says. “She was like, ‘Think about it, are they gonna convict you?’ And I’m like, ‘I don’t know. I don’t know the law. I don’t know nothing about the law.’ And I bought it.” Trying a Kid as an AdultGoing back over Navarro’s case, it’s easy to get the impression that it was somehow fast-tracked.Juvenile court judges in Texas must weigh each of four factors in a certification: whether there’s evidence the child committed the crime; the seriousness of the offense; the sophistication and maturity of the child; and the prospect of the child’s rehabilitation.Navarro’s certification document is eight pages long, but gives no evidence from the five days of argument and testimony at his certification hearing. It affirms that the criteria were met, but offers no detail as to how or why. It contains scant information about the underlying crime itself, aside from an outline of the facts. As required by law, social and psychological evaluations were completed and given to the court, but no details from those documents were included in his certification.Later, when the case went to trial, Matheson says the jury was never told about Navarro’s theory of self-defense against multiple assailants, which could have factored into the verdict.The juvenile judge didn’t change the charges in the case from murder to involuntary manslaughter – which could be a self-defense situation – so when Miguel was transferred to adult court, the jury at his criminal trial wasn’t asked to determine whether he was guilty of manslaughter or even whether he acted in self-defense. They were convened to judge Navarro’s case based on the charges of first-degree murder and aggravated assault. Also, Navarro did not testify on his own behalf so the jury never heard from him during the murder trial. But the court didn’t buy it. Navarro – tried as an adult – was found guilty of murder. Then, the judge sentenced Navarro: 99 years.When he heard the jury hand down the sentence, Navarro says he was in shock.“All I remember is when they told me 99,” Navarro says, “I told my lawyer, ‘This can’t be legal.’ And she said it’s legal. And I was like, ‘It can’t be. … I’d rather be dead.’” Forging AheadTrying Navarro’s case at the state’s highest criminal court means forging through uncharted waters, Matheson says. Navarro’s case could be the first case heard at the Court of Criminal Appeals post-Moon.When the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals vacated Moon’s conviction in December 2014, Moon’s case went back to the juvenile courts. Four months later, he was recertified as an adult and now his case is pending in Harris County court.Only one juvenile certification appeals case has been decided post-Moon, in the lower courts: an armed robbery conviction of a 16-year-old, also in Harris County. The 14th Court of Appeals in Houston vacated that conviction as well, sending that case back to juvenile court. But no cases relating to Moon have reached the state’s highest criminal court yet.For now, it’s a waiting game. The nine-person Court of Criminal Appeals received three volumes of court records for Navarro’s case on September 12. Navarro’s lawyers said his case was recommended for further review, clearing the first major hurdle to make its way in front of the court’s judges. After a case is recommended for review, the court must then decide to hear it. Whether the court actually hears the case is a long shot – in the 2016 fiscal year, the court reviewed only about seven percent of those it was asked to grant further review.Matheson says if the court hears the case and if they win, Navarro won’t walk – at least not that day. But the court’s decision will determine more than just what happens to Navarro.“If the Court of Criminal Appeals finds, as we think it should, that those boilerplate forms are unconstitutional,” Matheson says, “there would be, I suspect, hundreds, if not thousands, of people currently incarcerated, individuals in the Texas Department of Criminal Justice system, that would have an immediate right to challenge or appeal their convictions on the exact same grounds.”Attorneys are starting to see that what happened to Navarro didn’t happen in a vacuum. Duncan says that in the last couple of months, the Harris County Public Defender’s Office has been inundated with letters from people who were arrested as kids and tried as adults, asking if they can have their cases reviewed under the same precedent.“Anything’s Better Than 99 Years”Even if Navarro is recertified and retried, he will be coming at his case as a different person – having grown from a 15-year-old kid with a fourth-grade reading level to a 24-year-old man helping mount his own legal defense.Matheson says one of the most difficult conversations he’s had with Navarro was this summer, after they officially filed their case at the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals. Navarro was convinced he’d be released if the court ruled in his favor. But a likelier scenario, Matheson says, is that his case would go back to the local courts – just as Cameron Moon’s had. In that situation, the best outcome for Navarro may be taking a plea agreement. That could mean another 10 or 20 years in prison at least.“It is what it is,” Matheson says, sighing. “Anything’s better than 99 years.”Navarro admits he’s scared of the Court of Criminal Appeals denying to hear his case, because it’d be another setback and make odds even slimmer that he’d be able to get a lighter sentence. But Navarro’s also scared of a denial because he won’t be able to try his argument in court. If his argument doesn’t work, he at least wants to know why. A denial won’t give him that chance.Navarro keeps several copies of filings from the Moon case in his cell, which he has reread dozens of times.“It gives you hope,” Navarro says. “The days that I get down, I read it and I try to figure out how are they going to tell me no or try to argue that it can’t happen.”Navarro says mounting his own Moon case – and bringing it to lawyers committed to helping him – has also given him a glimmer of hope.“It’s like, you’ve had so much bad, you’re expecting bad,” he says. “It’s pitch black out but there’s a star.” Just before his 19th birthday, Navarro was transferred to the maximum security Connally Unit in Kenedy, Texas, to serve out his 99-year prison sentence. He was young enough, he says, that he didn’t have any facial hair yet. A Way OutNavarro, now 24, is 5’ 3’’ and small-framed. When we speak to him, he’s in handcuffs and ankle restraints. He’s nervous and sweaty. His brown eyes well up with tears when we ask him about that night. To this day, he still doesn’t know why he stabbed and killed Matthew Haltom.Navarro knows he could have left the party, but he saw his brother getting beaten. Out of instinct, he says he went over to fend off his brother’s attackers.“I don’t know, and there’s no logical reason in my mind why I went,” Navarro says. “It’s my bro, it’s all I can say. When I went, he was on the floor and they were kicking him. … That’s just one thing to this day that doesn’t register. You can call it loyalty, you can call it a bond between my brother. I don’t know.”In the early years of his sentence, Navarro says he kept his head down, visiting the law library during the day and reading case books in his cell at night. But prison life still weighs on him.Most of his friends from the outside still haven’t visited and often his family can’t make the three-hour drive from Katy to Kenedy to see him. He says being in prison at such a young age sunk him into depression.“You’re young. You don’t know what life consists of,” Navarro says. “You don’t know what life is gonna bring – especially in these type of environments. And you learn to hate everything.”Despite trying to keep to himself, Navarro’s time in prison hasn’t been without incident. In 2013, he filed a civil lawsuit. He says that on a cold January day, he asked the guards to shut a window. They refused, so he went to the guard’s supervisor. He says the guards weren’t happy and they beat him in retaliation.Cases like this, in which prisoners represent themselves, often don’t get far. They can be dismissed early on because the claim doesn’t have merit or because of procedural technicalities. But Navarro represented himself for more than two years, and a few weeks before his case went to trial, he met his appointed counsel: Clayton Matheson, a San Antonio lawyer.“I had never been in a prison before,” Matheson says. “So dealing with that shock was the first thing I remember.”At the time Matheson was a young, inexperienced attorney, specializing in commercial litigation. But he wanted trial experience, so he volunteered to represent prisoners in civil cases. Matheson’s first case was Navarro’s.“He was serving a 99-year sentence,” Matheson says. “For a lot of people that would take away all sense of hope. Why would you even bother on a little lawsuit to try to vindicate your rights? But he was determined to do that. And it was inspiring.”They ended up losing Navarro’s suit. It’s not uncommon when prisoners attempt to sue guards, but Matheson took the loss hard.“It was devastating,” Matheson says. “We were hopeful to the moment the verdict was read – and I remember looking at him and I felt that I let him down.”After the lawsuit ended, Matheson stayed in contact with Navarro. And Navarro kept researching ways to appeal his original murder conviction. He looked up the criminal statutes concerning juveniles, which are outlined in the Texas Family Code.“I had been researching 55.02, Family Code,” Navarro says. “There’s elements, factors that had to be met in order for them to certify you. It’s a Moon case. Gave me hope.”A Moon case – as in Cameron Moon. He’s another teenager in Texas who was tried as an adult and his conviction was at the heart of a landmark opinion from the state’s highest criminal court, the Texas Court of Criminal Appeals. For Navarro, it offered a way out.Last August, Navarro sent Matheson a letter about Moon:“Would you look over it and tell me why my argument wouldn’t work? … I believe I found the key that should open the door for me to make it out sooner than expected.”Texas SThe letter that Navarro wrote to Matheson about his case. Miguel Navarro had never been to a party with his brother before.It was 2007, a few days after Christmas in Katy, Texas. That night, his girlfriend asked him to hang out with her, but Miguel wanted to hang out with his brother. He was 15-years-old and his older brother Lupe Salazar, 17 at the time, remembers the moment vividly.“I remember, he opened the door and was smiling and was like ‘What’s up dude?’” Salazar says. “I was rushing out the room, and he was like ‘Where are you going?’ Then I told him, ‘I’m going’ and he said ‘Take me with you.’“I told him no, but my girlfriend at the time – she was the one who pumped me up about taking him with me – she said, ‘He’s a cool kid, maybe he’ll have fun.’”Salazar told him to hurry up and Navarro ran back to his room to change. “I was ready to leave,” Salazar says. “I’m waiting in the car, I’m beeping telling him to hurry up and he’s running out the door.”When they arrived, Salazar found that the party was made up of older kids, many of them college-age. They were doing what college kids do: dancing, drinking, drugs. Salazar invited some more friends and when they arrived, things took a turn.“I guess we weren’t wanted at one point. We didn’t even make it to the driveway,” Salazar says. “Beer bottles flew in our direction and I was hearing tons of cuss words: ‘F-ing Mexicans, F-ing this, F-ing that.’ Off in the corner of my eye, I saw people with golf clubs and bats. And that’s when a big brawl ended up happening.”Salazar says he tried to gather up his friends and leave. But it was too late – by then, a group of guys had surrounded him and started beating him.“I felt that I was alone at one point,” he says. “I had six or seven guys on top of me, and then I heard that somebody had gotten stabbed.”The police arrived. Salazar couldn’t find his friends or his brother, but soon he heard the news: three people had been stabbed. One of them was dead. And they knew who had done it – his little brother Miguel.When Navarro went to help his older brother, he says he pulled a out a knife. In the chaos, he stabbed Matthew Haltom.“I did reach for my knife and I did it. I regret it, but I did it,” Navarro says. “He got on top of me and was swinging. I don’t know the man, never met him before. It happened. I stabbed him.”Navarro says other people jumped on top of him and he stabbed two of them also. Navarro spotted some friends of his brother in a car ready to drive off and got into the car with them. He had blood on his shoes.Because it was dark and the street was crowded, few people had a clear perspective on what actually happened. For the most part, eyewitness testimony of the dozens of partygoers at the scene described a similar timeline: a party got out of hand, things got heated, Haltom and two others got stabbed. “When I got to looking for the last years I was able to get data for, the records I was given from Harris County Juvenile probation office did not match the number that was reported to the state,” Duncan says. “We never were really able to figure out what happens or why that happens. … Best estimates, we are talking about hundreds of cases a year across Texas.”Records obtained from the Texas Juvenile Justice Department show that 5,244 juveniles were certified as adults in Texas between 1995 and 2015 – an average of five cases a week for two decades.The year Navarro was certified – 2008 – had the highest number of certifications in Texas in the last 15 years. That year, Navarro was among 277 juveniles who were certified statewide.Not every child who stands trial as an adult is convicted, and each county keeps its own records of those cases. Those numbers aren’t compiled in a single place, but Duncan says Navarro, now serving a long sentence that he may never have received in juvenile court, isn’t alone.“That’s a whole lot of people who are serving time in the Texas Department of Criminal Justice,” Duncan says, “whose cases may, honestly, never should have been certified in the first place.” “It’s a Question of What’s Easiest”What happened to Navarro wasn’t an anomaly – particularly when it comes to juveniles who are tried as adults in Texas.The state changed laws outlining juvenile justice statutes in 1995. Harris County public defender Cheri Duncan says after those revisions, juvenile certifications – the process of a how a court determines if a juvenile should be considered an adult at trial – no longer had an automatic appeal. Kids who were certified had no way to change that decision until after their case was resolved in adult court. So with the stroke of a pen, a kid could be labeled an adult and face the penalties of the adult justice system, with no recourse.These revisions to the juvenile code, Duncan says, prompted juvenile courts to move through certifications quickly. She says it’s a function of two of the attitudes in juvenile courts across Texas back then. “The first is this tough-on-crime attitude that swept the country during the Reagan era, and we wanted to be tough even on kids committing crime. So 14-year-olds can be certified as adults in certain circumstances,” she says. “The other is – I think it’s a question of what’s easiest. What costs less, how do we move those cases. It’s a lot easier to have a form to fill out and move the kid on up the line.”Until very recently, the state made a habit of streamlining juvenile certifications. Some lawyers called the process rubber-stamping: fast-tracking the process of the pivotal decision that determines whether kids should be tried as adults, funneling them from juvenile court into criminal court.In some counties, such as Harris County, the assessment was a one-page, fill-in-the-blank document – no individual consideration needed. From 1997 to 2007, about 93 percent of requested juvenile certifications were granted in Harris County. This statistic, justice reform advocates argue, is an example of an assembly line-style process.Across the state, rubber-stamping could take a more subtle form. Rather than full hearings that allowed both sides to present a case, some juveniles had a single day in front of a judge. A prosecuting attorney may bring only a few witnesses against a defense attorney’s long list of witnesses. Juvenile judges, in some cases, decided to certify a child based merely on the crime, rather than its circumstances.Duncan says, in general, county prosecutors have little incentive to keep children in the juvenile system.“It’s somebody else’s problem if it gets transferred to adult court,” she says. “Prosecutors don’t get rewarded for giving leniency, they just don’t. … So there’s no incentive at all, really, aside from a person’s own internal moral convictions as a prosecutor, to do the right thing.”On a statewide level, cases in which a juvenile is tried as an adult are hard to track. Each time a juvenile case is transferred to the adult courts, the paperwork starts over.last_img read more

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first_img 360 Photos | Ultrasound Imaging | July 11, 2019 360 Degree View of a Smartphone Performing a Cardiac Ultrasound Exam This 360 degree photo shows a basic, point-of-care cardiac echocardiogram being performed using a smartphone turned i read more Technology | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | July 02, 2019 Philips Extends Advanced Automation on Epiq CVx Cardiovascular Ultrasound Platform Philips recently announced new advanced automation capabilities on its Epiq CVx and Epiq CVxi cardiac ultrasound… read more News | Pediatric Imaging | August 14, 2019 Ultrasound Guidance Improves First-attempt Success in IV Access in Children August 14, 2019 – Children’s veins read more read more News | Ultrasound Imaging | November 21, 2016 Fujifilm SonoSite Showcases Comprehensive Portfolio Of Point-Of-Care Ultrasound At RSNA 2016 Technology | Interventional Radiology | August 16, 2019 Profound Medical Receives U.S. FDA 510(k) Clearance for Tulsa-Pro Profound Medical Corp. announced it has received 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to… read more News | Cardiovascular Ultrasound | August 05, 2019 Digital Health Devices Used at Point of Care May Improve Diagnostic Certainty A West Virginia-based rural medical outreach event showcased the use of point-of-care technology in an ambulatory… read more News | Ultrasound Women’s Health | July 11, 2019 FDA Clears Koios DS Breast 2.0 AI-based Software Koios Medical announced its second 510(k) clearance from the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). 3D Auto RV application image courtesy of Philips Healthcarecenter_img The ScanTrainer transvaginal simulator is one example of Intelligent Ultrasound’s simulation technologies. News | Ultrasound Imaging | July 26, 2019 Intelligent Ultrasound Group Collaborating With the National Imaging Academy Wales Artificial intelligence (AI)-based ultrasound software and simulation company Intelligent Ultrasound Group plc (AIM:… read more News | Ultrasound Imaging | July 31, 2019 Studies Confirm Clinical Value of ShearWave Elastography for Liver Fibrosis Evaluation SuperSonic Imagine announced the publication of the results of its prospective multicentric clinical study conducted in… read more Fujifilm SonoSite Inc., specialists in developing cutting-edge ultrasound solutions and providing world-leading education to enable point-of-care visualization access, will present its innovative portfolio of ultrasound solutions and highlight enhanced features and upgrades at the 102nd scientific assembly and annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) held Nov. 27 – Dec. 2, 2016, at McCormick Center in Chicago, Ill. “We designed Fujifilm SonoSite products to meet the needs of a wide range of point-of-care scenarios including some of the most demanding,” said Diku Mandavia, M.D., FACEP, FRCPC, chief medical officer and senior vice president, Fujifilm SonoSite Inc. and FujiFilm Medical Systems U.S.A., Inc. “Clinicians know they can trust Fujifilm technology when it comes to practical day-to-day use but also as tools that help them make rapid lifesaving decisions wherever they are — in the ED, OR or out in the field.”The following will be on exhibit and available for demonstration at RSNA Booth #6713:SonoSite SII—Originally developed for regional anesthesia, vascular access and trauma applications, the SII empowers efficiency for clinicians through a simple, yet smart user interface that adapts to the user’s imaging needs. The system is portable and can be used across multiple hospital environments, including a zero footprint option. The latest version of SII offers improved imaging technology and steep needle profiling. The SII also features DirectClear technology, a novel, patent-pending process that is now available on the rP19c and rC60xi transducers. DirectClear elevates transducer performance by increasing penetration and contrast resolution. Other new enhancements include a larger display with anti-reflection glass, greater storage capacity, updated system ports, an improved stand and armored cabling for durability.SonoSite X-Porte—This highly portable system incorporates Extreme Definition Imaging (XDI), a breakthrough, proprietary beam-forming technology that pinpoints precision so artifact clutter is dramatically reduced and contrast resolution is greatly enhanced. The system includes a user-friendly customizable touchscreen interface as well as real-time educational visual guides and tutorials. New features and functionality include additional customized worksheets as well as the ability to take measurements and calculations on a closed exam.SonoSite iViz—Advancing Fujifilm’s integration of ultrasound with medical IT, iViz was designed with ultra-mobility in mind. It allows seamless access to learning resources and patient information, as well as the ability to store exam findings, submit reports, and consult with remote providers for near real-time assessment, making it especially suited for field use and telemedicine. As a next generation architecture and platform, iViz is the first medical visualization solution that is enabled for bi-directional EMR connectivity through the Synapse VNA. Using this option, iViz accepts patient demographics from the EMR, eliminating manual entry and saving valuable time. With just a few taps, iViz can also send patient reports to the EMR.Vevo MD—A groundbreaking technology, Vevo MD is the world’s first Ultra High Frequency ultrasound system for clinical use. The range of frequencies available (up to 70 MHz) results in unprecedented image resolution—down to 30 micrometers, which is less than half a grain of sand. With Vevo MD, clinicians can see the smallest parts of anatomy, making it an ideal tool for imaging infants, identifying detecting tiny suspicious lesions, or monitoring subtle changes in blood flow in major arteries.See Vevo MD in Action, Learn the Latest About UltrasoundFor the first time ever, Fujifilm will be performing live model scanning with Vevo MD in Booth #6713. This is a rare and exciting opportunity for RSNA attendees to see the world’s first ultra high-frequency ultrasound system for clinical use in action—on real people. Due to RSNA restrictions, onsite imaging scans will be limited to the head, neck, upper abdomen, and extremities.In addition, attendees are encouraged to visit Fujifilm’s In-Booth Healthcare Theater which will include two daily presentations on ultrasound topics: Ultra-High Frequency: A New Mode in Imaging and Ultra-Mobility in Imaging.Register for a product demonstration at RSNA 2016 here: http://rsna.fujimed.comFor more information: www.sonosite.com. FacebookTwitterLinkedInPrint分享 360 Photos | Ultrasound Imaging | July 08, 2019 360 Degree View of an Echocardiography Exam on the SC2000 System This is a 360 degree view of a live cardiac echo demonstration for the Siemens Healthineers Acuson SC2000… read more Related Content 360 Photos | Ultrasound Imaging | July 09, 2019 360 Degree View of a Mitral Valve Ultrasound Exam on a Vivid E95 System A view of a mitral valve on a GE Healthcare Vivid E95 … read more last_img read more

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first_imgMarilyn Dean in The Break-Up (2006)Marilyn Dean is the quintessential difficult gallerist in The Break-Up. Courtesy of Universal Pictures.While this rom-com centers on the antics of Gary Grobowski (Vince Vaughn) and Brooke Meyers (Jennifer Aniston), a couple who continue to live as roommates after they break up, for some of us, it’s really about Brooke’s job as a gallery manager. At the pretend Chicago gallery, Aniston’s character bends over backwards to please the whims of the blunt-bob-wearing gallery owner, Marilyn Dean (Judy Davis), an artist herself, who hurls off insults and demands in the same breath. Among a list of art dealers who are murderers and arsonists, Dean may not seem quite a villain, but with her abusive/perfectionist behavior, she is certainly the most insidiously malevolent.What’s the art like?: Chock-a-block with bland black-and-white abstractions.Most memorable line: “Honey, this isn’t serialism or Cubism. It’s paint by numbers.”Follow artnet News on Facebook: Victor Maitland in Beverly Hills Cop (1984) Eddie Murphy goes undercover gallery-hopping in Beverly Hills Cop (1984). Courtesy of Paramount Pictures.Eddie Murphy stars as Axel Foley, a rough-around-the-edges Detroit cop who heads to Beverly Hills on a mission to solve the murder of his rag-tag friend Mikey Tandino (James Russo), bringing him right into the eye of a conspiratorial art-world storm. The movie opens with Tandino, a security guard at a Beverly Hills gallery, unexpectedly appearing at Foley’s apartment with some suspicious German bank bonds in hand. After a night out carousing and catching up, the pair return to the apartment where they’re jumped: Foley knocked out and Tandino murdered.Taking a “vacation,” Foley travels to the West Coast where he forms an unlikely three musketeers with two Beverly Hills detectives. During his investigations, he uncovers the suspicious dealings of gallery owner Victor Maitland—that’s right, another evil art dealer named Victor. Maitland, it turns out, is a dealer of more than artworks. A shootout ensues at the factory where Maitland runs his drug ring (a must in any cop movie) and after many a tussle, Maitland is fatally wounded.What’s the art like?: A gallery full of creepy mannequins seated at a dinner table.Most memorable line: “You work here with Serge, in an art gallery. You’re not a cop.” If you’ve ever watched a movie set in the the art world, you know what to expect: collectors traipsing about in cocktail attire and furs; artists being tortured by their genius; everyone speaking in vague but definitely pretentious accents; blunt bobs and oversize glasses in every direction; and art dealers—the ringleaders of this whole monied hoopla—as the inevitable villains.The roles might not be such a stretch, what with the Mary Boones of the world, but do the movie studios ever get it right? You be the judge. Below are seven movies featuring villainous gallerists, dealers, and auction house specialists.AdChoicesADVERTISINGinRead invented by Teads Art Spindle in Boogie-Woogie (2009) Art Spindle (center) is a paranoid art dealer willing—at any cost—to win in this nasty but vapid film about the art world. Courtesy of Vertigo Films.This late-aughts satire is a snide wink at the supposed heartless depravity of the London contemporary art scene. In the star-studded film, artists (Amanda Seyfried), dealers, collectors (Gillian Anderson), and curators (Alan Cumming) compete with each other for success in a amoral, gossip-fueled art world hellscape that gets tired pretty fast. The cut-throat art dealer Art Spindle (Danny Huston) (and yes, the name is ridiculous) vies mercilessly with other art-world cognoscenti to try to sweet talk an aged collector (Christopher Lee) into selling his prized Mondrian painting, Boogie Woogie, which Spindle believes is valued at upwards of $20 million.What’s the art like?: Boogie-Woogie is presumably meant to be Broadway Boogie-Woogie, Piet Mondrian‘s 1943 homage to New York City.Most memorable line: “Dad, this is art!” Virgil Oldman in The Best Offer (2013) Geoffrey Rush as Virgil Oldman. Courtesy of Warner Bros.Why limit the treachery to art dealers when auction houses specialists can be just as duplicitous? Enter Virgil Oldman (Geoffrey Rush), the highly regarded, but somewhat solitary director of an auction house who figures as both perpetrator and victim in this elaborate English-language Italian drama. In the movie, Oldman is hired by a reclusive young heiress, Claire Ibbetson (Sylvia Hoeks), to appraise and sell her inheritance of art and antiques. But like a good rich eccentric, she refuses to meet face-to-face, instead speaking to Oldman through a wall. Over time, Oldman finds himself enamored by the mysterious woman, confiding his feelings to an artificer, Robert (Jim Sturgess), with whom he works. Which is all very nice, except Oldman is leading a double art-world life. When he’s not murmuring through estate walls, he is busy selling forgeries and mis-attributed work with the help of his friend and artist, Billy Whistler (Donald Sutherland). Romance, deception, conspiracy, and even mechanical robots follow as it turns out that Ibbetson may be the mastermind of a much bigger art-world scheme—one that the compromised Oldman finds himself unable to escape.  What’s the art like?: A collection of portraits of women, seemingly spanning the past few centuries, is the prize of the reclusive heiress.Most memorable line: “Human emotions are like works of art. They can be forged. They seem just like the original, but they’re a forgery.” Victor Taft in Legal Eagles (1986) Darryl Hannah is a heavy-handed performance artist in Legal Eagles (1986). Courtesy of Universal Pictures.Normal people, beware the art world! That’s the resounding takeaway of this 1986 romantic thriller starring Daryl Hannah and Robert Redford. Brimming with art-world stereotypes, the plot centers on Chelsea Deardon (Hannah), a dysfunctional performance artist traumatized by the suspicious death of her father, the celebrated artist Sebastian Deardon— in a fire which she (a child at the time) was saved from. Now grown, Deardon is arrested during an ill-fated attempt to recover a painting her father had dedicated to her, and winds up in the counsel of lawyers Laura Kelly (Debra Winger) and Tom Logan (Redford). Oh, and about that fire: it destroyed all of Sebastain’s other works… supposedly. Want to venture a guess as to the mastermind behind the blaze? That’s right, an insurance-hungry art dealer by the name of Victor Taft (Terrance Stamp), who—in addition to being a murderous arsonist—is also the proprietor of 57th street gallery. Just one problem: he didn’t really destroy the work, although he did kill the artist (perhaps to corner the market?). A convoluted set of altercations play out, including an attempted bombing, fake identities, love triangles, fire-themed performance art, and Chelsea’s prized painting winding up hidden in a sculpture.  What’s the art like?: The elder Deardon’s work is never shown, but given the number of faux Jean Dubuffets and Picassos in the movie, we’d guess it’s something in between. The younger Deardon’s work is like terrible Chris Burden, but with flames. Most memorable line: Laura Kelly: “She’s a performance artist. Happenings, very ephemeral experience.” Tom Logan: “She’s a what?” Juno Skinner in True Lies (1994) As an antiquities-dealer-turned-terrorist-accomplice, Juno Skinner has perfected the art of pouring champagne while multi-tasking.  Courtesy of 20th Century Fox.Of course, any ‘90s action thriller starring Arnold Schwarzenegger has got to include some variety of covert international intrigue… but a dealer of ancient art in cahoots with a terrorist cell? Sure, why not! While the comedic forays between undercover spy Harry Tasker (Schwarzenegger) and his unwitting but adventure-seeking wife (Jamie Lee Curtis) are the heart of this thoroughly entertaining flick, the art lovers among us will appreciate that central to the plot is Juno Skinner (Tia Carrere), a bad-seed antiquities dealer who collaborates with Crimson Jihad, the terrorist organization Tasker is charged with dismantling. In one scene, Schwarzenegger poses as a corporate art advisor, which is totally not suspicious at all. What’s the art like?: Objects of the ancient world: lamassu, stele, and the like.Most memorable line: “Those wimps [archaeologists]. It’s because I use my diplomatic contacts to export cultural treasures from countries which tell them to take a hike.” Rhodora Haze in Velvet Buzzsaw (2019) Rene Russo and Jake Gyllenhaal in Velvet Buzzsaw. Courtesy of Netflix.In this supernatural thriller, Jake Gyllenhaal plays Morf Vandewalt, a $5-a-word art critic who can make or break careers with a single review (Gyllenhaal modeled the character after none other than Jerry Saltz). An ambitious gallery underling, Josephina (Zawe Ashton), discovers the artwork of her reclusive neighbor in the trash and brings it to Vandewalt, who is captivated by the expressive and even grotesque scenes of anguish.The mentally ill (and possibly murderous) artist’s dying wish that the work be destroyed doesn’t deter the savvy but savage gallerist, Rhodora Haze (Rene Russo), nor the bluntly bobbed art advisor, Gretchen (Toni Collette), who are both all-too-eager to line their pockets with profits—until, that is, horror-flick appropriate vengeance is meted out upon each and every one of them.What’s the art like?: Nightmarish in a Henry Darger-meets-Chaime Soutine kind of way.Most memorable line: “Critique is so limiting and emotionally draining.” Want to stay ahead of the art world? Subscribe to our newsletter to get the breaking news, eye-opening interviews, and incisive critical takes that drive the conversation forward.last_img read more

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first_imgBvlgari Hotel Shanghai to open with exclusive Virtuoso benefitsBvlgari Hotel Shanghai to open with exclusive Virtuoso benefitsVirtuoso®, the leading luxury and experiential travel network, is extending exclusive perks to upscale travellers who stay at the new Bvlgari Hotel Shanghai. Debuting June 20, the Bvlgari Shanghai is poised to become a new hotspot in one of Asia’s capitals of art and style. As an opening offer just for clients of Virtuoso advisors, travellers will receive a guaranteed upgrade to the next category of room at the time of booking, valid until December 31, 2018.In addition, only guests who book their stay with a Virtuoso travel advisor will receive the following complimentary benefits:Breakfast for two daily (including room service), available 24 hours a dayHotel credit valued at $100 USDEarly check-in/late check-out (subject to availability)Wi-Fi“Guests seeking a VIP experience in Shanghai, where Italian styling is only elevated by Asian hospitality, should look no further than Bvlgari Hotel Shanghai,” said Albert Herrera, Virtuoso’s senior vice president of Global Product Partnerships. “Each of those cultures is a master in their discipline, and when you combine them, it is truly something special. Views that soar over the Bund will remind guests of Shanghai’s heritage, juxtaposed against Bvlgari’s modern and chic setting.”Bvlgari Hotel Shanghai, the sixth jewel of Bvlgari’s hospitality collection, is authentically Italian, including the design, hand-crafted furniture, fabrics and detailing. The hotel is situated in a tranquil riverside location amid private parks and gardens in the heart of the city, only minutes from attractions including the iconic Bund, the museums of People’s Square and shopping. For additional convenience, the hotel provides complimentary Maserati limousines within the city center so that guests can visit all of these attractions in comfort and style.The contemporary 48-story tower offers perhaps the city’s best views of the Bund and the skyscrapers of Pudong. True to its location, the hotel combines modernity with heritage, as its Chinese fine-dining restaurant and opulent ballroom will be housed in the restored Chamber of Commerce Shanghai, one of the city’s most historic buildings.The 63 rooms and 19 suites offer some of Shanghai’s most spacious accommodations. The chic guestrooms boast stunning views from the top eight floors of the tower, and include walk-in closets, double washbasins, marble bathtubs, separate rain showers and heated toilets. Rooms average 650 square feet, while suites range from 870 square feet to the 6,000-square-foot Bulgari Suite.Guests at Bvlgari Hotel Shanghai will enjoy a host of complimentary benefits including in-room check-in; Wi-Fi hotspot for roaming throughout the city; carbon-fiber MOMO bike usage; BVLGARI toiletries; turndown perfume; turndown tea infusion service; clothes pressing; and Berluti shoe polishing. The hotel offers tours of Shanghai’s art and heritage, which include visits to collections of Tang and Ming Dynasty treasures and the studios of some of the city’s top artists.The six food and beverage outlets include Il Ristorante – Niko Romito and Bao Li Xuan, a Chinese haute-cuisine restaurant. Il Ristorante – Niko Romito is curated by Niko Romito, one of the world’s most celebrated chefs with three Michelin stars for his Reale restaurant in Abruzzo, and presents a carefully curated canon of contemporary Italian cooking.A 21,500-square-foot spa and fitness center contains eight treatment rooms including soothing vitality pools; salt saunas; aroma steam rooms; rainforest showers; foot massage room; half-Olympic-sized indoor pool; yoga and Pilates studio; and 24-hour gym.Bvlgari Hotel Shanghai is the latest luxury property to debut with assistance from the prestigious Virtuoso Preview program. Preview offers benefits not obtainable anywhere else to clients of Virtuoso travel advisors. Preview is part of Virtuoso’s eminent Hotels & Resorts Program, which includes more than 1,200 of the world’s finest properties in 100 countries.To book your visit to the Bvlgari Hotel Shanghai online or through a Virtuoso travel advisor and receive exclusive benefits, visit www.virtuoso.com.Source = Virtuosolast_img read more

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first_imgWebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite WebsiteWebsiteWebsite Emnambithi/Ladysmith Municipal Manager Mr MP Khathide also spoke at the event and gave an overview of what the municipality is planning on doing during the 2014/2015 financial year.Inkosi Shabalala of Matiwane presented the mayor with a gift in the form of a sheep to show appreciation for hosting the event and bringing together the community of Ladysmith in Matiwane.The event also saw a large line-up of performers entertaining the crowd.The performers included Linda Sibiya, Tizozo, Abanqobi and comedian Siyabonga Mpungose.The State of the Municipal Address is an annual event that follows the State of the Nation and State of the Province Address. Mayor Vincent Madlala delivered the State of the Municipal Address in Matiwane (Ward 23) on Saturday.The event took place at the Matiwane sports grounds amid a crowd of thousands of people from all over Ladysmith.In his speech, Mayor Madlala outlined the municipality’s budget, as well as all the intended projects for the year 2014/2015. He also told of the way in which the municipality is expected to spend the budget when it comes to service delivery.last_img read more

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first_imgDefense up… pic.twitter.com/EctyIjckJ7— Burton Burns (@UACoachBBurns) June 15, 2015Every player wants to play in the NFL, and most of them think they will. Those good enough to garner Alabama’s attention certainly think they’re destined for the NFL, probably for a decade at least.So, why wouldn’t Saban pitch the NFL to recruits when he’s fielded an entire 11-man lineup on offense and defense exclusively with future NFL players? Why is the one water bottle salesman in the desert no longer selling water to thirsty people?“I’ve actually changed how I talk to recruits now,” Saban said Saturday. “The reason that you’re going to college is to prepare yourself for the day you can’t play football. I think we have a lot of people way back in high school that look at college as a conduit to get to the NFL.”Saban cited a statistic that said 380 or so players declare for the NFL draft in the past five years; 103 declared this year, down slightly from the 106 in 2018. One in four will not get drafted, and another 25 percent failed to last three years in the NFL.He brought up the example of Ronnie Harrison — Saban didn’t single him out by name, but it wasn’t hard to figure out who he was talking about — a 2017 All-SEC safety who forgo his senior season to enter the 2018 NFL Draft. Harrison was selected 93rd overall by the Jacksonville Jaguars; he signed a 4-year contract worth a sum of $3.4 million with an $800,000 signing bonus. However, Saban said Harrison would have had a shot at becoming the first safety selected in the 2019 Draft had he returned to school. The first safety selected in 2018 was Harrison’s own Alabama teammate, Minkah Fitzpatrick; he signed a 4-year deal worth $16.5 million with a $10 million signing bonus.“People have to be smart about the business decisions they make relative to the NFL because it is all business,” Saban said. “When people make emotional decisions, they’re going to have to suffer some really difficult consequences for themselves in the future because you don’t have to go out for the draft early. You can come back and play.”<span data-mce-type=”bookmark” style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>To boil it down to one sentence, Saban no longer pitches the NFL because his players are so talented that they’re often so tempted by the 50 cents they can earn right now they don’t have the foresight to wait for the dollar bill waiting for them around the corner.Suffice to say, that’s a different approach than, say, Tim Lester makes at Western Michigan. But either way the point is the same: Nick Saban no longer pitches the NFL to recruits.And if Nick Saban doesn’t use future NFL paychecks to woo recruits, it’s marks a fundamental change in the way all of us should view college football, even at the highest level of the sport. College football is not a means to an end or a conduit to the NFL, to borrow Saban’s term. It is an end unto itself, an opportunity for players to obtain an education that will set them up for life after they’ve stopped playing football, which, for the overwhelming majority of players, will happen well before their 30th birthday.To be fair, the majority of college football coaches are already using the “It’s a 40-year decision, not a 4-year decision” pitch to recruits. But now the one coach who could get away with not using the 40-not-4 pitch is using the 40-not-4 pitch.A college scholarship is, at its core, not a ticket to NFL wealth, but instead a tool to acquire an education that you will need to support yourself for the rest of your life after you can no longer play football. Yes, even at Alabama. No one puts more players in the NFL than Nick Saban. At the opening day of the 2018 season, 44 Crimson Tide players dotted NFL rosters, the most in the nation. According to a 7-round mock draft posted by The Athletic on Monday, 11 more will join those 44 later this month.So, if anyone could use the NFL as a recruiting pitch, it’s Saban. This is why the next sentence is important, so important that it gets its own paragraph break:Nick Saban is no longer using the NFL to pitch recruits.Again, the coach who made these two graphics possible is no longer using the NFL to pitch to recruits. Together Everyone Accomplishes More pic.twitter.com/oVaBU4dvo4— Burton Burns (@UACoachBBurns) June 12, 2015center_img AD Quality Auto 360p 720p 1080p Sponsored By Connatixlast_img read more

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