March 3, 2021
  • 7:39 am Watch Members of Lettuce Join Vulfpeck For Late Night Jazz Fest Throwdown
  • 7:39 am The Disco Biscuits Share Full Videos Of Powerful Hometown Run At The Fillmore
  • 7:36 am The Claypool Lennon Delirium Transcends Universes At The Capitol Theatre
  • 7:35 am Phish Shows Off ‘California Love’ In Their Tour Closing Performance [Recap]
  • 7:31 am Hometeam New Years Rally To Enter 2017 With Music, Art, & Community In Florida

first_imgFulfilling the dreams of many, Vulfpeck delivered a star-spangled performance at the legendary Tipitina’s in New Orleans, LA last night. The quartet brought their thrilling funkitude in the fair trade of pure satisfaction, providing over an hour of hits, classics, and very special collaborations.Trading instruments throughout the night, the band welcomed some of the room’s most incredible talents to the stage for the quintessential sit-ins that Jazz Fest late nights are meant for. Singer Madelyn Grant joined in for a “Back Pocket” audience sing-a-long, triumphantly lifting the spirits of the Vulfpack tribe. Adam Deitch jumped behind the drum kit for a gut-wrenching “It Gets Funkier,” before another crowd favorite “Christmas In L.A.” brought chills to the Louisiana heat. A very appropriate “Outro” closed their set, with Lettuce’s Adam “Shmeeans” Smirnoff, and The Shady Horns’ Eric “Benny” Bloom and Ryan Zoidis providing the funkiest of notes. By the end of their set, the conscious club was a full display case of talent, dance moves, and multi-instrumentalism.As appropriately scheduled, they made for the perfect segue into a killer night of lechuga. “Back Pocket” with Madelyn Grant“It Gets Funkier” with Adam Deitch“Outro” with Adam Smirnoff and The Shady HornsSetlist: Vulfpeck at Tipitina’s, New Orleans, LA – 4/24/16:Conscious Club, Fugue, Rango, Wong, Cripple Creek, My Favorite Cock, Back Pocket, Funky Duck, 1612, It Gets Funkier, Beastly, Christmas In L.A., Outrolast_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgLoad remaining images After a full month on the road, Phish played the final performance of their main tour at the Sleep Train Amphitheatre in Chula Vista, CA. Summer 2016 has been marked by a lot of highs and lows for Phish fans, with a handful of break out shows that stand apart from the rest. Nevertheless, there’s always something to enjoy from any Phish performance, and the tour closer certainly had a lot of true highlight moments.While an opening “Farmhouse” is always going to elicit groans, the first set picked up steam with “555” and “Water In The Sky.” It was the “Ghost,” however, where the band really got into a synchronous groove that would transcend through the remainder of the set. The jam moved into tight melodic space, with Trey Anastasio taking the lead and Page McConnell accentuating on the piano. The music ultimately slowed in pace until it naturally concluded, letting the band play the new short original, “Ass Handed.” The Jon Fishman led tune is punchy, with the drummer sing “you can get your ass handed to you, every day” before a dramatic musical finale.Watch “Farmhouse,” streaming below.The set kept raging with the Gamehendgeian classic “The Sloth,” nailing the groovy rocker before bringing out Chilling, Thrilling instrumental “Martian Monster.” McConnell worked some eerie sound effects into the jam, with lots of reverb getting the music into darker, spacier places before bursting into the beloved “Reba.” The song was well executed, leading through the composed sections into a great open jam. At the jam’s conclusion, Fishman took the momentary pause to say that he wanted to restate his point from earlier, and the band launched into a second “Ass Handed” of the set. It was an unexpected departure that really showed just how much fun this band is having on stage.As if this set needed more funk, Phish broke out into a noteworthy version of “Tube.” The band was all patience, building up a great jam and stretching the number towards the 10-minute mark. It was easily one of the best “Tube” jams of the 3.0 era. The set kept rocking with “Wolfman’s Brother,” which featured unexpected elements of the 2pac song “California Love” from Trey. Fans will certainly recall the epic “Tweezer” on July 15th, 1998 with its famed “California Love Jam.” This was certainly in the same vein, as Anastasio changed lyrics to reference Chula Vista and playfully displayed his love for the Golden State.Watch the “Tube” and “California Love”-jam version of “Wolfman’s Brother,” streaming below.Finally, it was “Walls of the Cave” that brought this set to a perfect finale, even working in a “Streets of Cairo” tease from Trey. What a set!The second half got off to a great start, as Phish opened with a jammed out “2001” that again included elements of “California Love.” The song’s grand finale brought the energy up, and “46 Days” delivered some walloping rock and roll. The jam was tight throughout, never really heading outside the box, but the following “Piper” took off in the second set. The song moved from the verses into a spacey floating jam, before going full on rager. Eventually, they pulled the jam into “Twist,” keeping the jams flowing in a free-for-all second set. Anastasio’s light touch guitarwork guided the song, bringing his tone from a dreamy treble to a looming low end, and ultimately back into the song’s ending.Watch “2001,” streaming below.After “Twist,” the band broke into the Joy tune “Backwards Down The Number Line.” It was a nice version, but the crowd truly erupted for the following song, “Carini.” The song itself featured some joking on the “Ass Handed” lyrics from Fishman and a nice Chilling, Thrilling scream sound effect add-on, but the jam was one of the show’s best. They got into deep and dark territory, really keeping the energy alive before hitting the drum intro of “Harry Hood.” The song’s improvisational section was nice and light, bringing some transcendental Phish into the room. As the feel good ending of “Hood” dwindled, the band saved room for one more song in the set, Rolling Stones’ “Loving Cup.” They nailed it.With a short pause, Phish returned for the final song of their 2016 summer tour. Trey first thanked the audience, before saying the band couldn’t end without playing Page McConnell’s favorite song: “Sleeping Monkey.” The song was played standardly, but Anastasio threw in a tidbit about Googling “sleeping monkey revived at train station in India” to learn more about the song’s origins. (Could this be it?) Naturally, the guitarist had one more surprise in store, and busted into the riff of “Tweezer Reprise.” Anastasio and Fishman again sang the lyrics of “Ass Handed” instead of the usual lyrics, putting a fun twist on the classic Phish tune to leave fans smiling.Though the band will be back at LOCKN’ Festival and Dick’s Sporting Goods Park later this summer, those isolated runs aren’t quite the same as a full on tour season. Thanks to everyone for following along with us through all of the twenty shows, and, most of all, thank you to Phish for countless hours of musical enjoyment.You can see the full Phish.net setlist from tonight’s show, below. All photos contributed by Brandon Weil for L4LM, and a full gallery can be seen below.Setlist: Phish at Sleep Train Amphitheatre, Chula Vista, CA – 7/23/16Set 1: Farmhouse, 555, Water in the Sky, Ghost, Ass Handed, The Sloth, Martian Monster > Reba, Ass Handed, Tube > Wolfman’s Brother > Walls of the CaveSet 2: Also Sprach Zarathustra > 46 Days > Piper > Twist > Backwards Down the Number Line > Carini, Harry Hood > Loving CupEncore: Sleeping Monkey, Tweezer Reprise.Notes: This show was webcast via Live Phish. Wolfman’s Brother contained California Love teases and quotes. WOTC contained a Streets of Cairo tease. Carini and Tweezer Reprise contained Ass Handed quotes.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgThe Saint Mary’s Science Hall, which was under construction during the 2015-2016 academic year, is ready for use, and construction on the new Angela Athletic and Wellness Complex will begin later this fall.The Science Hall is almost complete despite slipping a few weeks past the intended July completion date, professor of biology Thomas Fogle said.“We are right at the very end, and we’ve been talking to construction people and they are beginning to move out,” Fogle said. “They’re just finishing the last little details, and we are going to be moving equipment in over the next few weeks as space becomes available.”Austin Stahly, manager of energy and facilities projects, said the construction hold-up was in part due to a nearby tunnel being unable to support the originally planned construction load. Now that is settled, concrete trucks will pull in and complete the sidewalk, stairs and handicap entrance very soon, he said.Fogle said the physics lab and lecture rooms, on the basement level, have been completed and in use since last December. The biology and chemistry rooms will be ready for use soon, as well.“I would expect over the next few months we’ll be fully integrated into there, using these spaces certainly within the next few weeks,” Fogle said.Ben Bowman, director of facilities, said the actual building is ready for occupancy, though small details still need to be completed.“We pulled all of [the construction workers] from the exterior to concentrate on finishing the interior, and now that we’re able to occupy the interior, we have people working on the exterior,” Bowman said. “The inside can be fully occupied at this point, and now professors are trying to get their equipment organized and moved into the labs before they start holding classes in there.”Fogle hopes students take full advantage of the new spaces for studying, exchanging data and relaxing. Two of the smaller labs will be used for research requiring very clean conditions, such as microbiology and cell cultures, while the larger lab space is more multi-purposeful.There will be a building dedication Oct. 14 for donors, students and faculty to see the new space, Fogle said.Though construction on Angela Athletic and Wellness Complex is due to begin this fall, the athletic fields have been completed and are currently in use by the soccer team for evening practices and a scrimmage, Bowman said.Bowman said the addition will include a field house with suspended track on the east side, a health services suite on the south side, an athletic suite on north side is the athletic suite, a multi-purpose room on the west side, and cardio and strength will be located centrally.Julie Schroeder-Biek, director of athletics, said in an email that the facility will be very functional for the College’s athletic department by providing needed locker room space, room for intramural and club sports and more.“This will be a building that our entire campus will benefit from,” she said in an email. “Besides athletic, fitness and strength options, there are a lot of planned community spaces built into the building as well. We have spacious lounges and a cafe.  Women’s Health and [the Belles Against Violence Office] will join us in the facility, so that it truly will be an athletic and wellness facility.”Stahly said the usual occupants of Angela are currently spread out in four places with most of the staff located in Dalloway’s Clubhouse, some staff members in McCandless Hall, strength and cardio equipment in the basement of Regina North and training staff still located in Angela.Volleyball and basketball will still use the performance court in Angela for competitions this season, Stahly said.“We’re fortunate to have space on campus to move all the activities, people and equipment,” Bowman said.Construction crews will move in after Labor Day, and the plan is to be done sometime early in 2018, Biek said.A final noticeable campus construction activity is located on the west side of Le Mans Hall, where a tunnel top cracked and began to settle over the summer, Bowman said,“They had to pull that tunnel top off this summer and … pour a partial lid on top of it,” he said. “That tunnel gets a lot of traffic from people trying to get around to the north side of Moreau, with deliveries, lifts for roof repairs, etc. So that and age could have been part of the issue there.”Bowman said other tunnels on property are not to the point of failure, but have been addressed. Recently repaired tunnels include the tunnel on the west side of the library, and big concrete structures have been placed on top of the tunnel between McCandless and Angela to prevent the added weight of parked cars and heavy bus traffic.Tags: angela athletic and wellness complex, Construction, saint mary’s, science halllast_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgBy Kay Valle/Diálogo August 10, 2016 The National Inter-Institutional Security Force (FUSINA), through the Military Police for Public Order (PMOP), launched the “Live Better Drug-Free” program. The drug prevention program was created for children and teenagers during their school years. “The program is the Honduran government’s response to the increasing use of drugs by children and teenagers at both public and private schools,” said Armando Meza, the program’s director. “According to a study by the Honduran Institute for the Prevention of Alcoholism, Drug Addiction and Drug Dependence, three out of every 10 students use some type of drug.” Since the program will not be limited to prevention, the National Directorate of Social Intervention and the Secretary of Education are part of the initiative. Meza said that the National Directorate of Social Intervention considered the petitions of parents and teachers in extending the program. “We created the ‘Student Therapeutic Community’ in May 2016, in response to those who are concerned about young people who want to break an addiction. In this stage of the program, we send young people to rehab if they are dependent on a substance. This is done with the help of a psychologist, parents, and teachers.” The “Live Better Drug-Free” program, funded by the Honduran government, is administered by the National Directorate of Social Intervention, which has provided computers, the “datashow” program, and other types of equipment. The PMOP contributes logistics, instructors, and printed material. Many civilian volunteers have become involved with the program, telling their personal rehabilitation stories so that their experiences can help young people understand the dangers and consequences of drug use. Lieutenant Mario Rivera, PMOP spokesperson, remarked that curiosity, among other factors, is one of the reasons young people start using drugs, and it becomes difficult to then stop using these substances. “Once they get immersed in the addiction, they become easy prey for dealers to use them in the drug trade,” Lt. Rivera said. “Young people who consume addictive substances damage their health first, but they are also exposed to danger when they are employed by drug gangs to commit all kinds of illegal acts,” Lt. Rivera warned. “The young people are forced to belong to gangs, and in some cases they are killed by these very same gangs or by rival groups.” Public and private schools will benefit Currently, “Live Better Drug-Free” is taught in public schools, but there are plans to bring this program to private schools in the future. The first program beneficiaries were students from schools in the city of Tegucigalpa, department of Francisco Morazán, San Pedro Sula, department of Cortés, and La Ceiba, department of Atlántida. But it is expected to be expanded to all 18 of departments in the country. Another goal is to bring the program to children from first grade in elementary school to their last year in high school. “So far, over 47,000 students at 35 public institutions have gone through the training in Tegucigalpa, San Pedro Sula, and La Ceiba, and we hope to have trained over 65,000 young people by the month of November. Thus, we reaffirm our commitment to serving our people,” Lt. Rivera said. The program activities are not confined to workshops; the students are given space to demonstrate their talents in sports and in the arts. “There have been a lot of positive stories as a result of the ‘Live Better Drug-Free’ prevention program. One we can mention is that young people are creating enduring relationships with our instructors,” Lt. Rivera said. “Also, a lot of talented people have emerged in music, dance, and soccer, since we don’t only teach workshops through this program. We also have music, dance, and sport activities.” Lt. Rivera concluded: “The program is being brought to thousands of young people. We know we still have a lot of people to reach, but we are sure that what they are being taught will save some lives and rescue them from the control of criminal groups. It is this conviction that motivates us to keep fighting against addiction every day.”last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York America’s pioneering poet, Walt Whitman, was born in 1819 on his family’s Suffolk County farm in a house built by his father that still stands in West Hills. Of course, the once fertile fields and thick forests that made such an indelible impression on his creativity as he wandered and wondered about have much diminished—but their influence comes through just as strong today as when he first published his seminal work, Leaves of Grass, in 1855.When he was 4, he and his family moved to Brooklyn, but he came back many times over the years: as a teacher, a newspaper publisher and an accomplished wordsmith. The last time Whitman visited his homestead, The Good Grey Poet, as he’d later become known, was 62. Now the quaint two-storied shingled house is run by the Walt Whitman Birthplace Association, a nonprofit group, which arose in 1947 when the site was in the way of the newly planned Route 110. Instead, the highway was moved and Whitman’s homestead was preserved for future generations.These days the association is engaged in the long process of applying for National Historic Landmark Status, which would give it greater recognition. This status has already been granted to Whitman’s home in Camden, N.J., the only place he ever owned, where he spent the last years of his life, dying in squalor crippled and broke in 1892 after publishing O Captain! My Captain! and Drum-Taps, among his iconic poems and collections on the Civil War.Cynthia Shor, the executive director of the Walt Whitman Birthplace Association, is hopeful about their prospects for the West Hills home.“We are making the case—which we certainly believe—that the environment really imprinted him, and really created the young spirit and soul that was Whitman,” she tells the Press. “He revered nature. He wrote three poems that specifically talked about his birth and early childhood. One of them was ‘When a Child Went Forth.’ It’s a list poem: He becomes the birds, he becomes the land, and he becomes the daffodils, so to speak. We infer that he’s telling us that the home of his birth imprinted him mentally, spiritually and characteristically.”That influence is clear to Karen Karbiener, a Whitman scholar at New York University who is working on a book titled Walt Whitman and New York, and is an honorary board member of the birthplace association.“Long Island was Whitman’s America in his youth and, to a great extent, through the creation of the first three editions of Leaves of Grass,” she says. “He knew this region like no other.”It was here, she observes, that he founded Huntington’s newspaper, The Long-Islander, which was bought last month by Huntington businessman James Kelly. He also became interested in politics as an electioneer for Martin Van Buren’s campaign and published his first poem, “Young Grimes,” in the Long Island Democrat  on Jan. 1, 1840. From Whitman’s autobiographical work, Specimen Days, he wrote that “the successive growth stages of my infancy, childhood, youth and manhood were all pass’d on Long Island, which I sometimes feel as if I had incorporated.”According to Pulitzer Prize-winning biographer Justin Kaplan, no bylined articles have been found from Whitman’s tenure at his own paper, which he sold after a year because, as he put it, “only my own restlessness prevented me gradually establishing a permanent property there.” But two articles he wrote for the Democrat, which was based in Jamaica, Queens, do survive. One was about “an unfortunate and somewhat singular accident” in July 1838 when a Northport farmer carrying a pitchfork on his way home from his fields was struck by lightning that “killed him on the instant.”Today, Whitman is remembered not for his journalism or his time in the classroom, which he by his own words detested. As was common back then, a teacher in LI’s rural communities would board with the parents of his students and handle a schoolhouse of up to 80 kids ranging in age from 5 to 15 for nine hours a day.In a letter written in 1840 to his friend Abraham Leech, Whitman denounced Woodbury, one of the places he taught, as a “Devil’s den” and “Purgatory Fields,” adding that “when the Lord created the world, he used up all the good stuff, and was forced to form Woodbury and its denizens out of the fag ends, the scrapts and refuse… [I]gnorance, vulgarity, rudeness, conceit, and dullness are the reigning gods of this deuced sink of despair…[h]ere in this nest of bears, this forsaken of all God’s creation; among clowns and country bumpkins, flat-heads, and coarse brown-faced girls, dirty, ill-favoured young brats, with squalling throats and crude manners…”Those words would hardly describe the generation of kids who’ve taken class trips to the birthplace since its opening. Curators have done their best to recreate what his home looked like in the 19th century when he lived there and convey his importance to American culture. But it was never an easy task in the group’s beginning, given the birthplace’s close confines.“School children would come into the house and they would sit on the floor and I would teach them poetry,” recalls Shor. “That was always a delight. And when it was over, I’d hop behind the counter and sell them candy bars to make money for the birthplace.”HALLOWED GROUNDS: The Walt Whitman Birthplace and Interpretive Center in Huntington offers visitors the chance to witness the beloved poet up-close and personal, through historical pieces, photographs, statues and even a recording of Whitman reciting several lines of a poem. It also hosts lectures and poetry workshops. (Christopher Twarowski/Long Island Press)A visitors’ center was built in 1997 to accommodate class trips, lectures, poetry workshops and showcase Whitman memorabilia, such as a recording the poet made for Thomas Edison, as well as provide offices for the association’s staff. The house itself underwent a much-needed restoration in 2001. In recent years, a larger-than-life-sized bronze statue of the poet holding a butterfly was donated to the site and now stands within its courtyard. People from across the country and the globe visit the humble bedroom at the back of Whitman’s brown-shingled home where the famous poet entered into this world.The Walt Whitman Mall, owned by Simon Properties, is less than a football field away from the birthplace. Perhaps the only mall in America named after a poet, the façade facing the parking lot once had excerpts from Leaves of Grass emblazoned on its walls. Built in 1962, the mall has undergone many revisions and expansions, as well as a name change to Walt Whitman Shops in Huntington Station, and it’s currently undergoing yet another renovation. Shor says the lines of poetry may not be on the outside walls when the work is done, but “he will be a presence at the mall and it’s going to be very special in the new revision.”Shor believes Whitman would approve “because he was a self-promoter… One of his great lines is: ‘I celebrate myself, and sing myself, and you shall do likewise.’”“If Walt Whitman were alive today, he would get a kick out of the Walt Whitman Mall,” insists Thomas Fink, a Port Jefferson resident who is a professor of English at City University of New York-LaGuardia College and whose eighth collection of poetry, Joyride, will be published in October. “He wrote catalog poetry, ‘Song of Myself’ being perhaps the major example, and the mall is one big catalog of diverse stores that themselves are catalogs of diverse elements. And he would love the boisterous, brazen advertising because Whitman was very intent on self-promotion as a poet.”For example, Fink cites how Whitman handled a letter that Ralph Waldo Emerson, then the country’s most illustrious writer, had written him, praising his Leaves of Grass as “the most extraordinary piece of wit and wisdom that America has yet contributed.”“When he took Emerson’s praise in a private correspondence and made it an egregious blurb, the Transcendentalist chieftain was taken aback,” Fink says.As Kaplan points out, Whitman’s face “appeared on cigar boxes although he never smoked.”Whitman himself said, “I’ve been photographed, photographed and photographed until the cameras themselves are tired of me.” One of the most famous images was taken by the acclaimed Matthew Brady.But it’s his free-verse poetry eschewing the constraints of set rhythm and rhyme that, Kaplan and other scholars say, established him forever as “the bold voice of joy and sexual liberation, the chronicler of the century of democracy, science, progress and steam.”And his influence still inspires.“Poets writing in English owe a great debt to Walt Whitman,” says Sandy McIntosh, author of eight poetry collections and a former literature and creative writing professor at Hofstra University and Long Island University as well as the publisher of Marsh Hawk Press, based in East Rockaway. “He wrote and encouraged others to write in plain, straightforward English, the typically American form of speech. Rather than poetry being found in complex rhyme and rhythm schemes of classical English poetry, Whitman showed that from our commonplace speech real poetry would spring.”The Walt Whitman Birthplace State Historic Site and Interpretive Center is located at 246 Old Walt Whitman Road in Huntington Station. Learn about its many treasures and how you can help safeguard Whitman’s legacy for future generations by calling 631-427-5240 or visiting www.WaltWhitman.org.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_img 4SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr There are two kinds of lottery winners: Those who grow their wealth, invest in the future, and help people and organizations dear to them, leaving enough to pass on to their heirs—and the kind of people who blow it and lose it all within a few years. Hopefully, last night’s three Powerball winners will use their money wisely.Whether you play weekly, join the office pool, or swear off gambling entirely, everyone can learn a little something from those hapless souls whose lives took a turn for the worse when their lottery dreams came true.1. Carefully vet your financial advisors: Abraham Shakespeare pocketed $17 million of a $30 million jackpot in 2006. He befriended a woman, DeeDee Moore, who said she’d help “protect” his money from friends and family who were asking for handouts. She’d convinced him to transfer his money to her account, and then killed him. She was sentenced to life in prison without parole. continue reading »last_img read more

READ MORE

first_img 13SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr Protecting your organization is expensive. Leaders are encouraged and sometimes even compelled to provide additional resources to counter threats. As the cost of data breaches rise, regulators and your customers and business partners demand you to protect data you control. In turn, you require your vendors to protect your data. Is substantial investment sustainable and the only response to growing information security risk?While ongoing investment is necessary and prudent, focusing on foundational controls may help lower your risk with very little cost. This article will highlight ten cost-conscious security controls you may implement without breaking your budget. While the scope and depth will vary, implementing foundation controls may help protect all businesses. Let’s begin with one the most important security controls.1. Enforce least privilegeIn all cases, employees should have only the minimum access to perform their duties. This includes leaders, managers, and especially system administrators with privileged access. Decisions to permit access to sensitive information, data, systems, software, and applications should be based on a defined business need; not by title or perceived need. For example, a manager may only require permissions to read sensitive data. Managers should periodically review access and make adjustments continue reading »last_img read more

READ MORE

first_img 8SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Mark Arnold Mark Arnold is an acclaimed speaker, brand expert and strategic planner helping businesses such as credit unions and banks achieve their goals with strategic marketing insights and energized training. Mark … Web: www.markarnold.com Details Most progressive credit unions understand that developing, maintaining and training to a strong brand culture and the member experience is critical to growth. Brand has been and continues to be a compelling buzzword in the industry.However, one area in which credit unions can improve/enlarge their understanding of brand and branding comes much earlier than employee training. Truly successful credit union brands look at the process much earlier, during the new hire process.Turnover, especially for certain front-line positions, will likely always be a challenge for credit unions. However, that doesn’t excuse poor and/or quick hiring choices just for the sake getting a warm body in a chair. Your brand deserves the right people in the right chairs and if the hiring process takes a bit longer, so be it.During the hiring process your credit union must think about propensity of individual candidates to best live your unique brand culture. The interview and hiring funnel should therefore be replete with brand-centered thoughts, ideas, testing and questions for new hire candidates. If your credit union hires people with a greater upfront propensity to live the brand, you’re really accomplishing two things. One – you’re protecting the brand by putting a brand cheerleader in his or her role from day one. Two – you’re actually lessening overall potential turnover since the odds are slimmer with this brand-centered new hire that he or she will either independently opt-out of your credit union brand or be released due to lack of brand adherence. While a number of retailers have implemented versions of the “pay employees to quit” policy, a more recent and compelling example comes from Amazon. Like any retailer, Amazon has its own unique brand and employee culture which is not necessarily the right fit for every person. “We want people working at Amazon who want to be here,” noted an Amazon spokesperson. The exact same criteria must apply at your credit union when it comes to hiring to match the brand. If you’re not hiring people that want to be there (or that are there nominally, at best for just the paycheck) you’re not doing right by your brand, your members or your entire team of employees. Those not dedicated to the brand are much more likely to criticize and/or spoil the entire brand culture for everyone else. These “brand poisoners” can drag down the entire brand culture for everyone.While the “pay employees to quit” model may not be the best fit for your credit union, the philosophy behind it likely is. A key takeaway is that your credit union is less likely to face the “pay employees to quit” dilemma if it take steps now to ensure that brand and member experience standards and expectations are fully in play from the beginning of anyones’ tenure, which definitely includes the new hire process.At any credit union, the most important title of any employee is “brand ambassador.” By focusing on hiring brand ambassadors, your credit union is less likely to struggle with the challenges of replacing former employees who were never the right fit for your culture.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York By Marianne GarvinI’ve been involved in the effort to build affordable housing on Long Island for more than three decades–most of that time at the Community Development Corporation of Long Island. One of the most encouraging trends that I’ve seen is the increasing decline of the NIMBY (“Not In My Back Yard”) attitude that has been far too prevalent on Long Island. I’m more hopeful than ever that its decline will now pick up speed.I understand the instinct. LI is primarily a community of single-family homes. Our homes represent a sizeable investment for every property owner, and it’s natural to want to protect that investment. Local home rule also gives us residents the chance to participate in decisions about how our communities grow, and I’m part of that process in Stony Brook, where I live, as well.The problem is that the Island is cutting itself out of the job market, because our housing is so expensive. Neighboring suburbs in Westchester, southern Connecticut and northern New Jersey are attracting the businesses and jobs that should be coming here and should be providing employment for our children and growing our tax base.Affordable housing now addresses a broader need than ever: young people who want to live here but can’t afford it, seniors who want to downsize, people in transitions of one kind or another, and others with lower incomes. The good news is that affordable housing—and the need for it—has evolved to a point where there is growing momentum behind it for a number of reasons.First, there are more and more positive examples of high-quality affordable housing on Long Island that have now been in place for years and have proven to be an asset to their community. A great example is Patchogue village, which is thriving after about a decade. It’s attracting people who want to live downtown, and they are adding vitality to the area, its restaurants and performing arts.Early supporters of affordable housing had to operate on faith. Later adopters can see positive examples and operate on proof.Second, affordable housing is helping rejuvenate many downtowns, and those downtowns are growing in popularity, precisely because they offer added opportunities for dining and entertainment. Even in our single-family homes, we like having more choices when we go out to eat or attend art events and performances.Third, in communities across LI, residents and government officials are increasingly discussing their planning priorities for downtown development including greater density. That opens up the possibility of affordable housing, because density is key to affordability.A great example is Wincoram Commons, which recently opened in a new hamlet center in Coram. Creating the hamlet center was a community priority. Wincoram Commons adds 176 affordable apartments as well as shops along the main street, bringing new vitality to the area.Communities that have embraced these discussions—and the planning that results—have made clear their priorities. Those of us involved in creating affordable housing can then address them.Fourth, more Long Islanders know people who want and need affordable housing. They may well include their own family members and even their own children.Part of the change is generational. Young people want rental properties they can afford. They want a lively downtown, where they can live near a train station with easy access to New York City and can have dinner with friends and be entertained.While the Island has the extraordinary infrastructure of the Long Island Rail Road, which serves many downtowns, affordable transit-oriented housing is far too rare. That reality poses a great threat to the region, because 70 percent of Long Islanders 18- to 34-years-old say they will leave Long Island by 2020, according to the Long Island Index. But that reality also holds great promise.The housing that we at CDCLI develop serves people with incomes up to 120 percent of the area median income, because we want it to represent a broader mix of income levels. In the last seven years or so, nearly all of the housing that we’ve developed has been rental property that is transit-oriented and also removes blight. These developments are, therefore, a win-win-win–addressing a range of incomes, revitalizing downtowns and removing blight.Similar victories are stacking up on LI, and their appeal is the reason that I’m optimistic about the future of affordable housing here. NIMBY must increasingly compete with the benefits of well-planned, well-designed, affordable housing and the added reality that building it will enable our children and grandchildren to stay in our region.Marianne Garvin is president and CEO of the Community Development Corporation of Long Island and president of the National NeighborWorks Association.Illustration by two-time Pulitzer Prize-winner Walt Handelsmanlast_img read more

READ MORE

first_img“Remember that corruption during disasters is punishable by death,” Firli said in a press statement Saturday.He invoked Article 2 of the 2001 Anticorruption Law, which states that the maximum penalty could be given under certain circumstances.No corruption convict in Indonesia has ever been given the death sentence. The decision to mete sentences is in the hands of the court, which has to take into account mitigating circumstances.Despite the government’s instructions last week for everyone to work from home, all KPK staffers, including investigators, will continue to work from their office in Kuningan, South Jakarta, Firli said. The Corruption Eradication Commission (KPK) wants the death penalty for people convicted of corruption during the COVID-19 outbreak, in a stark turnabout from its recent focus on prevention instead of actively pursuing investigations.According to KPK chairman Firli Bahuri, the agency will be going for the maximum penalty allowed under the law.With the government pouring Rp 62.3 trillion (US$3.9 billion) into nationwide measures to combat COVID-19 and launching social safety net programs, there are growing fears that much of that money could be embezzled. When he landed the position of KPK chairman in December 2019, the police commissioner general vowed to work on preventing corruption and fostering better coordination with government institutions, which previously had been the target of many KPK investigations.His new approach came with the new KPK Law enacted in October, which effectively took away much of the antigraft body’s independence and some of its more effective investigating tools, including wiretapping.Among the major projects initiated is the conversion of Wisma Atlet Kemayoran in Central Jakarta into a hospital and using two small islands in Riau Islands province to accommodate thousands of COVID-19 patients.Firli warned not to expect the KPK to conduct raids or sting operations to catch corruption suspects in the act, a method that proved effective in the past.“We understand that many critics want to see KPK raids and they want results,” he said, taking note of the declining public trust in his agency as shown by several recent surveys.“But we don’t conduct raids as a goal or a gimmick just to show that the KPK is working.” (mfp)Topics :last_img read more

READ MORE