January 27, 2021
  • 6:51 am Students taste South Bend’s international food
  • 6:50 am Community members shave heads for charity
  • 6:45 am Dating violence incident reported to University
  • 6:45 am Saint Mary’s construction continues on campus
  • 6:41 am ROTC vigil celebrates Veterans Day

first_imgArmy, Navy and Air Force Reserve Officers’ Training Corps (ROTC) cadets kept vigil for 24 hours at the Clarke Memorial Fountain, starting Monday and ending Tuesday afternoon. Cadets had 30-minute shifts, and at the conclusion of the 24 hours, a celebration was held in honor of Veterans Day.Freshman Parker McDowell’s shift began at 4:30 a.m. Despite the chilly morning, with wind blowing water from the fountain onto the cadets, McDowell said he enjoyed the demonstration.“It was actually pretty enjoyable,” McDowell said. “It was a good chance to reflect on why we were there in the first place, honoring those who have lost their lives in wars.” ANNIE SMIERCIAK | The Observer Notre Dame Reserve Officers’ Training Corps kept vigil for 24 hours prior to their ceremony honoring Veterans Day, starting Monday and ending Tuesday afternoon.The Clarke Memorial Fountain, known around campus as Stonehenge, was dedicated in 1986 to Notre Dame alumni who gave their lives in service to this country. The fountain specifically honors the 500 alumni who died in World War II, Korea and Vietnam. “Pro Patria et Pace,” meaning “For Country and Peace,” is inscribed in the base of the fountain.Around campus, the fountain is better known for the tradition of students running through the water after winning a home football game. Drawing attention to the true meaning behind the fountain is part of why cadets stand vigil for 24 hours.“We walk by Stonehenge every day just going to class, but no one really thinks about it because it just passes over our eyes, but having people stationed there and standing watch on each side of the fountain for 24 hours straight, through the middle of the night, it really forces people to think about why [the fountain] is there,” McDowell said.At the conclusion of the 24 hours on Tuesday at 5:00 p.m., all ROTC faculty, staff, cadets and midshipmen gathered at the fountain for a tri-military celebration of Veterans Day. The celebration began with the introduction of the official party and a benediction by Fr. Peter Rocca.Lieutenant colonel Christopher Pratt, commanding officer of the Notre Dame Army ROTC and professor of military science, took the podium to introduce the guest speaker for the celebration: Honorable Judge Michael G. Gotsch. Gotsch is currently the magistrate judge in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Indiana.Prior to becoming a judge, Gotsch was commissioned at Notre Dame as a part of Army ROTC in 1979. He was a military intelligence officer, and he rose to the rank of captain. While on active duty, he was awarded the Meritorious Service Medal, the Army Commendation Medal and the Army Achievement Medal. After leaving active duty, he returned to Notre Dame and graduated with a law degree in 1987.Gotsch began his speech by praising the Notre Dame ROTC and remembering his time as a cadet.“I remember morning runs around the lake, and afternoon drills in the Stepan Center,” Gotsch said.Gotsch then reminded the audience of the conditions that veterans have faced in wars, listing the intense physical challenges from weather and other factors.“Many of these veterans didn’t ask to leave their homes to fight on distant battlefields. They didn’t go because they loved combat or glory,” Gotsch said. “Rather, they went because their country asked them to … They were ordinary people who responded to extraordinary challenge with exceptional courage.”He then welcomed the cadets into a long line of Notre Dame alumni who have courageously served this country.“The original Fighting Irish — an unbroken tradition of service [that] each of you is now a part of,” said Gotsch.Gotsch left the cadets with a final piece of advice.“The motto of the U.S. Army veritas, ‘veritas vigilantia victoria’ which means truth, vigilance and victory,” Gotsch said. “If you keep those concepts in mind and apply the values you’ve learned here — God, Country and Notre Dame— you will be excellent military officers, and you will continue to be a credit to yourselves, your families and your alma mater.”The celebration was concluded by the playing of Taps and a benediction by Rocca, who left the audience with a reminder of the importance of true and lasting peace.Tags: Clarke Memorial Fountain, ROTC, Veterans Day, vigillast_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgAdriana Perez | The Observer At the end of the steps of Main Building, by the entrance to the second floor, fabric covers a mural of Queen Isabella I of Spain. The tapestry depicts local flora and fauna, as well as imagery important for both Indigenous and Christian traditions.When the initial decision to cover the murals was made in Jan. 2019, many denounced it publicly. Yet other individuals and groups supported it, like the student senate, Student Government, College Democrats, BridgeND’s vice president and the Observer Editorial Board.But some — who appreciated the decision — also expressed that acknowledging Native heritage while aiming toward a more diverse and inclusive Notre Dame required an approach more nuanced than just covering the murals.“A curtain can be easy and cheap, both intellectually and financially. What a university with real vision, with real character, must do is face the challenge head on, to its core,” Christian Moevs, associate professor of Italian studies, wrote in a Letter to the Editor published Feb. 19, 2019.Where do we go from here?A similar sentiment to that expressed by Moevs remains even today, as students, faculty and staff reflect on the recent covering of the Columbus Murals and where the University can go from here.“We did a lot of heavy lifting, and to finally see something come of that — it was good,” senior Marcus Winchester-Jones, treasurer of the Native American Student Association at Notre Dame (NASAND), said of the murals being covered. Winchester-Jones is a member of the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi.Notre Dame is “heading in the right direction with that move,” he said. “But there’s still a lot of work to be done, for sure.”In their report, the Columbus Murals Committee had offered two additional recommendations “concerning further actions the University might take to foster continuing conversation, teaching and research about the murals and their various contexts,” per the cover letter.The first additional recommendation was to announce a University-wide observance of Founder’s Day “on the feast day of St. Edward the Confessor (October 13), thus occurring close to but not coinciding with Columbus Day,” according to the committee’s report.A celebration of Founder’s Day would display the murals and invite dialogue about them in connection with a scholarly symposium or teach-in exploring Notre Dame’s early history.The committee also recommended that Native American communities integral to the University’s founding — such as the Pokagon Band of Potawatomi — be concretely and tangibly recognized, with a monumental sculpture, a prominent land acknowledgment or the establishment of more scholarships for Native American students.NASAND has asked the University to officially recognize the second Monday of October as Indigenous Peoples’ Day — a day in which the United States has traditionally observed the anniversary of Columbus’ arrival to the Americas, with Columbus Day.“We’re not asking much,” Winchester-Jones said. He added that the change would be an indication to NASAND that “even though we’re small, we’re mighty. And we can get things done, even though the Native population and those interested in the culture aren’t always large in numbers.”The University has not officially acknowledged Indigenous Peoples’ Day, but it also does not recognize Columbus Day, “given that it is a day of classes and work for our campus community,” Firth said. Students, faculty and staff are expected to continue with their normal daily activities as if it were a normal day, not a federal holiday.As of 2019, “at least ten states now celebrate some version of Indigenous Peoples’ Day… Many college campuses have dumped Columbus Day for Indigenous Peoples’ Day as have more than 100 cities, towns and counties across the country,” according to NPR. Some of the colleges that have done so include Syracuse, Johns Hopkins and Columbia University.“In the future, if I had to imagine Indigenous Peoples’ Day [at Notre Dame], I think it’d be cool to have a powwow on that day,” Winchester-Jones said. A powwow is a traditional celebration of Native American culture with a social gathering for dancing and singing.Winchester-Jones also mentioned other ways in which Notre Dame could honor Indigenous Peoples’ Day, such as an email blast acknowledging the celebration or a special dinner at the dining halls.Marisel Moreno, associate professor of Romance languages and literatures and member of the Columbus Murals Committee, told The Observer in an email that “celebrating Indigenous Peoples’ Day… is about lifting the veil of invisibility that erases them from the present national narrative, relegating them to a distant past.”“In the midst of the social reckoning in which we find ourselves, the fight against racism — in all its forms — must confront our sanitized views of the past,” she added.Referring to the committees’ additional recommendations, Moreno said celebrating Native American heritage on a particular day would include “close collaboration with Pokagon and Potawatomi communities to plan public celebrations as well as talks and panels centering them.”While the pandemic has put some of these plans on hold, she said, “Notre Dame is committed to recognize and celebrate Indigenous Peoples’ Day.”Recognition of Native heritage and the University’s presence on Native land need not be confined to a single day, either. There are other tangible and symbolic ways of celebrating the contributions of Native Americans to the University, similar to those recommended by the Columbus Murals Committee.“Some universities provide free tuition to tribal peoples [whose] lands they inhabit,” Collier, NAI’s director, told The Observer. These universities including Miami University of Ohio and Florida State University.Collier also talked about the possibility of carrying out land acknowledgements at University-sponsored events such as football games.“Welcome to Notre Dame Stadium. You are in the traditional homeland of the Pokagon Potawatomi people and the home of the Fighting Irish,” he said, changing his voice to briefly adopt the role of broadcaster.About the stadium, Winchester-Jones said he thinks “it’d be cool if they had a Pokagon flag up there.”These acknowledgements would bring more business to the Pokagon Band’s Four Winds casino, Collier added, “because all of that money that they get from the casino pays for healthcare, food and housing for Pokagon people.”“We may be on the nicest piece of land in the entire Midwest,” Collier said. “So, there should be somebody that we’re thanking for that.”Tags: Christopher Columbus Day, Christopher Columbus murals, Main Building Inside the Main Building, native flora and fauna — vines, rabbits, mice, flowers, turtles and trees — decorate fabric that resembles thick, colorful tapestries. While these coverings are new, the paintings that lie underneath are almost as old as the University itself.The controversy over the Columbus Murals, painted by Luigi Gregori in the early 1880s and located by the undergraduate admissions office in Notre Dame’s Main Building, is not recent either. For years before their covering, calls to either conceal them or leave them uncovered have resonated throughout the University community.Looking backDuring her time at the University, alumna and journalist Nikole Hannah-Jones (‘98) protested the murals alongside other students of color. She then wrote a response to a Letter to the Editor that had denounced the protests.The author of the Letter to the Editor had written that “it is Columbus, and the followers of Columbus who, for all their misdeeds along the way, set up the institutions which both bring the Indians back to the natural law and introduce them to the way of salvation… God bless Columbus and his murals!”“Yes, it was Columbus that set the platforms for these racist American institutions. A devil calling someone a savage is like the pot calling the kettle black,” Hannah-Jones responded, back in 1995.In 2003, an Observer columnist wrote that the murals “celebrated genocide under the Dome.” And in the few years leading up to the historic decision to cover them, the community once again engaged in similar conversation. In 2014, The Observer’s editorial board wrote about the need to acknowledge the history between Notre Dame and Native Americans.After the Native American Student Association of Notre Dame (NASAND) protested the Columbus murals in Oct. 2017, the topic resurfaced in the campus community, spurring a series of Letters to the Editor and events that culminated in a petition signed by over 300 professors and students, calling for the removal of the murals. Activist group Rising Tide Michiana then unfurled a protest banner in Hesburgh Library.Where are we now?Then, on Jan. 2019, University President Fr. John Jenkins announced the murals would be covered — a decision that drew both support and criticism from within and outside the University. Delays in the murals’ covering also caused confusion: It was more than a year after this first announcement that the paintings were finally covered in Sept. 2020.The initial decision had been followed by the selection of a committee on Feb. 14, 2019 that would advise Fr. Jenkins on how to go about fulfilling his proposal.“The committee recommended that the installation of the mural coverings coincide with the installation of a new permanent exhibition regarding the University’s early history,” Ann Firth, vice chair of the Columbus Murals Committee and chief of staff to Fr. Jenkins, said in an email to The Observer.The initial recommendation and plan was that the permanent exhibition would be installed next to the original murals — which would already be covered — on the second floor of the Main Building, once the office of undergraduate admissions moved to McKenna Hall by 2022, according to the report. However, the COVID-19 pandemic has slowed down this process for at least a year, and perhaps for longer, Firth said.“That reality, coupled with the urgency of the national and campus dialogues on issues of racial justice as Fr. Jenkins referenced in his August 24 letter to the campus community contributed to the decision to install the coverings now, rather than at a date at least 2 years in the future,” Firth said.Because of this delay, the installation of a temporary exhibit with context regarding the murals and the coverings was also planned for Dec. 2020, Firth said.The coverings are removable so that faculty may request access to the murals for their classes and so that they can be displayed occasionally, according to the Aug. 24 letter. Besides displaying local biodiversity, the design on the coverings’ fabric is meant to “fuse the European aesthetic with that of indigenous peoples,” Firth said. Brian Collier, interim director of Native American Initiatives (NAI) and director of the American Indian Catholic Schools Network (AICSN), pointed out that the turtle is a central part of creation stories for Native Americans, as is the tree of life in Christianity. Both symbols can be seen on many of the coverings.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_img Kelli O’Hara View Comments Star Files The Bridges of Madison County, starring four-time Tony nominee Kelli O’Hara and Steven Pasquale and directed by Tony winner Bartlett Sher, tells the story of housewife Francesca Johnson and photographer Robert Kincaid, their chance encounter and the unlikely four-day love affair that leaves them caught between decision and desire. Additional cast members include Hunter Foster, Cass Morgan, Michael X. Martin, Derek Klena and Caitlin Kinnunen. The cast album for Jason Robert Brown’s The Bridges of Madison County is just “One Second and A Million Miles” away, give or take a couple of weeks. The previously announced cast recording will be released by Ghostlight records digitally on April 15, with the CD in stores on May 20. Broadway.com made a visit to the recording studio on March 3 as the cast preserved the romantic score. Fans can pre-order the album on the Sh-K-Boom website. The Bridges of Madison County Show Closed This production ended its run on May 18, 2014 Derek Klena Before fans take a listen to tracks such as “Falling Into You,” “Another Life” and “It All Fades Away” in their own homes, they can catch The Bridges of Madison County at Broadway’s Gerald Schoenfeld Theatre. The musical celebrated its official opening on February 20. Related Shows Steven Pasqualelast_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgWhat It TakesIt’s not often you hear about kids finishing high school at age 15 to pursue a career as an Olympic freestyle aerial skier, especially kids from the Mid-Atlantic.That, however, is exactly what Virginia native Ashley Caldwell did. Though the Blue Ridge is rarely recognized as a world-class skiing destination, that doesn’t mean our slopes can’t produce some top-notch shredders.From the runs of Round Top to the routine floor at Apex Gymnastics, Caldwell’s childhood was defined by pushing limits. That’s why when she saw U.S. aerial freestyle skier Jeret “Speedy” Peterson land a triple backflip with five twists in the 2006 Winter Olympics, Caldwell’s immediate thought was, “I can do that.”And do that she did. At age 14, Caldwell left her home in Ashburn, Va., to try out for the U.S. Olympic Ski Team in Lake Placid, N.Y. The coaches there were so impressed that they signed her on under the training of Russian coach Dmitriy Kavunov. She moved north to train full-time and just two years later, Caldwell would become the youngest to compete on the U.S. Olympics team, placing 10th overall in the 2010 Vancouver Olympics.She’s since racked up the World Cup rookie of the year for women’s aerials and two World Cup podiums (gold and silver). She’s a four-time NorAm winner, a two-time U.S. Nationals silver medalist, a 2014 U.S. National Champion, a top 10 finisher in the 2014 Sochi Olympics, and the only U.S. female athlete who can land triples in competition. Even more impressive is the fact that she’s managed to accomplish all of this before becoming old enough to legally celebrate such victories with a cold beer.ashley-caldwell-vertHer road to success hasn’t been an easy journey, as she’ll be the first to tell you. At just 18 years old, Caldwell had already torn both of her ACLs, injuries that set her on the sidelines for two seasons. That certainly hasn’t slowed her down any, and Caldwell is well on the way to claiming her rightful spot on the podium in the 2018 Winter Olympics.So what’s it like to be an Olympic superstar? What does it take to launch your body over 60 feet in the air, throw a few flips and twists for good measure, and then smoothly land back on terra firma? Though Herculean in feat, Caldwell is, at the end of the day, just like any 21-year-old girl—charming, goofy, and a sucker for cookie dough.Those jumps look scary. Do people ever think you’re crazy?Yeah, some people don’t get why I do it. On the one hand, it is very crazy, but it’s extremely fun. I live for the fun of being scared and overcoming that fear.So, if hurling yourself into the air doesn’t scare you, what does?Not getting better at something—not just aerials but life.Most of the tricks look pretty similar. Don’t you get bored?It’s a technical sport, so you’re aiming for perfection. But yes, training the same tricks can sometimes get a little boring.How do you train in the off-season?Trampolines, swimming pools, and videos.What’s your signature trick? Full full full. That’s a triple flip with three twists.What do you do to get pumped to compete?Honestly, nothing. I just try to be the weirdest person at the top of the hill. You can’t take it too seriously.Really? You don’t even jam to some tunes pre-comp?During training, we listen to Alt Nation. Right now my favorite song is Stolen Dance by Milky Chance. Everybody knows I have to jump when that song comes on.How do you fuel up for the big day? Pounds of pasta? I’m a big fan of sweet potatoes. But also lots of cookie dough and whipped cream. I don’t know if my coach would be too psyched I said that, and I’m all for eating healthy, but I believe if you’re happy, you’re going to train better.You’ve skied around the world. Where’s your favorite place to shred it up?I don’t know if I could say I have a favorite, but there’s nothing like home turf (Park City, Utah).What about in our neck of the woods?I started skiing when I was around 3 years old. My dad was the one that taught me. So places like Round Top in Virginia and Snowshoe and Seven Springs, those were where my skiing really took off.Do you plan on being a professional skier forever?God I hope not. I have a degree in finance and I’d like to get my MBA in the future. My dad is into real estate development, so I want to follow in his footsteps one day.What advice would you give Olympic-hopeful athletes?Train hard, but play harder.When you’re not on the slopes what are you doing?Hanging out with friends. Bouncing around on a trampoline. I also like to read a lot.Reading? Any favorite books?Ayn Rand’s Atlas Shrugged is definitely a favorite. And Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance. Any words of wisdom you’ve taken away from those readings?From the books? No. But have you ever seen How I Met Your Mother? My go-to quote comes from Barney—“Whenever I’m being lame, I just stop and be awesome instead.”I think I know the answer to this already, but I’ll give it a whirl. What’s your favorite season?Summer.Summer? That doesn’t make sense.You’d be surprised how many winter athletes hate the cold. I love what I do, but I wish I could do it at a beach.The beach, huh? So what’s your favorite beach?I would say Hawaii, but that’s not fair. The Outer Banks in North Carolina is awesome. I just started surfing and I love it.Are you any good at it?Not yet. It’s cool because it’s a lot like freestyle aerial skiing—you only get a split-second chance to do it right.So if you had to choose, would you live on snowy slopes or in tropical bliss?I think ideally I want to live with a few people on a beach somewhere where I can surf and read books all day.Dogs or cats?Dogs. I’m allergic to cats. They make my eyes swell shut.Ski hero?Ryan St. Onge. But I may be biased. He’s my boyfriend.Somewhere you want to ski but haven’t yet?Anywhere in the Swiss Alps. Or the backcountry of Alaska. That’d be sweet.Coffee or hot chocolate?Coffee. But with extra whipped cream.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgBy Dialogo July 06, 2015 We often see on the Internet the progress of projects entrusted to the Army’s engineering squad in contrast to the fiasco of projects of contractors who only want to add more and more amendments to contracts. The difference in costs, sometimes within the same project, e.g. the San Francisco River Transposition Project, is an insult to taxpayers. Every project done by the Brazilian Army of Engineering has always been and will always be careful work with affirmative and excellent results. Using the argument of physical evidence, all you have to do is look (even at the surface) of the masterful and HONEST construction of the amazing BECS. Congratulations to our Brazilian Army. I liked it. Very good. Now, let’s move forward. The article doesn’t provide much information about the process, but I’ve worked in the institution and trust what goes on there. I think it’s great. All cities need it. Whatever benefits our country will always be welcome. It’s a good idea that fits within the framework of principles governing the Disciplinary Regulations of the Army. The NATION is suffering and weary. It’s time to make decisions with determination and raise the spirits of the population. The nation’s defense is the defense of its citizens, who have the right to a roof over their heads. Congratulations to the Brazilian Army for the innovative technology. I was happy to read this article about our glorious Brazilian Army which I was a part of. It’s so nice to read good news about love and hard work love, and not thievery. This country has to regain faith in their government institutions and punish the gangs of corrupt officials and thieves. Only the Army has the ability to bring peace to our hearts. Long live Brazil. I loved all the collages. All beautiful, wonderful, and vivid. I loved it so much. Thank you. I really liked this partnership of knowledge. The Army really needs to help Brazil. The main point is called HONESTY, but it is of utmost importance that no politicians be involved. When will our glorious Brazilian Army complete BR 319 which links Manaus in Amazonas to Porto Velho in Rondoni? It’s only 877 km. Use the powerful tool called OPUS to resolve this problem. Congratulations on the report. The Army has the technology and skill for building at a more affordable cost. My father, a great warrior, fought in Italy. He participated in taking over Castle Hill where he saw many friends die. Now, I ask the question. Was this all done in vain? Now Brazil, this is our homeland. Those of you in command of this country need to take action immediately. I am ready to fight for my country. Force and honour. The Brazilian Army’s participation in the country’s work is commendable. I did like it. If we have this work, then why not use it? I was surprised and very happy to know that the Brazilian Army also provides support to the less fortunate. Congratulations. Congratulations to the Brazilian Army and its OPUS program. The program is working in the Army because certain parameters are observed such as commitment, discipline, professionalism, integrity and quality, while the works contracted by government administrations, whether municipal, state or federal, prioritize other parameters such as overcharging, poor quality service, deadline extensions for the main purpose of increasing funding, higher spending on food, transportation stipends, electricity, water, labor charges, overtime, etc. We need to always believe in the Armed Forces and the institution of MORAL RESERVE since we still have faith in Brazil. In particular, Minister Kassab reviewed during his May 20 visit the Unified Works Process System, OPUS [Oracle Project Unified Solution], which the Army Engineering and Construction Department (DEC) uses in planning, decision-making, execution, control, and financing of works the agency performs. Its success with OPUS has led a working group consisting of the CDU in the House of Representatives, the Federal Savings Bank, the Ministry of Cities, and the Army to announce the use of the same method in all phases of the Minha Casa, Minha Vida [My House, My Life] program — a project planned by the Ministry of Cities. The benefits of OPUS Government officials will meet in the near future to develop a plan to finalize the execution of an agreement among the Brazilian Army, the Ministry of Cities, the Federal House of Representatives, and the Federal Savings Bank in the process of transferring the Army DEC’s methodology to other institutions. This action will yield benefits for society, since it will mean improved management in monitoring and controlling the country’s public works. Brazilian Minister of Cities Gilberto Kassab recently visited the Army Command in Brasília to learn about management technology used by the Army in its engineering and construction works. OPUS is an information technology system that supports decision-making in planning, finance, project execution, and engineering services, both at the executive level and at the management and strategic level. OPUS allows the user to simultaneously see and track all of the Army’s work projects, from the decision to initiate to completion. The Army DEC is using the technology to manage projects for the Ministry of Cities, including the Minha Casa, Minha Vida program, the largest housing program being built in Brazil since its launch in 2009 by the federal government. Its goal is to reduce the housing gap in the country, both in the cities and in the countryside. Housing project “Currently, no one can think about defense as an isolated matter; we have something to contribute to the country in relation to technology, teaching, and other processes when we speak of engineering. We are willing to sit down and contribute to the country’s progress,” he emphasized. The optimization and cost-effectiveness gained by using OPUS yields benefits for all of Brazilian society, said the Chief of DEC, General Joaquim Maia Brandão. center_img Finalizing an agreement Through the program, families with a household income of between about $500 and $1,590 can receive a subsidy worth up to $8,000, taxes of 0-5% per year, and a term of 360 months to pay for the home. Since its launch, Minha Casa, Minha Vida has delivered more than two million homes to needy families throughout the country. The initiative is an example of the Army working with different ministries to benefit society, said Santiago Gallo, a territorial planning specialist at the University of São Paulo. “The important part is the management of all stages of a project, from strategic decisions through the final product. If we have planning, control, and finance oversight, it is possible to reach our project goals,” the General told Diálogo. General Villas Bôas, the commander of the Brazilian Army, has placed his forces at the disposal of agencies that are attempting to learn the management process used for military works. Another Military official, General Marcelo Eschiletti Caldas Rodrigues, director of the Military Works System (SOM) described to Diálogo how OPUS works and its benefits. “It is a computerized system to support decisions regarding the functionality of planning, scheduling, supervising, monitoring and control, management and execution of work projects, and engineering services in all final macro process activities in the SOM, both at the executive level and at the management and strategic level,” he said. One of its benefits is that “it lets the user see and follow all of the Army’s projects and their schedule, from project initiation through closing.” The technology used in the Brazilian Army’s projects through OPUS is essential for Minha Casa, Minha Vida. “Some 7,000 projects are being executed at the Ministry and the Army has a methodology that could be used in managing the Minha Casa, Minha Vida project, as well as others,” Minister Kassab said.last_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Book on Plum Island TalkGeoffrey Fleming and Amy Folk, the authors of the recently published A World Unto Itself: The Remarkable History of Plum Island, will discuss the long hidden history of this mysterious isle off the North Fork of Long Island. Beginning with the glacial origins of the island, the historians introduce readers to the fascinating chronicle that places the island in the broader context of American history, with an emphasis on the “Fort Terry years.” Plum Island is, as the authors emphasize, both a world unto itself and a microcosm of our world. Suffolk County Historical Society Museum, 300 West Main St., Riverhead. suffolkcountyhistoricalsociety.org $5. 6 p.m. Dec. 4.Triple DivideA revelatory film about fracking that came about as the result of a three-year investigation into government and industry data as well as firsthand testimony from affected Pennsylvania citizens and leaseholders. Come for the film, stay for refreshments and discussion with staff members of both New Yorkers Against Fracking and Food & Water Watch. Cinema Arts Centre, 423 Park Ave., Huntington. cinemaartscentre.org $6 members, $11 public. 7:30 p.m. Dec. 4. Joe WalshNo rocker plays guitar like Joe Walsh. He’ll always be that hard-hitter with the blazing licks like the ones he laid down with the James Gang, when he made a name for himself with “Funk 49” in 1969. He’s recently updated that number with “Funk 50,” a tune from his first solo release in 20 years. Called Analog Man, his new album is produced by Jeff Lynne, who gave Electric Light Orchestra and The Traveling Wilburys their lush harmonies, intricate arrangements and dense sound. Over the years Joe sometimes flies with The Eagles but he’ll be winging it himself on LI. As his song titles say, “Life’s Been Good” for this anything but “Ordinary Average Guy.” The Paramount, 370 New York Ave., Huntington. paramountny.com $50-$125. 8 p.m. Dec. 4.The Irish TenorsOh, Danny Boy! Twice a year, around St. Patrick’s Day and the Christmas Holidays, the Irish Tenors dazzle and delight audiences around the world with their musical performances. Since their debut in 1999 on PBS, these musical marvels have been charming fans with their signature Irish ballads and classics. Sing along with Finbar Wright, Anthony Kearns, and Ronan Tynan as they bring their voices and their talents to LI as part of The Irish Holiday Tour. NYCB Theatre at Westbury, 960 Brush Hollow Rd., Westbury. venue.thetheatreatwestbury.com $49.50-$62.50. 8 p.m. Dec. 4.Hitler’s Secret Weapon: Media Marketing in the HolocaustLinda F. Burghardt, a journalist and author from Great Neck, tells the story of the multi-faceted assault on the Jews through mass communication—how it was powered, why it worked, how it was created and what it says about the media today. Using archival photos and artwork, she will explain how the media managed to turn ordinary citizens into Nazis and succeeded in selling the idea of genocide to the German people. Holocaust Memorial & Tolerance Center, Welwyn Preserve, 100 Crescent Beach Rd., Glen Cove. HMTCLI.org 10 a.m. Dec. 5.Dennis MillerCaustic, cerebral, and conservative Dennis Miller will take to the stage to enlighten and entertain audiences with his observational humor that will touch on all kinds of right-leaning political subjects. Try to keep up with the lightening speed of his tongue-thrashing. Bring your dictionary to decipher words he throws out that rarely see the light of day in academia, let alone comedy. Go along for the ride through the twists and turns or literary analogies, sweeping history, and scathing critique. This former NFL commentator might also talk some football. The Paramount, 370 New York Ave., Huntington. paramountny.com $59.50-$99.50. 8 p.m. Dec. 5.David Bromberg QuintetThe Godfather of Americana is touring to promote his new album, Only Slightly Mad, which was released in September. Fans will find blues, bluegrass, gospel, folk, Irish fiddle tunes, pop and English drinking songs happily coexisting as they can only on a Bromberg album. Newcomers will be introduced to an astonishing performer whose range and musical depth have delighted audiences for more than 40 years. The Space at Westbury, 250 Post Ave., Westbury. thespaceatwestbury.com $40-$70. 8 p.m. Dec. 5. Amor a Nuestra MusicaThis annual Spanish Broadcasting System show-stopping multi-act extravaganza will include Latin pop stars Luis Fonsi, Ricardo Montaner, Jesse & Joy, Gloria Trevi, Pablo Alborán and Natalia Jiménez, along with Dominican bachatero Frank Reyes. Yes, you will be singing! Yes, you and your family and loved ones will be dancing throughout the aisles of The Old Barn! Yes, it will be Laetificus! Nassau Veterans Memorial Coliseum, 1255 Hempstead Tpke., Uniondale. Nassaucoliseum.com $22.16-$115.15. 8:30 p.m. Dec. 5.19th Annual Dickens FestivalAn annual Village celebration of the author of A Christmas Carol, this holiday extravaganza features costumed characters, decorated streets and shops, Victorian entertainment and food. It kicks off with a festival of trees that includes ice-skating characters and giant snowmen at 7 p.m. Dec. 5, followed by a long list of caroling, performances and related events—even a gingerbread house contest before concluding in a Grand Final Parade! A full list of all programs can be found here portjeff.com/Dickens Mostly free. Dec. 5-7.Cinderella’s ChristmasThe most famous Disney princess of them all rings in the holiday season in a spectacular show of grace, skill and of course, magic beauty! NYCB Theatre at Westbury, 960 Brush Hollow Rd., Westbury. venue.thetheatreatwestbury.com $14.50.12 p.m. Dec. 6.Cheyenne JacksonHis music of the Mad Men era was lauded by critics. The New York Daily News wrote, “Cheyenne Jackson has got it all and he showed it all: the voice, the moves, the quirky self-effacing humor. He gleamed like Don Draper’s Brylcreemed hair.” Wow! Tilles Center for the Performing Arts at LIU Post Campus 720 Northern Blvd., Brookville. tillescenter.org $53. 7:30 p.m., 9:30 p.m. Dec. 6.Mike EppsThis stand-up comedian, actor, rapper and producer from Indiana has generated a huge amount of buzz since his big-screen breakthrough as Day-Day in Next Friday. His HBO comedy special, Inappropriate Behavior, was one of the network’s top-rated, hour-long specials of 2005. Now, he’s taking his hilarious show on the road with The Mike Epps After Dark Tour. NYCB Theatre at Westbury, 960 Brush Hollow Rd., Westbury. venue.thetheatreatwestbury.com $49.50-$84.25. 8 p.m. Dec. 6.Medeski, Scofield, Martin & WoodThis avant-jazz-funk supergroup has been bending and twisting the very fabric of music ever since their formation in 1991, then consisting of John Medeski on keyboards and piano, Billy Martin on drums and percussion and Chris Wood on double bass and bass guitar. Jazz guitar/composer virtuoso John “Sco” Scofield joins them to further push the boundaries of what is possible in the realm of aural enlightenment. Wowzler! Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center, 76 Main St., Westhampton Beach. whbpac.org $75-$115. 8 p.m. Dec. 6.Southside Johnny and the Asbury JukesLong regarded as the Godfather of the Jersey Shore Sound, John Lyon, better known by his stage name Southside Johnny, is an American original. Growing up in Ocean Grove and graduating from Neptune High, he followed in Bruce Springsteen’s shoes running down the boardwalk, hitting the high notes and laying it low with that bluesy soulfulness that only he can croon. It helped that Steven Van Zandt, the Boss’s compadre, penned Southside Johnny’s signature song, “I Don’t Want to Go Home.” And yes, that’s Southside and the Jukes performing as a bar band at the frat party in that action-packed classic Adventures in Babysitting. The guy’s been doing it right and working his ass off and we’re lucky to have him around keeping it real. The Space at Westbury, 250 Post Ave., Westbury. thespaceatwestbury.com $35-$65. 8 p.m. Dec. 6.CC Claus: A Baseball Christmas StoryCC Sabathia, the pitcher for the New York Yankees, and his son, Carsten, will talk about the MLB star’s new holiday-themed children’s book CC Claus: A Baseball Christmas Story. Book Revue, 313 New York Ave., Huntington. bookrevue.com Price of book. 7 p.m. Dec. 6.Mick JamesThe “undead” lead screamer/guitarist of his self-titled industrial/metal band makes his LI debut at this show organized by Rock N Ink, which includes tattoo vendors, giveaways, contests and models. Spike TV Ink Masters will also be in attendance. Warming up the crowd will be Tang and Fractured Smile. Revolution Bar and Music Hall, 140 Merrick Rd., Amityville revolutionli.com $15. 5 p.m. Dec. 7.Celtic Thunder Christmas SymphonyA dynamic live music experience, accompanied by a full Symphony Orchestra and favorite holiday songs from their latest CD Holiday Symphony. The music selection ranges from traditional carols “Away in A Manger,” “Silent Night” to classical pieces, holiday staples and the more contemporary “Fairytale of New York.” What a way to usher in this special and magical holiday season! NYCB Theatre at Westbury, 960 Brush Hollow Rd., Westbury. venue.thetheatreatwestbury.com $49.50-$84.25. 7 p.m. Dec. 7.TantricTouring behind their 2013 firebomb 37 Channels and latest comp, Blue Room Archives, which dropped just this September, these Louisville, Kentucky hell-raisers know how to rock. The band stomps their own footprints on what music critics describe as “post-grunge,” melding acoustic guitars, distorted, sonically muddy and heavy electric guitar and multi-layered vocal harmonies. Think Days Of The New (from where their original drummer, bassist and guitarist came) meets Alice In Chains, minus, obviously, the sheer addictive dread that was the irreplicable Jerry Cantrell-Layne Staley chemistry. With The Royal Guard, Lubricoma and Logan’s Room. The Emporium, 9 Railroad Ave., Patchogue. theemporiumny.com $16 advance, $20 DOS. 8 p.m. Dec. 7.KornThe dark, seismic nu-metal ring of hell that is this band has been leveling audiences, topping charts and racking up Grammy nominations and Awards almost the moment founding members Jonathan Davis (vocals), James “Munky” Shaffer (guitar), Brian “Head” Welch (guitar), Reginald “Fieldy” Arvizu (bass) and David Silveria (drums) began rehearsing together at a Huntington Beach, Calif. studio in 1993. They’ve influenced countless aspiring metal gods in thier wake, sold more than 35 million records to date, and bring all their infamous chaos, blackout noise and sheer, absolute fury to what will unquestionably be an absolutely insane performance at The Mountler. Don’t miss this gig! With Special Guest King 810. The Paramount, 370 New York Ave., Huntington. paramountny.com $59.50-$99. 8 p.m. Dec. 8.The 1975What is it about that date that inspired this English indie rock band to name it and claim it? Reportedly they found 1975 scrawled inside a book and it stuck with them as they moved on—and caught on. The Guardian said they were “the breakout act of 2013” with their funk-pop and R&B updated for the 21st century. One thing’s for sure, 2014 has been a very good year for Matt Healy, Adam Hann, George Daniel and Ross MacDonald, as these talented chums have played their biggest headline shows in the UK and their tour in the U.S. continues to gather steam.  Certainly Taylor Swift knows their number—or at least, she can reach lead singer Matt Healy’s private line whenever she likes. Sweet. With special guests CRUISR & Young Rising Sons. The Paramount, 370 New York Ave., Huntington. paramountny.com $30-$45. 8 p.m. Dec. 9.Adrian BelewQuick, who’s the world’s greatest experimental whammy twang bar czar lone rhino King Crimson stunt guitarist? The answer is: Yes, of course, Adrian Belew is all of those things and more. This amazing American multi-instrumentalist has been killing it on guitar for decades. How he started out back in Kentucky as a drummer in the Ludlow High School marching band and got to where he is today is a mythical story worthy of Homer. Belew claims he’s a creative force for the good of mankind, and god knows we need it. His unique career has taken him from Frank Zappa to Robert Fripp to David Bowie to Trent Reznor to who knows who’s next? What the Earth needs now is the music in this guy’s head. The Boulton Center, 37 West Main St., Bay Shore. boultoncenter.org $40-$45. 8 p.m. Dec. 10.Christina PerriThis 28-year-old singer/songwriter from Philly has got it all, in spades: sex appeal, attitude and talent. Her breakthrough came in 2010 when her torturously haunting single “Jar Of Hearts” was featured on an episode of So You Think You Can Dance, propelling the then-unsigned artists onto the top of the charts, and, into the hearts of millions of would-be fans. Its YouTube video (Watch Above) has since garnered nearly 140 million views. Yes, you read that correctly: 140 million (!!) views. Perri was launched into superstardom when her song “A Thousand Years” accompanied Edward and Bella in the first Twilight film. She credits much of her passion for music to her big brother Nick, who tooled off on guitar with everybody from Jane’s Addiction madman Perry Farrell to G&R’s skinman Matt Sorum. As legend goes, Perri learned to play by watching Blind Melon‘s Shannon Hoon (RIP) on a videotape of VH1. Known for her haunting lyrics and ethereal voice, she will undoubtedly knock out The Mountler at this intimate performance with powerful, moving songs from her second studio album Head or Heart, especially its debut hit single, “Human.” The question remains, however: Will she accompany Press music werewolf Zack Tirana for some satisfyingly dee-lishhh cold-slice pizza at Little Vincent’s, and perhaps a beer or two, in downtown Huntington, after the gig? Who the hell knows. Probably not, unfortunately. Actually, no shot at all. Never gonna happen. Really? None? Nada!? Well that sorta sucks, doesn’t it? Don’t miss this gig, part of her ongoing Head Or Heart Tour, regardless. With Special Guest Jukebox The Ghost. The Paramount, 370 New York Ave., Huntington. paramountny.com $30-$45. 8 p.m. Dec. 10.Bubba SparxxxThe country rapper from the backwoods of Georgia who burst on the scene in the early aughts with Ugly, featuring Timbaland, is touring to promote his fifth studio album, Made on McCosh Mill Road. Opening the show are Musick Medics, Decay The Savage, Alphamale and Rymiff & Jay Swiggy. The Emporium, 9 Railroad Ave., Patchogue. theemporiumny.com $18, $20 DOS. 8 p.m. Dec. 10.—Compiled by Spencer Rumsey, Jaime Franchi, Timothy Bolger & Zack Tiranalast_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgThe blizzard that struck the East Coast over the past weekend has led the House to postpone its return for another week, but NAFCU will continue to meet with congressional staff on issues important to credit unions and will monitor a CFPB field hearing on checking accounts.The Senate, so far still expected to come in tomorrow, has postponed all votes until at least Wednesday.A number of hearings have been postponed, including one slated by the House Financial Services Committee’s Task Force to Investigate Terrorism Financing to address trade-based money laundering; and another by the House Judiciary Subcommittee on Regulatory Reform, Commercial and Antitrust Law on the impact of federal regulations on American jobs, wages and startups. Both of these have been postponed until further notice.House Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady, R-Texas, last week postponed the committee’s first hearing of the year until Feb. 2. The hearing, which was originally to have been held this week, will focus on pro-growth policies. continue reading » 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more

READ MORE

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

READ MORE

first_imgTo access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week. Would you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletterslast_img

READ MORE

first_img Metro Sport ReporterTuesday 15 Sep 2020 9:35 amShare this article via facebookShare this article via twitterShare this article via messengerShare this with Share this article via emailShare this article via flipboardCopy link6.2kShares Don’t bring this bastard near my club. @Arsenal pic.twitter.com/sDaM1pdsu7— qaliil (@qaliilshaafto) September 14, 2020 Comment Advertisement Runarsson quickly deleted the tweets after they were brought to light, with some Arsenal fans even suggesting he should not be signed as a result of the posts – though most recognise he was a young kid tweeting in anger during a difficult period for the club.Arsenal had originally targeted Brentford’s David Raya as a replacement for Martinez, though the Championship club refused to sell, with Runarsson’s looming bargain arrival freeing up more funds to be spent on a new midfielder.MORE: Sead Kolasinac set to stay at Arsenal after talks with Mikel ArtetaMORE: Arsenal target Runar Alex Runarsson as Emiliano Martinez joins Aston Villa for £20mFollow Metro Sport across our social channels, on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram.For more stories like this, check our sport page. Runar Alex was just 14 when he posted the tweets nearly a decade ago (Picture: Twitter)A month later, with Fabregas now having left and Nasri primed to join Manchester City, he tweeted again, saying: ‘Arsene Wenger is definitely the dumbest man on this planet!’ and once again hashtagged the term ‘French f**k’.That tweet also coincided with a defeat, with Arsenal having lost 2-0 at home to Liverpool the day before, and just a week later they would be ripped apart at Old Trafford, losing 8-2.center_img Runarsson will cost significantly less than previous target David Raya (Picture: Getty)However, some eagled-eyed Arsenal fans have dug up tweets made by the Icelandic shot-stopper when he was a teenager – which Runarsson has since deleted – in which he slams the north London club’s legendary former manager.AdvertisementAdvertisementADVERTISEMENTBack in July 2011, the keeper – who appears to be a very frustrated Arsenal fan – tweeted: ‘Arsene Wenger is a little too stupid!’ and hashtagging ‘French f**k’.It is not entirely clear what might have riled the young Runarsson, who would have been just 14 at the time, though Arsenal would sell both Cesc Fabregas and Samir Nasri that summer. The goalkeeper was just a teenager when he posted the messages almost a decade ago (Pictures: Getty)Prospective new Arsenal signing Runar Alex Runarsson may have some bridges to build at the Emirates after branding Arsene Wenger a ‘French f**k’ in now deleted tweets.The Iceland international has emerged as a bargain replacement for Emiliano Martinez, who is on the verge of joining Aston Villa in a £20million deal that means the Gunners are in need of a new deputy to Bernd Leno.Runarsson has been identified as the man to plug that gap, with goalkeeper coach Inaki Cana having worked with him at Nordsjaelland and current club Dijon setting a price tag of just £1.5m. Advertisement Arsenal target Runar Alex Runarsson deletes tweets calling Arsene Wenger a ‘French f**k’last_img read more

READ MORE